Fake crime story was distortion of domestic report

| 03/07/2017 | 3 Comments

(CNS): The police have now revealed that the unnerving fake report of a potential home invasion scam was probably a distortion of a genuine domestic violence report. Police said that further research into the account of the incident that circulated on social media last week is similar to a report made on 24 June on Midsummer Drive in Bodden Town, in which a woman knocked on a neighbour’s door seeking sanctuary from a violent boyfriend.

Police said that while the woman had apparently gone looking for help before police arrived, it was not a scam to gain entry, she did not leave the area and it was her boyfriend who drove away while the woman returned to her own house. The RCIPS said that officers responded promptly to the woman’s call and arrest the man on the same day.

“We can confirm that there is no indication whatsoever in this incident that the woman was attempting to gain entry to the homes for any other reason than to seek assistance,” the RCIPS said. “We do hope this serves to clarify the origins of the WhatsApp message and allay concerns it may have caused. The 911 Communications Centre has confirmed that it did receive calls from neighbours that morning.”

The police noted that the original message circulating on social media did not provide a date, street name or person’s name with which to appropriately search for relevant information about activity alleged.

They encourage those who have information about suspicious activity to report it to 911 so that officers have the information needed to evaluate potential threats to public safety and respond accordingly. This includes providing the public with necessary and verified information.

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Category: Crime, Police

Comments (3)

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  1. Live in Harmony says:

    Perhaps law enforcement ought to consider tracking the origin of such message and consider prosecuting in a manner that could lend to deterring repetitious acts considering they are likely contrary to section 64 of the penal code –

    “64. (1) A person who publishes any false statement, rumour or report which is likely to cause fear or alarm to the public or to disturb the public peace commits an offence and is liable to a fine of five thousand dollars and to imprisonment for five years.

    (2) It shall be a defence to a charge under subsection (1) if the accused proves that, prior to the publication, he took such measures to verify the accuracy of such statement, rumour or report as to lead him reasonably to believe that it was true.”

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    • Anonymous says:

      That won’t work, you’d have to arrest half of the country….

    • Jah Dread says:

      Agreed there are some I particular who just cant help themselves with this penchant for making these reports. Verify your story and reverify before you create scandalism.

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