Over 1,000 people waiting for PR and status decisions

| 15/01/2024 | 189 Comments

(CNS): The new Caymanian Status and Permanent Residency Board could be facing five new applications for the Right to be Caymanian every weekday for the next decade, based on the current number of people qualifying following years of widespread exemptions from term limits and the lowering of barriers, local lawyers are warning. There is now a backlog of over 1,000 people waiting for decisions on their PR or status applications, and this number is growing, which means that while new members have been appointed to the relevant boards, some applicants could be waiting as long as four years for the decision.

“We have long warned of the consequences. Ready or not, here they come,” said local attorney Nick Joseph from HSM in a long and detailed update for his clients on the myriad problems associated with the current inadequate process.

Despite these multiple problems with Cayman’s immigration system, the government continues to claim that it is working on immigration reform. Over the last few years, Joseph, who will soon be retiring from legal practice, has documented the current trials and tribulations relating to the immigration process, from work permit issues to status applications.

In what he said was likely to be his last update, as his colleagues at HSM will be taking over, Joseph issued one of his most dire warnings yet about the impact the number of applicants and the mounting backlog will have on Cayman.

According to the information supplied by Joseph, which is based largely on the firm’s experiences with its many clients, the government has made very little progress over the last few months on considering applications, as it appears to be stalling rather than tackling the issues. There has been almost no explanation as to why the board processed so few applications last year or why it took the members of the UPM, formerly PACT, so long to appoint new members to several immigration boards after it allowed the tenure of the previous board members to lapse.

At the end of November, there were 788 pending applications for the Right to be Caymanian based on marriage or naturalisation, which has likely increased over the last few weeks. In addition, the Caymanian Status and Permanent Residency Board has not determined a single points-based PR application for more than two years. There are 37 “Schrodinger’s Caymanians” also in limbo awaiting “continuation”, another nine awaiting determinations as to whether they are worthy of recommendation to Cabinet, and another 49 awaiting decisions on their right to be Caymanian by descent.

Joseph estimates that individuals waiting on a decision have little hope of their applications being determined any time soon, and unless the government picks up the pace or begins to seriously address how the process works, the backlog will be really difficult to address because each time one person achieves PR, it paves the way for their dependents to apply, adding to the backlog.

“The delays in determining applications quickly compound and accordingly have negative consequences well beyond the individual applicants currently waiting,” Joseph noted in the latest circular to clients.

As well as the mounting backlog it causes, the stalling of PR applications means that employers, many of them Caymanian, are paying work permit fees well past the time staff should have become residents and assume their own PR fee expenses. Meanwhile, the backlog in Caymanian status applications means that thousands of people are being improperly prevented from registering to vote and participating in the electoral process.

“The numbers are material and has a very real potential to impact the results of any election. That is an affront to more than pocketbooks. That is an insult to our concept of democracy and the principles which underpin it,” Joseph said, as he outlined the numerous knock-on impacts of these long-running delays and the failure of successive administrations to solve the immigration problems.

The immigration legal expert urged the government to equip the newly appointed board with the tools, resources and mandate necessary to clear any backlog within the next year and to set a mandate that, save in exceptional circumstances, all immigration applications should be determined within six months. “The money exists,” he said, noting that the government collects well over CI$100 million in immigration revenue each year.  

There are currently around 6,000 permanent residents who will go on over the next few years to apply for status, which Joseph pointed out will lead to growing delays, and given the number of work permit holders who currently qualify, the boards will be dealing with about 1,000 new applicants for the Right to be Caymanian every year going forward.

“The new Board and Secretariat need to be ready,” he said. “It appears they could easily be facing five new applications for the Right to be Caymanian every weekday for the next decade, just based on the current numbers of persons who are becoming qualified following years of widespread exemptions from term limits and a lowering of key barriers to settlement here. We have long warned of the consequences. Ready or not, here they come.”

Joseph also warned that the delays in the processing and determining of status applications are likely unlawful. He stressed that the fault does not lie with WORC Director Jeremy Scott since neither he nor his department has the authority to determine applications to grant the Right to be Caymanian on the basis of marriage, naturalisation, descent or continuation.

“We lawyers are left watching on from the sidelines with bemusement and frustration,” he said, adding that while people can sue and will likely win, such action can take a toll personally, professionally and economically. He said that the appeal process where a board or individual is accused of unlawfulness could have adverse consequences. “There may be freedom of speech, but no matter how inappropriate this caveat may be, there is no freedom from the consequences, however proper the exercise of that speech,” he noted.

The PACT Government established a committee under the chairmanship of local attorney Steve McField back in August 2022. But more than 16 months later, the results of that work have still not been made public, though it is understood that Cabinet now has the final document from that committee. However, following a number of successful legal challenges about the arbitrary and unfair nature of how the points are awarded, the work focused only on the point system.

But addressing the points system does not deal with the main issue of who gets to qualify for residency and ultimately to be Caymanian, after how long, and whether or not the government wants to continue growing the population at its current pace through imported labour, as is the case at present.

During the budget debate last month, Premier Juliana O’Connor-Connolly said that legislative changes to the Immigration Reform Act would be brought in the coming year to address the “many outstanding issues”, but she did not go into detail about those plans. “While we accept that foreign labour will be required to maintain our economy, we also do not accept that everyone upon arrival should be on an automatic pathway to citizenship,” she said. “These are important yet sensitive discussions that we must have as a community.”

Immigration remains a major conundrum for the government as it attempts to please voters, who tend to support much tighter immigration controls, and employers, who depend on imported labour and have always resisted any kind of restrictions on their ability to employ who they want from wherever they want. The current system also allows some employers to keep wages very low for unskilled workers and, on the other end of the job spectrum, to compete for the best global talent for the offshore financial sector.


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Category: Local News, Politics

Comments (189)

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  1. Anonymous says:

    The Government will face so many lawsuits that it will not win. Why can’t someone at the government take some legal advice as it’s clear that these applications have to be processed within reasonable timeframe otherwise applicants can sue as government has duty to actually govern (make the decisions). Reasonable time frame is pretty clearly defined in previous cases (means generally not longer than year)

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  2. Anonymous says:

    We know what’s really going to happen, don’t we? Same thing as in 2003 – mass grants so as to clear this illegal backlog! All it will take is a few filings on human rights grounds!

