Four drunk drivers arrested in a single morning

| 06/06/2024 | 53 Comments

(CNS): Police are urging motorists not to drive under the influence of drugs and alcohol to stop the “carnage on our roads” after four people were arrested on suspicion of driving while drunk early Saturday morning. Police officers on Cayman Brac arrested a 19-year-old woman on suspicion of DUI and a 52-year-old man for failing to provide a specimen after the two collided on Cotton Tree Bay Road at around 2:20am that morning.

The man, who was driving a Jeep, was unhurt. The woman, who was driving a Honda, received minor injuries and was taken to Faith Hospital by ambulance for treatment.

Around the same time on Grand Cayman, officers observed a vehicle travelling along Cypros Road that came to a stop in the vicinity of Kennedy Drive. The vehicle remained stationary with the lights on and the engine running for several minutes. When the officers approached, they found the driver asleep at the wheel.

When he was awoken and spoken to by the officers, he appeared to be under the influence of alcohol. A roadside breath test produced a reading of over three times the legal limit. The 52-year-old George Town resident was arrested on suspicion of DUI.

Earlier that same morning, just before 1:50am, police officers who responded to a report of a single-vehicle collision on South Church Street near Denham Thompson Way found that the driver had left the scene. However, a short while later he was located nearby carrying a small bag. While speaking to the officers, he began behaving aggressively, making threats and damaging a phone belonging to one of them. The officer detected the scent of alcohol on his breath.

The 24-year-old Bodden Town resident was arrested on suspicion of leaving the scene of an accident, DUI, and damage to property. But as he was handcuffed, he continued to be aggressive and attempted to evade arrest, causing minor injury to himself and one of the officers. When the officers searched his bag, they found a substance suspected to be ganja. He was then arrested on suspicion of possession and consumption of ganja, threatening violence, disorderly conduct, and assaulting police.

Superintendent Roje Williams said the incidents served as a reminder for drivers to refrain from getting behind the wheel under the influence of any alcohol or drugs.

“All of the drivers involved are now facing court proceedings and various potential penalties,” he said. “However, it is only due to chance that their actions did not result in more serious and life-changing consequences, such as serious injury to themselves and other road users or, in the worst case, lives being lost. As a community, we must urgently change our attitudes to driving under the influence if we are ever to see less carnage on our roads.”


Share your vote!


How do you feel after reading this?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Tags: , , , , ,

Category: Local News

Comments (53)

Trackback URL | Comments RSS Feed

  1. Trecia B says:

    It’s time for the high society socialites to be arrested leaving their favorite waterholes especially those getting totally $#%@face and jumping into their Benz’s Tesla’s Audi ‘s lock them UP Cayman let them face justice too! tr

    7
    1
  2. Anonymous says:

    blood test is only thing courts zccept…i had a prominent man destrpy my parked vehicle…he was breathalized….when it got to court…thrown out as wasnt blood? he walked free…i outta car

    3
    3
  3. Anonymous says:

    Cayman. Where Sleeping Policemen are the only kind that work.

    13
  4. Cheese Face says:

    The reality is that these islands are largely run by corrupt, brainless, morons in order to keep 60 or so Taxi Drivers happy. Think about that for a minute. Can’t loose those priceless wotes!

    18
    2
    • Anon says:

      And, arguably, the 60 or so taxi drivers are some of the worst drivers on the roads. No signaling, non existent roundabout knowledge, consistently using cell phones whilst driving and general lack of attention. They speed when empty and travel too slow when carrying overpaying passengers. Each should be tested annually. The taxi situation is truly appalling

      11
  5. Anonymous says:

    Nationalities of these people please? If not locals or status holders then deport them their @ss back to where they came from. If local, then ban them, fine their @ss big time and crush their car!

    14
    1
  6. SSM345 says:

    Whilst there were 4 drivers netted for DUI on a Saturday night (2 in Brac and 2 on the mainland; 1 of which was caught because they crashed; if they hadn’t they would have made it home) this is nothing to praise the RCIPs for….there are thousands who drive whilst intoxicated on a daily/nightly basis.

    The new limit now allows 2 beers if that and the number of drivers caught seems to be less than that when the limit was .100. The number of drinkers in Cayman has increased since then and all the bars are still packed from 5pm onwards; 7 days a week. Yet it business as normal in terms of people drinking and driving.

    There is no enforcement nor deterrent for people to drink and drive in Cayman until they are caught. That’s another fact. The drivers do not care. Alcoholics are selfish and care about nobody but themselves and their next drink.

