Gunman claimed he was in fear for his life

| 19/04/2024 | 10 Comments
Justin Kyle Jackson (left) and Eric Brian Williams Soto, accompanied by prison guards (and the court), visit the scene of the crime during the murder trial

(CNS): Justin Kyle Jackson, who alongside Eric Soto is expected to be sentenced on Friday for the manslaughter of retired prison officer Harry Elliott, told the police that days after that fatal shooting, he was armed with a different gun to the one that killed Elliott because he was in fear for his life.

Caine Thomas, who Jackson claimed had taken him and Soto to School Road to rob the numbers shop where Elliott was killed, was murdered the day before Jackson was arrested for possession of the second gun, and he told the police that he, too, had received threats.

Jackson told a social worker that he believed that if he had not handed himself in and been remanded in jail, he would also have been killed. To date, no one has been charged with the murder of Caine Thomas, who was also a key witness for the crown in a violent home invasion in 2017.

Alongside his conviction for manslaughter and the possession of a loaded unlicensed gun in relation to the death of Elliott, Jackson faces a separate firearms charge for the second gun.

While Jackson was on the run from the police over the Elliott killing, the police heard he was in West Bay in a white car and went in pursuit. They followed Jackson, who was in the car with Soto, up the Esterley Tibbetts Highway towards George Town, but during the chase, Jackson lost control of the car and crashed. He then fled on foot, leaving a 9mm Taurus semi-automatic handgun behind.

He later handed himself in and admitted to having the gun. Soto was also initially charged with its possession but later acquitted because Jackson admitted it was his gun and that Soto had no idea it was in the car.

Jackson is facing a mandatory minimum of seven years in jail, but in court Thursday, his attorney, Sallie Bennet-Jenkins KC, argued that to add seven years on top of the lengthy term Jackson is likely to get for the manslaughter conviction would be unjust and disproportionate, especially as the crimes have some connection.

The judge has the choice to run the sentence for the illegal gun possession concurrently or consecutively if she believes the crimes were connected, as she must consider the principle of totality and what could be a disproportionately long sentence.

Deputy Director of Public Prosecutions Candia James Malcolm said the crimes were “similar in nature” and in close proximity, but they were still different crimes. However, she accepted that the judge must consider the global time her sentences would impose on Jackson.

Justice Cheryll Richards, who is presiding over the case, said she needed to consider how she would deal with the issue overnight and would deliver her ruling at 10am on Friday.


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Comments (10)

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  1. Anonymous says:

    These scumbags deserve nothing less than serving the rest of their lives making big rocks into small ones on a remote island penal colony.

  2. Anonymous says:

    Participating in armed robbery and murder and the poor boy is scared for his life? Tough rhymes with bit pal.

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  3. Marlon says:

    what a load of horse s–t. Are we dealing with children here, or adults? Give these two scallywags their just dessert, or just let them go!

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  4. Anonymous says:

    Throw the book at him please.

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  5. Anonymous says:

    100 years each, no possibility of parol.

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    2
  6. Anonymous says:

    Run those sentences consecutively!! Do the crime, do the time! These losers are getting sentences that are way too short and not at all deterrents.

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  7. Anonymous says:

    #blamebuju

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