    These morons we elect time after time never learn from anyone, not even their predecessors’ mistakes!!

    Now, the politicians DO NOT manage the immigration processes, the “dear” DG and former Chief Immigration Officer, has many civil servants responsible for managing immigration procedures.

    How did they manage to create this situation again??

    Morons in charge of “world ass” CIG!!

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  3. Anonymous says:

    When we make poor people “Caymanians”, we are only making real Caymanians poorer in every way!! Stop importing poverty!!

    Stop issuing new permits! Enforce existing laws to ensure Caymanians are trained for posts held by permit holders on upon expiry of their permits! Upon the expiry of most permits, a Caymanian should be trained. Tailor rules/regs to apply appropriately to certain trades/jobs. I.E. some trades require greater training than others, thus tailor WP terms to meet that requirement!

    To do that, CIG must ensure better public education standards; implement vocational training and apprenticeship programs across all trades!!

    Issue PR and later status based on applicants assimilation into Cayman society AND their financial means!! Drop the stupid “points system”. Stop importing poverty!!!!

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    • Anonymous says:

      I mostly agree with you but what does “assimilation” mean? I don’t even want to be in the same room as the drunk thugs, criminals and bigots a majority of Caymanians vote for… I think it’s unreasonable in the extreme to expect any decent person no matter where they are from to assimilate with them or their supporters.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Everything you are asking for already exists, it is just not being enforced by the Caymanian elected government and their appointed boards.

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  4. Anonymous says:

    You know what has really pissed me off? All the Caymanians I have been friends with for well over a decade, socialised with, spent a lot of time with, called them my friends, helped them out with all their problems, supported them, baby sat their kids, fed their pets when they are on vacation, helped out with DIY, done all sorts of favors, even supported some of them financially when they asked.
    When I need to apply for my naturalization as a BOTC and have to get three references from Caymanians…how suddenly they all disappeared and would not give me a reference because they are ‘too busy’. Now they ghost me since I have found out how they truly feel. How two faced can you be! Seems they were not my friends after all, just using me, and secretly hating on me behind my back and wanting me to leave because I wasn’t born here. I feel so betrayed. Now I feel you simply cannot trust or believe a Caymanian friend because maybe they are just waiting to stab you in the back.
    But no matter because all of my expat friends who are now BOTC were all only too happy to support me and give me a lovely reference. Those are the truly good people.

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    • Anonymous says:

      …on today’s episode of “Things That Never Happened”.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Literally a troll bait comment and so unbelievable.

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      • Anonymous says:

        I had a similar experience when I asked one “generational” Caymanian for a reference, so I believe the original poster.

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        • Anonymous says:

          I am a generational Caymanian, and me and many family members have signed these documents for immigrant friends (now status holders). Your anecdotal “evidence” is BS.

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        • Anonymous says:

          I’ve had it too. So called friends for years and then when I asked for a reference, it was declined because we don’t need any more foreigners becoming Caymanian. Felt liked I’d been punched in the stomach. But at least I know now how they really feel.

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          • Anonymous says:

            You could have asked them in the beginning of your relationship and they would have told you that. Funny how your friendship to them is contingent on them signing your status papers, whereas they accepted you into their homeland with open arms during your time here, and somehow they’re the bad guys.

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    • Anonymous says:

      This anti-Caymanian propaganda is getting wild 😂
      You couldn’t find 3 Caymanians to sign a piece of paper, even though you have intimate knowledge of them, their families, and where they lived? You know Caymanians don’t have a quota on how many of those they can sign, right?

      This shit is fabricated from top to bottom.

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    • Anonymous says:

      The issue i’m afraid is that a lot of permanent residents feel entitled to citizenship. No one is entitled to status. It is a privilege and an honour to be granted caymanian citizenship and should not be expected. If you had been here since the early 90s for example you’d know that aside from the widespread handing out status grants like in ‘03 which is frowned upon, typically applicants need to show why they deserve to be made a Caymanian. This is not an easy hurdle to overcome and is not a decision that is taken lightly.

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    • Anonymous says:

      You can take this BS and peddle it somewhere else!

      I’ve written letters for “nice” expats who were waiters and bartenders. They now act like they don’t know me now that they have status and have become Real Estate salespeople and rub elbows with that coked-out ilk.

      I don’t care how “sweet” and caring about Caymanians they are when they meet me now… I refuse to write another letter for ANYONE. Expats hang with expats and use locals for personal gain.

      The comments section on this site is PROOF of the anti-Caymanian sentiment that our Government has allowed to fester.

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      • Anonymous says:

        What’s hilarious is that they are too cowardly to put their names to any of their vitriol. They wouldn’t dare risk having to get off the gravy train, or go back home to the biting winter cold.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Ummm – being Caymanian isn’t enough to give you a reference for Naturalisation. Only two references are required and they but be from BOTC’s. It is irrelevant whether the writer is Caymanian or not.

      Thousands of Caymanians are not BOTC’s. Thousands of BOTC’s are not Caymanian.

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  5. Anonymous says:

    It’s really very simple if Caymanians don’t want to provide a path to PR and Status then we must first accept that the quality of professional expats filling our FS jobs will fall, if not collapse. This will inevitably lead to a loss of FS business which is the driver of the vast majority of CIG’s income. Once we accept that, then by all means change the law and make it harder. What we can’t do is simply ignore the existing law; at the very least taking over a year to rubber stamp some documents is maladministration, dragging the process over yet another year of PR fees is fraudulent and not adhering to our own laws is obviously illegal.

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    • Anonymous says:

      That’s not true though is it? Bermuda makes it almost impossible to earn citizenship yet has no issue attracting talent because wages are so high. Cayman is no different we just make it too easy for people to get status.

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  6. Quote from Bob marley says:

    WE DON’T NEED NOMORE PEOPLE?