    The RCIPS do nothing but for the month of December to curb DUI’S. Yet another fact.

    The RCIPs presence on our roads speaks volumes because there is none. From the daily crashes, to the litany of other driving offenses committed, that you can witness on your way to work at the beginning of each day, let alone during the day or once the sun goes down.

    The RCIPs need to pull their fingers out their a**.

    Drinking is a national sport in Cayman and tat will never change. Expecting those who drink to be responsible is never going to happen.

    11
    2
    • Anonymous says:

      speak for yourself. I rarely go out any more. I like to drink wine with dinner but if I can’t drive and can NEVER get some POS van/taxi home then I’d rather stay home.

    • Anonymous says:

      Drugs are illegal too you know.

      4
      1
    • Anonymous says:

      Agree with all except the second to last line — lowbrow and unnecessary. Like it or not, we need the RCIPS. Think how they feel: like it or not, they need us to help.

      Have you helped lately? Why not?

      5
      11
      • Anonymous says:

        Police have never once helped me to do my job (or with anything at all, if I am being perfectly honest.) Why should I be helping them with something they are already overpaid for?

        If every civilian can identify the problem areas, and who the high-profile repeat offenders are, why can’t the police?

  7. Anonymous says:

    Drink driving is just as dangerous as the speeders every morning just before rush hour. Not one single cop ever. These hondas are being driven by morons every single morning!

    16
    • Anonymous says:

      Plenty more than Hondas. Lots of mommy and daddy piloted Kia, Hyundai, Ford, Chevy, Changan, Toyota SUVs and trucks driven by maniacs with no dayglo shirts on.

      Just easy to blame the poor Jamaicans.

      • Anonymous says:

        Just because you’re poor, doesn’t give you the right to drive like a maniac. If you are poor and drive like that you obviously have zero sense because when you wreck your car, you have even less money!

  8. Anonymous says:

    Another suggestion would be to make it mandatory to be breathalyzed on site when your car strikes a light pole , you know , like in the Bodden Town area ?
    Without the officer at the site of the collision making his own determination as to intoxication level.

    15
  9. Anonymous says:

    Good. I like my little bit of drink, but I’m mature enough to do it at home. Many, MANY of us go out to eat and drink at bars, and end up overstaying and then driving home. No problem, right? Nope, not until somebody gets hurt.

    I wish the RCIPS could camp out outside bars, especially on Friday and Saturday nights. They used to walk through them in the old days. I think they have been discouraged from setting up camp outside bars and pulling over suspicious drivers. If so, they should be given full reign to do as they wish. This is a serious problem. It always has been.

    Just a decade or so ago, police would walk through bars, and cut people off who should have been cut off by the servers, and watch those leaving the establishments. They would chase people out of the parking lots after the bars/clubs had closed. What has changed and why?

    12
    1
  10. Anonymous says:

    The problem is nothing is done to these selfish people. Apart from a short driving ban and maybe a requirement to attend AA for a couple of sessions they get away with it. Take for example the XXXX who so far has 4 DUI;s to his name. He is currently driving around whilst awaiting his 5. He has lost his license multiple times but kept his job. He is a danger to himself and every other road user and should never be allowed to drive again.

    11
  11. Anonymous says:

    Better yet, become a politician, hit a light pole and call the premier. No breathalyser required.

    15
  12. Anonymous says:

    What about that Italian waiter who was ran over and killed by a DUI/hit and run 2 years ago?

    22
    2
  13. Anonymous says:

    They were putting themselves at risk and all other road users too. The death, destruction, damages, detours and delays on our roads due to collisions is something that we should all be concerned about… and something that we should be able to improve upon.

    17
  14. Anonymous says:

    If you’re an alcoholic, and many in Cayman are, leave the car at home. Drunk people have no business behind the wheel. Taxi pricing is not an acceptable defensive argument for planning ahead of time to drive drunk. Ask around and find a taxi driver you like, and keep their card details in your phone, Give them the contract and itinerary for the whole night and you can drink all you want, and always get home, without killing yourself or anyone else. You’ll find that there is quite a lot of personal discretion in what they charge loyal repeat customers. If you’re part of a group, just hire a bus driver for an agreed sum for the entire night, and they’ll be there waiting for you all, taking all the transport stress out of the evening plan for everyone. If you aren’t doing this, you’re a rookie.