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    • Anonymous says:

      But you do need some decent schooling it seems.

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      • Anonymous says:

        It was a play on Bob Marley’s “We don’t need no more trouble”.

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      • Anonymous says:

        True. Hence why expats should just say in their home countries that have better education, better people, better governments… better everything (apparently).

        Stop trying to live in Cayman if everything about our islands and our people is stupid.

        Leave us idiots to our own devices while you stay in your home country and enjoy a better life with more money and better quality of people.

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        • Anonymous says:

          Run off the financial services to Singapore so we can destroy the economy.

          Brilliant!

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          • Anonymous says:

            People thumbing this down lack critical thinking skills.

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            • Anonymous says:

              More likely they lack the patience to continue to hear hollow BS threats from people that need Cayman as much if not more than Cayman needs them.

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  7. CSF says:

    The current PR/status situation is disgraceful in multiple ways, as many of the comments already reflect.

    In terms of timing and delays, however, it is worth bearing in mind that residency and immigration are a challenge in many countries. Hopefully the link below will upload correctly – it is a recent article that illustrates the challenges experienced by Indian workers and their families under the current US immigration system (which is challenging enough for immigrants from Western nations).

    The main take-away is the estimate that an Indian immigrant starting the green card process now could wait 130 years for it.

    https://www.seattletimes.com/opinion/outdated-green-card-laws-hurt-workers-from-india/

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  8. Anonymous says:

    Let’s review the record after decades of so-called ‘multigenerational* Caymanian politicians’ (* you’re all expats, some just arrived earlier than others). In no particular order:

    – The dump.
    – “Five-mile (and shrinking) Beach”.
    – The public ‘transport system’.
    – Saunders’ transparent attempt to introduce garrison politics.
    – Kenneth Bryan’s new personal Cayman Airlines’ new route to his Caribbean tourist board meetings in Barbados.
    – No restoration of the pre-covid evening Miami flights which used to be so useful for travellers coming home to Cayman.
    – Government departments taking each other to court! (Fnarr, fnarr, roll up and watch the incompetence – perhaps we could sell tickets to replace rapidly failing revenue in other areas?!)
    – The insane cost of living, which discourages both tourists and financial services workers, thus undermining both pillars of the islands’ revenue.
    – 1 in 4 children in Cayman starting primary school overweight (https://www.caymancompass.com/2023/05/03/1-in-4-kids-begin-primary-school-overweight).
    – The number of MLAs who have beaten women.
    – Jon Jon’s ‘lamp post cover-up’.
    – Bush’s persistent criminality.
    – Persistent education failure. 2021: “Almost 60% of Year 11 students miss 2021 exam targets*, 2023: “Only 27% of all students…reached the expected standards in all three core subjects of reading, writing and maths.” https://caymannewsservice.com/2023/05/report-shows-school-leaver-results-drop-from-peak (https://caymannewsservice.com/2022/04/almost-60-of-year-11-students-miss-2021-exam-targets). (Severe educational failure has been the norm for decades. See this Cayman Compass article from back in 2016. Nothing has changed. https://www.caymancompass.com/2016/01/21/barlow-education-versus-protection)

    – More competently-run jurisdictions (yes, I know, it doesn’t take much) are stealing Cayman’s revenue. See this Financial Times article, “Singapore and Hong Kong vie to be the Caymans (sic) of Asia” which notes:
    “The two cities have set up new fund structures to lure wealth away from traditional offshore financial centres… Singapore established the Variable Capital Company, a fund structure that allows a wide range of potential users to shelter large pools of capital in discreet, lightly taxed wrappers domiciled in a well-regulated financial centre… Investor take-up, particularly in Singapore, has been rapid. The bankers, fund managers and lawyers involved in setting them up say their impact could be far more widespread and more disruptive than previously imagined, drawing assets and expertise into the region… The new vehicles represent a direct challenge to traditional offshore finance centres whose success has been built on privacy and low taxes and whose economies are heavily dependent on the revenue generated by financial services… Singaporean authorities, frustrated at the tendency of local fund managers to register investment vehicles offshore rather than in Singapore itself, launched the rival VCC in 2020. It made it easier for overseas and domestic entities to register an investment vehicle in Singapore… For Singapore the rush to establish the new structures has been especially pronounced. “Prior to 2020 the vast majority of Singaporean managers had their funds in offshore jurisdictions such as the Cayman Islands, Mauritius or Luxembourg. Now the tables have turned,” says Mahip Gupta, a partner at Singapore-based Dhruva Advisors.“ Since the Variable Capital Company structure was introduced, most have chosen Singapore as their fund domiciliation hub.”” https://www.ft.com/content/88e20280-bb6e-4209-ae76-d7183c60ff62, 20 March 2023.

    – They are succeeding, heralding the start of the slow death of the financial services sector: Cayman’s own Economics and Statistics Office (ESO) August 2022 warning that banks and trusts are moving off island: “Banks & Trusts: The total value of international banking assets domiciled in the Cayman Islands declined by 12.9 percent… Similarly, international liabilities domiciled locally fell by 13.0 percent…” (https://www.eso.ky/UserFiles/page_docums/files/uploads/the_cayman_islands_annual_economic_repor-7.pdf, page 27).

    Cayman is in a downward spiral and doom loop, due to its dysfunctional politicians. Many expats are preparing contingency plans for when the MLA Moron Mob eventually finish the place off. Sadly, because of the political system, it’s probably beyond salvage. Make your money, and prepare to get out in 5-10 years at most:

    1. Expats can’t engage in politics: even those of us with status can’t stand for election. Colleagues without status can’t risk annoying people and losing their work permit by being openly critical (hence anonymous CNS comments are the only source of dissent).

    2. It’s tragic, but no intelligent and honest Caymanian could ever be sensibly advised to go into politics, as that would trap them on this tiny, incompetently run spec of land in the middle of the Caribbean. Consequently, only bottom-feeders, knuckle-draggers and window lickers stand for election. Cayman’s best and brightest are busy developing the ability to work overseas, in proper careers. Anyone sensible is pursuing a profession which gives them global opportunities, e.g. IT or accountancy. By such choices the top e.g. 75% of Caymanians self-select out of politics. The bottom 25% of remaining oxygen thieves then engage in a race to the bottom to bribe people for ‘wotes’.

    3. This is why Caymanian politicians are so uniquely awful (definitely incompetent, probably corrupt, often criminal). They have effectively excluded anyone decent from power. Every country has morons, criminals, thieves, and the congenitally dishonest among their politicians. Cayman’s problem is that political candidates seem to come *exclusively* from such people. This then exacerbates the problem identified at (2): capable, hardworking and intelligent Caymanians see the ‘death spiral’ direction of travel, and are determined to develop escape options focusing on global skills, not parochial, inbred local politics.

    4. Cayman is presently incapable of self-government. PR and status holders should be allowed to both vote and stand for election. See comments under: https://caymannewsservice.com/2023/03/premier-admits-widening-of-caymans-economic-success-gap/comment-page-1. It won’t happen though, because the MLA Moron Mob know that (a) only idiots will vote for them; and (b) the current mob rely on their being no decent alternatives – they’re terrified by the idea of competition. PR/status voters and candidates would wreck the morons’ gravy train. As one person noted on this article, most Caymanian politicians wouldn’t be trusted with a mop and brush anywhere else in the world (or even in the private/expat sector here).

    I don’t blame intelligent, honest and hard-working Caymanians for not getting involved in politics: I picked my job to look after my children, and any Caymanian with sense will do likewise, which means being internationally employable. That does, inevitably, however mean that you are led by the dregs. Ultimately, even though I have status, I can go home: most Caymanians aren’t as fortunate, which is why I highlight the problem.

    If only there was a pool of intelligent, hard-working, well educated, highly-qualified and honest pool of people – who aren’t trapped in Cayman and thus disincentivised from politics – from whom better candidates could be identified… 🤷‍♀️. It’ll never happen, but you can’t say that you weren’t warned! 🙂

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  9. Rodney Barnett says:

    I can’t but hep wondering if is is a civil rights issue.

    After all, the CIC has established laws and procedures to address this issue. Why does the government follow its own laws? It appears that the Cayman Islands is a dictatorship run by a few political insiders and elites for their own benefit.

    Example MILLIONS OF DOLLARS per year in fees that provide nothing to those paying them. That is other than the right to have a job.

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  10. moratorium says:

    There is no choice but to grant PR and status, respectively, to those people already in the system who have legitimately earned it. The government made a promise, and it must be kept. But going forward, THERE SHOULD BE AN IMMEDIATE MORATORIUM ON NEW WORKERS. That is, no new workers allowed, just replacement of current workers (one for one) who leave.

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    • Anonymous says:

      How would we expand or contract our economy with a static workforce? Each of these committed applicants needs to meet criteria at each step of PR, Naturalisation, and CI Status – consistently tested and many years apart, or be rolled over. At each step, the fact is, many meet the criteria, or don’t get rolled as they should have. We really can’t blame fair and square applicants for that.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Great suggestion, but ideally Jamaicans can only be replaced by any other nationality to balance their influence.
      Saunders Seymour and Kenny would fight that of course.

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  11. Anonymous says:

    I predict that once Nick is on his own, his first major case will be the class action suit against the CIG. A firm like HSM has too many staff on work permits to risk retribution, but Nick won’t have that worry. Ready or not, here it comes CIG – and once this gets to court (it very likely will take an appeal) the CIG will lose and thousands will get Status virtually overnight.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Good point, and highlights what is wrong with all these Boards – take them on and risk retribution. We all know it goes on, indeed it isn’t the exception it is the rule in Cayman. The Boards will just go on doing whatever they feel like regardless of statute, confident they will never truly be challenged.

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    • Anonymous says:

      I will join this in a heart beat. Just had to pay my third annual fee since my lawful application for status was submitted….and ignored for years. It’s extortion, and denies me my right to vote and get these jokers out.

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      • Ezra says:

        You don’t have a right to be here . You or someone else applied for you to be here it was reviewed and granted.? I talkevitvhas snd you have now come to the stage of another application which again does not give you the absolute right but the privilege of applying which does not automatically mean that your application will be approved. Then please tell me where do you read that the processes above guarantee you will be granted the right to remain and have the right to vote.? It’s maybe you can or maybe you wont.

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        • Anonymous says:

          You sir, have the right to speak English, should you choose. Exercise that right, please!

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        • Anonymous says:

          Ezra, the government set out in legislation the pathway to be followed. The governments Caymanians all voted for. The legislation Caymanians wrote and accepted.
          We have completed all of the steps along that pathway in good faith and at great expense for the last 18 years. We meet and exceed all of the critieria they have asked for. We’re good people who take away nothing from Caymanians.
          Cayman is our country now. Our lives are here and always will be. To be constantly rejected and told we don’t have a right to stay here, and aren’t wanted is beyond upsetting.
          We’ve done nothing wrong, and everything right.
          Now I have been told I am unable to leave to visit and care for my terminally ill father in my home country in the last few months of his life because being out of Cayman for 90 days in any year will invalidate my status application for 5 years and I’ll have to start again.
          Its heartbreaking.
          I hope you never have to face these sort of choices where a political decision to hold up status applications means my father will likely die without me by his side.

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          • Anonymous says:

            I would check your advice with an immigration lawyer like Nicks firm. You have to retain residence- but I was told if you maintain a house or apartment here and make sure you are not away for more than 6 monthsatatime you should be good. Didn’t affect my status application.

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          • Anonymous says:

            Your status application will not be invalidated in the circumstances you describe. Any risk would be in relation to an application to become a BOTC. Those rules are set by the UK. NOT Cayman.

          • Anonymous says:

            The legislation was neither written by, or accepted, by Caymanians. What they were told was being drafted, and what has been produced and operated, are two very different things.

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            • Anonymous says:

              Caymanian legislators or the ones who pass laws. Are you saying they were too lazy to read what they passed?

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              • Anonymous says:

                No. But they may have had undue confidence in those drafting the laws, and those advising them.

    • Anonymous says:

      Is that what is delaying the judicial review application? It seems long overdue, given the immense incompetence / dishonesty at all levels of CIG and the civil service.

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      • Anonymous says:

        The problem is that everyone entitled to apply for the judicial review is terrified to do so thinking that they will lose residency as well as status as the government doesn’t like being shown up.

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    • Anonymous says:

      8.53 …Nick is not a vindictive person, and he will only fight for you if the law is on your side.
      His moral compass would not entertain anything else.

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  12. Anon says:

    Good article. Eye opening.

    The quote from Premier Julianna towards the end makes a lot of sense.

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    • Rodney Barnett says:

      In my opinion, her quote is simply political double talk. As usual, no commitment, no actions that could be expected, and no promises.

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  13. Anonymous says:

    just imagine if our Vulture Fund King was on this list, – he’d have The Carrie Lee impounded, works in the National Gallery going to exhibitions compromised and probably the Govt held to ransom, – JuJu be thankful Nick Joseph is no Paul Singer

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  14. Anonymous says:

    Kenneth and co your time longer than rope. this from the knowledge bestowed on me for my history test.

    don’t think for one minute I (and others) won’t sue for our right to vote the useless caymanian politicians out and appoint people that won’t be swayed by $$.

    we all know the delay is because y’all know that once these status grants are made, none of you useless politicians will ever see the light of day in Cayman politics again.

    and good riddance.

    it’s about time we had people represent the better of our Islands, not corrupt special interests.

    even if it takes every dollar I have, ill fight you to the death and obtain my right to vote you all out.

    and you know what? so many others will do the same.

    it’s game set and match. pity it took you 15 years to figure it out!

    c ya in court suckers… !

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    • Anonymous says:

      If only that were possible 9.01…
      Unfortunately thousands of Jamaicans will have the same privileges, and we’ll all be in a worse position than we are now.
      They’ll make this current uneducated unemployable bunch look like a group of Sunday school teachers.

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  15. Anonymous says:

    I wonder

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  16. Anonymous says:

    I am a Caymanian married to an expat. We have been married 20 years, we have given up with the status application which has now been years.

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  17. Anonymous says:

    How many people waiting, and eligible for status, have had to pay an extra years fees due to the Caymanian Status and Permanent Residency Board incompetence. I would be willing to bet there are millions of dollars that have been collected as a result and is a class action law suit waiting to happen. Any lawyers want to pick this up on a no win no fee basis?

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    • Anonymous says:

      The answer to your last question being “no” tells you everything you need to know about this situation. All these threats about law suits are entertaining to read, but they are completely hollow.

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    • Anonymous says:

      I have been waiting so long for my status that I have just paid my third annual fee since my application was submitted. You can be sure I will be applying for a repayment of those fees that should not have been paid.

      17
      12
      • Anonymous says:

        Anybody know how to do this? Just got status in the last batch of applications processed after waiting three years

        11
    • Anonymous says:

      We will sue for these fees too!

      7
      13
      • Anonymous says:

        There you have it, the new Caymanian/PR mentality, always entitled for compensation.

        23
        6
        • Anonymous says:

          I think they are entitled to expect the government to follow it’s own laws.

          Otherwise, yes, litigate to enforce those laws.

          12
          15
  18. Anonymous says:

    Amy I missing something on your math calculation?

    There are 250 work days in a year.

    1000 applicants / 5 per day = 200 days. So less than one year.

    Not ideal but a whole lot better than a decade!

    CNS: I think you need to read the whole article again. The projections include future applications, not just the current backlog.

    2
    2
    • Anonymous says:

      Read it multiple times and got that out of it. But still quite a stretch to go from 1 year to a decade. Yes, I know they will keep coming in but a little effort should be able to clear this backlog and not take a decade when you add new ones in.

      A bit of hyperbole by CNS here me thinks.

      CNS: It’s really hard to answer this because you just haven’t understood what you read. So the “hyperbole” that you see is a misreading of the article.

      Fist of all, “…a little effort should be able to clear this backlog and not take a decade when you add new ones in”. This is precisely what Nick Joseph is saying. This is not happening but it should. It’s the whole point of the article. Right now almost none are being dealt with, so the backlog is growing.

      Secondly, you’re basing your calculations on working days in a year. We’re talking about boards that meet maybe once per month.

      Read paragraph 11 a couple of times until you properly understand it: “The immigration legal expert urged the government to equip the newly appointed board with the tools, resources and mandate necessary to clear any backlog within the next year and to set a mandate that, save in exceptional circumstances, all immigration applications should be determined within six months.”

      Thirdly, you haven’t understood the reference to a decade. You’ve somehow muddled this with how long it will take to get through the backlog, whereas it is, in fact, taken from a direct quote by Nick Joseph (para 13 and in the summary at the beginning of the article), which concerns new applications, based on how many people may become eligible over the next few years.

      5
      2
    • Anonymous says:

      There are 6,000 people who already have PR who will be qualifying to apply for status over the next 6 years – without counting the thousands more who will be granted PR over the next few years.

      7
      2
  19. Elvis says:

    Everyones afraid to deal with them in fear of appeals and law governing the decisions. No one wants their name on a denial if u want the truth

    17
    1
  20. Anonymous says:

    Must be too easy to gain status. More stringent requirements are needed.

    42
    41
    • Anonymous says:

      Other than 15 years continuous residence with a clean record, meeting the financial independence, knowledge of Cayman culture and social contribution test,and property ownership thresholds set for PR along the way? Way too easy compared with the alternative of just having an anchor baby with a Caymanian.

      35
      8
    • Anonymous says:

      Well, since knowing Mac seems to be the basis for around a quarter of today’s Caymanians being Caymanian, I would hazard to guess our standards are not what they should be.

      20
      2
    • Anonymous says:

      All you need is Mac to get you status by cabinet grant..doing things the established legal way is for fools it seems.

      13
      3
    • Anonymous says:

      Says someone that has not had to comply with 5+ years of PR fees and complete a multitude of forms.

      10
      5
      • Anonymous says:

        3.25 I stood in line and went through the Lengthy process, which is why I am angry that comparatively recent wealthy arrivals jump the line through political favors, and then get scholarships for their kid to study abroad.

        24
        1
      • Anonymous says:

        The never ending Police Clearance updates.

        8
        2
    • Anonymous says:

      You obviously know NOTHING about the process

      4
      2
  21. Anonymous says:

    What a mess!

    He is not retiring.

    He is opening up something on his own.

    31
    7
    • Anonymous says:

      Hope he does. If he retires from practice he would be free to run for office. We are a bit short on honest, financially independent and intelligent people amongst our MLAs. Unfortunately we are also a bit short on honest
      , intelligent voters which is why we end up with the JuJus, Dwayne’s and Kennysand nothing ever gets fixed because our politicians either don’t understand how to fix it, or have no interest in fixing it unless it benefits them personally, or because it might offend their backers

      25
      5
    • Anonymous says:

      He should be hired by Government to sort out the mess but doubt the salary offered would entice him to public service

      14
      2
      • Anonymous says:

        Why wouldn’t it be enough? All I’ve ever heard of this man is that he’s a total saint, so surely he’s not a lawyer for the money 🙄

        29
        2
    • Anonymous says:

      Glad he’s not retiring, he is needed.

      13
      18
  22. A. Caymanian says:

    DENY ALL applications. These islands are overcrowded now and there is no proper planning at any level by politicians and civil servants to manage the growth, costs and infrastructure required to get to a population of 100k. Caymanians are the minority in our own country and face discrimination at every level. Expariates have no respect for us and want to create a new Caymsn that reminds of the countries they left to come here.

    Sort out our people and our needs first with proper plans and programs then only consider granting PR and Status after we have addressed the issues facing Caymanians.

    51
    73
    • Anonymous says:

      Sort out our people first-and how many decades have we had to do that? Be honest- it’s not just the immigration system that is dysfunctional -what makes you think the chronic crop of politicians or any of those in office for the last 20 years are actually capable or interested in sorting out difficult problems and making decisions that are good for the islands rather than themselves? I wish intelligent and caring people like Nick would run for office

      31
      9
    • Sick of the crap says:

      Every last one of them. Don’t need these damn expats swarming this islands more than they already have. Send their asses packing

      18
      34
      • Anonymous says:

        Yes! Especially those in the financial services! Those pesky expats contributing to our economy!

        We will all be much better off destitute and free from a stable economy! Our tourism economy will support us all because global pandemics and natural disasters can’t slow that down!

        4
        13
        • Annonymous says:

          7.39am Our contribution to their pocket and standard of living is more than their contribution to us.

  23. Anonymous says:

    Too many being approved & they can’t support themselves financially. Just check NAU & the local food banks.

    50
    11
    • Anonymous says:

      These people are approved based on where they live and who will get their votes.
      Educated professionals don’t hold your breath under current administration.

      16
      3
      • Anonymous says:

        they’re usually approved because they’ve had a Caymanian child. Anyone else needs the points from financial stability.

        6
        10
        • Anonymous says:

          Nope. The current PR system will give an unemployed person with a single dollar of savings, the maximum possible points for financial stability. It is literal insanity.

          19
          4
        • Anonymous says:

          Do you know how easy it is to make a child?! That should NOT be a way to get status. That’s an easy way in for criminals like murderers and pedophiles.

          16
  24. Anonymous says:

    Simply bad mind. They will not get declined, maybe a few. However, remember next time you apply for something, or wait for a result of a medical exam, or you children apply to a university, or something of the sort … Whatever your situation may be, this same energy will back you up for sure.

    8
    20
  25. Anonymous says:

    Enough “Caymanians” already!!!

    30
    29
  26. Anonymous says:

    Just say no to anyone whose been arrested or who owes people money.

    That ought to clip 50% of these applicants.

    58
    2
  27. Anonymous says:

    Sorry but we are full to the rim!!

    46
    14
    • Anonymous says:

      irrelevant…but nonsense anyway.
      cayman could have 200k people living comfortably if they had a proper development plan for the island.

      13
      34
      • Anonymous says:

        Caymanians do not want 200k people living here. We don’t even want 100k people living here, which is part of the reason why the previous administration that threatened us with those numbers was voted out.

        34
        3
  28. Anonymous says:

    How is this even possible? Imagine being outnumbered in your own little island. This is madness and the government should put a stop to this immediately!

    45
    14
    • Anonymous says:

      Your own Caymanians are selling you out.

      18
      7
    • Anonymous says:

      I thought mac’s status grants of 2003 were bad. How have we gotten here again? We can’t manage all of these people, we need to control the numbers for the benefits of Caymanians, how has the various Governments allowed these numbers to get so big? Change the qualification requirements quickly let’s put back the roll over so we reduce those qualifying.

      11
  29. Anonymous says:

    Joseph has resigned from HSM. He is not retiring.

    27
    4
  30. Anonymous says:

    What a clever idea. That definitely wouldn’t cost the government anything in legal fees.

    16
    1
  31. Anonymous says:

    There is also another major concern that the former chair of the Permanent Residency and Cayman Status Board – Mr. Steve McField – is now the Chair of the Appeals Tribunal. Which means he will be presiding the appeals process over decisions he previously signed off on! THe PACT/UPM gov’t itself up for numerous litigation cases! What a knucklehead move to appoint Steve McField to chair the Appeals Tribunal. SMH

    60
    1
    • Anonymous says:

      I can’t belive that he ended up presiding over Appeals Board which is the very same people he rejected. What a farce! Who thought that would be a good idea?

      57
      1
      • Anonymous says:

        Same people who thought appointing him to head the board in the first place – only to watch him deal with zero applications in 2 years-was good idea. Fool me once…..except it was a deliberate decision knowing what the consequences would be. Far easier to have Steve not process applications than do the hard work to reform the law and the system which would either make you unpopular with the electorate or the employers

        22
        1
      • Anonymous says:

        I don’t care how good an idea it is. Is it even legal?

        14
        2
  32. Anonymous says:

    so productive, highly qualified people are being denied their basic human rights due to the incompetence of poorly educated locals….
    welcome to wonderland!

    50
    22
    • Anonymous says:

      2.53, it’s our uneducated politicians who don’t want educated people because they won’t vote for them.
      Just wait and see the caliber of those granted status first….whenever that’s going to be.

      14
      3
    • 345KYDude says:

      Please stop with the facts, they don’t take kindly to common sense in these parts.

      16
      13
    • Ezra says:

      What human rights yow?. It’s not a right to get a permitv and work here, it’s a bloody privilege asquaresus. Furthermorec it is also not a right for a previous work permit holder to gain status. So with all ya hoopah go smoke some more of your hookah and calm down will ya.

      14
      13
      • Anonymous says:

        There must be an unimpeded, lawful path to citizenship. It’s a Human Right. See OHCHR and UNHCR for more info. Goes to show how terribly Caymanians view anyone brought here, at your own invitation and inducement, to help out and do the work! Do it yourself.

        9
        10
        • Gtfo says:

          Trust we don’t invite you to come here. The Government might like to kiss una asses… but locals do not. You can stay where the hell you are trying to wash up from.

          11
          6
      • Anonymous says:

        You’re clearly not on a permit – the English test would have been too much of a stumbling block.

        8
        3
      • Anonymous says:

        It’s a right to have your application processed and a decision made in a timely manner

        8
        3
    • Anonymous says:

      Highly qualified individuals can go back home. Why would they want to be here with “poorly educated locals” go tf home then. Oh right, home isn’t all it’s cracked up to be, that’s why you came here. Stfu and be grateful you were even allowed to come here to begin with

      21
      17
    • Anonymous says:

      It’s not incompetence at all. It’s politics. There are no votes in it. Its that simple. Up there with a new prison, a new courthouse, the pension shambles, and fixing the dump. All urgent national issues, but better to waffle and kick the can down the political road for the next lot that come in.

      10
  33. Anonymous says:

    why is anyone surprised at the shocking level of incompetence of the civil service???
    excuse the political incorrectness…but civil service is a social welfare work placement programme for poorly educated locals who are unable to get real jobs in the private sector…
    if we can’t face facts we will never find the solution.

    47
    14
    • 345KYDude says:

      key word here is real job, the reality here is that most of us locals aren’t qualified nor experienced enough to compete in the private sector.

      15
      21
      • Local says:

        Speak for yourself. You may have been an ignorant enough to not get a proper education, but does not mean that the rest of us did not work out asses off and get our degrees. We then come back home, qualified and ready to serve our community, only to be kicked in the teeth.

        21
        3
  34. Anonymous says:

    another story to make a mockery of the caymankind mantra….

    16
    20
    • Stop with the “Caymankind” nonsense says:

      That bullshit tagline is not something derived from Caymanians. It’s crap that the tourism board slapped together and promoted. Where the people of these islands are supposed to just take whatever garbage is handed to us, smile about it, and not have anything to say.

      12
  35. Anonymous says:

    Another glorious day for the civil service……time for more awards and pay increases!

    25
    7
  36. Anonymous says:

    time for class action lawsuit against the incompetence of the civil service and cig.

    26
    11
  37. Radio Rich says:

    Why would you want PR anyway. Cayman is not the place it used to be. Expensive and to be honest a bit of a shithole.

    I moved to the Eastern Caribbean. Where I live (half way up a mountain) with million dollar views, my one bedroom cottage is $700 pm all inclusive that includes internet and cleaning.

    Excellent healthcare, very clean and green. No crime, definitely no guns. There is no animosity between locals and expats, it’s just not a thing.

    A work permit takes a couple of weeks and if you stay 5 years for a Brit you get automatic residency (2 years if you’re American). Not to mention the diving is some of the best in the Caribbean.

    Half the island is national park, so no building. very beautiful.

    Come live in Saba.

    36
    15
    • Anonymous says:

      Live in Saba and pay income tax..

      17
      3
    • Anonymous says:

      Gordon Bennett, Radio Ritch!! Saba? I’ve been there. Lovely place but definitely one for those who don’t need much in the way of modern stimuli!

      12
    • Anonymous says:

      Population less than 2500 and a total area of about 6 or 7 square miles. What’s not to like about Saba?! A tad limiting some might think however.

      7
      1
    • Anonymous says:

      Please, *please* take this advice.

      Sincerely,
      Caymanians.

      24
      7
      • Anonymous says:

        Majority downvotes on this are proof-positive that when a Caymanian says the same thing an expat does, it is immediately disregarded. White messianic complex go brrrrr

        19
        1
    • Anonymous says:

      Sounds like a very nice place and hopefully developers and investors keep their greedy paws off of it!

      7
      3
    • Anonymous says:

      Might as well go live in Brac

      9
      2
    • Anonymous says:

      So much to do over there that you spend your time trolling media pages for a territory that you are not from and no longer live within? Super exciting! Enjoy evacuating every time there is a cat2+.

      14
      1
  38. Anonymous says:

    I keep saying it but until we have term limits for politicians, these types of issues will get a bandaid fix and it will become the next elected government’s problem to tackle.
    We continue to kick the can down the road on so many issues and each successive government blames the last.
    The politically appointed boards aren’t held accountable and what is the incentive for the new board to clear the backlog?
    The auditors need to check on this cause pretty soon you will hear some getting pushed to the front of the line etc. for either political favours or payouts.
    Meanwhile the lawyers are on standby to start charging and collecting from the wealthy who can afford to push their agendas.

    31
    1
  39. Anonymous says:

    The rules and process for all of these status, naturalisation, residence applications has been on place for a long time. If these are appropriate then the various boards need to be expanded to handle the workload. Then all applicants will have decisions made in a reasonable time, whether that is acceptable or decline. But delaying a review or decision pushes applicants into other boxes to claim a right of abode by default, putting us back to the same situation again when MLAs awarded 3000 status grants, and the inaction by govt will result in the UK making decisions for us. There’s no shortage of candidates for boards, but I suppose the few MPs only want to have family and friends in positions of authority, making corruption a more likely occurrence. Come on govt get you a$$ moving.

    29
    1
  40. Overpopulated says:

    Hope they all get declined!

    48
    99
    • Anonymous says:

      have fun spending all your taxpayer money settling the class action lawsuit.

      30
      16
    • Anonymous says:

      On what lawful basis should these people be declined status? Many have been here working and paying taxes, contributing to the community, and not committing a single crime or offense for 18 years. That’s a lot more than can be said of many people who were born here.

      47
      18
      • Anonymous says:

        There are lots of lawful and perfectly proper reasons for someone who is naturalized and resident for 15 years to be denied status. Most are set out in s.30 of the Act.

        They include:

        Character and conduct
        Public interest
        Numbers of dependents
        Insolvency
        Criminality
        Drug use
        Poor health
        Racism
        The Economy
        Diversity
        Protecting control of economy by Caymanian.

        Our laws are fairly clear. If only we followed them with any consistency. Becoming Caymanian is a privilege for the deserving. Not a right for those that have simply “done their time.”

        18
        5
      • Anonymous says:

        You do realize that many of the people who were born here (and who have contributed little and have committed offenses) are amongst the ones applying for status, right?

        9
        6
    • Anonymous says:

      Even people married for love to generational Caymanians? Or do you what to go back to inbreeding and the consequences that had (the so called Cayman Disease that has been documented & written about ). My wife deserves the opportunity to be granted status & to be able to vote (application pending for nearly a year).

      41
      24
      • Anonymous says:

        Your children deserve the right to vote; your immigrant wife does not. Hope this clears it up for you.

        21
        6
      • Anonymous says:

        For those wondering what Cayman Disease is, it’s the predictable consequence of inbreeding:

        “A Cerebellar Ataxia Locus Identified by DNA Pooling to Search for Linkage Disequilibrium in an Isolated Population from the Cayman Islands
        Arne Nystuen, Paul J. Benke, Joy Merren, Edwin M. Stone, Val C. Sheffield
        Human Molecular Genetics, Volume 5, Issue 4, April 1996, Pages 525–531, https://doi.org/10.1093/hmg/5.4.525

        Abstract
        A non-progressive recessive cerebellar ataxia was identified in a highly inbred Cayman Island population. Cayman cerebellar ataxia is characterized by marked pyschomotor retardation, and prominent cerebellar dysfunction manifested by nystagmus, intention tremor, dysarthric speech, and an ataxic gait. In this study, we identify linkage to chromosome 19p13.3 using pooled DNA samples of affected individuals from an isolated population as PCR template for a genome wide screen with short tandem repeat markers. Our data demonstrate that the DNA pooling approach to identify disease gene loci is feasible using individuals from isolated populations in which kindred relationships are highly complex and exact relationships between all affected individuals are not known. Genetic fine mapping demonstrates that the genetic disease interval is approximately 9 cM, but contained within a small physical region. The existence of multiple individuals that are recombinant with flanking markers indicates that the disease interval can be further narrowed with additional markers.”

        This is what is meant by “Multi-generational Caymanian”.

        Many have suggested that this also explains the calibre of almost all the local politicians, but I couldn’t possibly comment.

        15
        10
    • Anonymous says:

      Not likely and given CIG’s ineptitude. After a certain period they will have lost the ability to deny the applications under several human laws. You can’t just keep people in limbo and think there will be no consequences. Caymanians, the current MLA’s are destroying this beautiful country.

      33
      6
    • Anonymous says:

      Such a short sighted comment. The issue is not these applications, many of them resident over 15 years at this stage and will be approved in an any court room. The issue is Cayman’s addiction to cheap labour and the runaway temp work permits we have in play. Those temp permits often lead to baby mommas and daddas of Caymanians, and that’s how we open ourselves up to becoming little Jamaica and the Caribbean Phillipines.

      38
      4
    • Anonymous says:

      If that is in accordance with the law set by the Cayman Islands Government, in accordance with the Constitution, and in Accordance with the Bill of Rights, then so be it.

      The problem is – it won’t be. And you literally cannot afford the consequences of 1,000 unlawful denials.

      24
      5
    • Anonymous says:

      We need to balance the uneducated unemployable population with some new Caymanians who can contribute to the betterment of our society.
      As it stands Cayman is spiraling into a lawless state due to the imported Jamaican culture of drugs crime and baby mamas, and certain politicians are using this to stay in power.

      38
      7
    • Anonymous says:

      You sound like one of those people who want to walk through the gate and then close it behind them.

      7
      6
    • Anonymous says:

      Don’t worry 2.11 the carefully selected government appointed board will see to that.
      Unless they are supporters of Mac, Saunders ,Seymour ,Kenneth or Jamaicans.

      12
      2
    • Anonymous says:

      We’ll just litigate.
      Welcome to the real world folks.

      14
      18
      • Anonymous says:

        In that case Cayman Islands can retrospectively change the law. If the UK can do it so can Cayman.

        20
        3
        • Anonymous says:

          The Cayman Islands can’t change Human Rights – leaders keep trying and failing expensively, without learning the lesson. Time and time again.

          3
          16
    • Anonymous says:

      Found the low IQ decel.
      Not over-populated, just managed by people with sub-80 IQs. You are clearly in that bracket.

      17
      38
      • Anonymous says:

        lmao only an incel would refer to someone as a decel

        25
        3
      • Overpopulated says:

        Ha ha ha I have something you all want & will never get – STATUS! 😛 Why do una want to be Caymanian sooooooooo bad????!! Is it that bad where you come from?

        24
        2
    • Anonymous says:

      Perhaps they shouldn’t have been granted PR in the first place, eh? We let go of any reasonable standards more than a decade ago.

      23
      5
    • Anonymous says:

      Cayman Kind?

      19

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