    10
    2
  15. Hoping says:

    Thank you RCIPS. Recently there SEEMS to be an improvement all around with detection and arrests for Drugs, Traffic and Guns. Now lets take it up a notch, Gambling and Prostitution.
    The population of these Islands cannot fill a football stadium, so lets clean it up. Good start, now lets finish it for we all deserve peace and tranquility.
    You do not need anymore $$$$ just increase your Commitment. As a people we also must help.

    18
  16. Anonymous says:

    Driving drunk is arguably as dangerous as being arrested for carrying an unauthorized gun.
    Sentencing for DUI should act as a severe deterrent to the public BUT also the guilty party should be given a community service order of 1 year to walk along the main roads in Cayman with a fluorescent yellow and red vest while picking up trash along the highways. Yellow representing caution ⚠️ to the drivers on the roads and red representing blood the reckless risk for injuries or killing someone due to drunk driving. At the same time cleaning up Cayman and not costing the Cayman Government money other than the vest, gloves, hat 🧢 and garbage bags.
    On the other hand Cayman restricting affordable Uber and Lift could reduce this DUI issue in Cayman.

    16
    3
  17. Anonymous says:

    no excuse for drink driving and all offences should come with a $10,000 fine.
    However cig is responsible too…they have no late night public transport options, they have banned uber….and rely on a garbage, rip-off taxi service to try and get people home.
    wonderland stuff.

    59
    4
    • Anonymous says:

      Seriously, make proper adult plans if you are a heavy binge drinker, and plan to go out partying. Those that ritually fork out >$200 for an evening out in Cayman, drinking to annihilation, can bloody well factor $25-50 for a safe ride home, camp at a friend’s house, or walk. Traffic fine should really be Criminal charges, forfeiture of license, permit/PR temporary status, and 3 years in prison/probationary parole, with lifetime points against future insurance – because driving around drunk is a serious character flaw. Do you even know what surge pricing on an Uber at bar close would look like in Cayman, or does mom and dad credit card pay those? Grow up.

      8
      5
      • Anonymous says:

        Agree, however can’t walk here no more in the wee hours, bro. No, you get knocked in the head for that. So things have to change. People just looking for a good time are taking LESS OF A CHANCE DRIVING DRUNK than they are using alternative methods to get home. There is the crux of the problem.

      • Anonymous says:

        I would agree with you if it were actually possible to get a cab. I’ve walked 5 miles home too many times to mention and rarely see a single car on my way. we need proper user. stop the taxi scammers.

    • Anonymous says:

      yeah there are little resources on how to get home after going on. There needs to be readily available and functional option for people to pick if they want this to be reduced. fact is people are going to go out and fact is they need to get home after.
      As much as you want to say have a DD or call a friend the reality is that there needs to be resources readily available. and no, not the terrible $60 taxi cabs to go 4 miles.

      16
    • Island Time says:

      How True. I have paid the price more than once to cab drivers that rip you off. They really do need to Bring in meters in cabs like the rest of the world. The old days of a hand shake are long gone on the Cayman Islands when it comes to Taxi service.

      29
    • Anonymous says:

      I always take a bus home, the problem I have is that when I wake up in the morning, I can’t remember where I got it from.

  18. Anonymous says:

    The primary fix for drunk driving is providing drinkers attractive transportation alternatives.

    No one wants to spend $150 on a taxi home, and relying on the public bus system is laughable given no set schedules.

    Harsher penalties only write headlines, they don’t cause change.

    57
    8
    • Anonymous says:

      Feet? Or book a driver for the night? Know thineself.

      2
      8
    • Anonymous says:

      How about self-responsibility? Your ‘fix’ is simply enabling drunks to be safer drunks. That may sound good, but drunks are not known for making sound decisions, so your ‘fix’ is doomed for failure. I would prefer measures to encourage self-responsibility – like a mandatory 5 day jail and 30 hrs of community service assisting with crash cleanup!

      5
      9
    • Anonymous says:

      Bruh, face some responsibility and accountability and do not drink and drive. And refrain from consuming alcohol if you know you can’t handle liquor. Just because it’s legal and available does not mean drinking is for everyone.

      7
      3
    • Anonymous says:

      Bullshit. The fix is growing up.

      1
      1
  19. anonymous says:

    So four drunk drivers who were arrested because they either crashed or police stumbled across them, they literally handed themselves in.
    For a second I hoped that these arrests were because the police were taking a pro-active stance and pulling over and breathalyzing those driving like morons.

    You could catch 10 people drunk driving every single night.

    59
    1
  20. Island Time says:

    Amazing what you can find when you go out and do traffic policing at night. Who would have thought.

    36
    4
  21. Anonymous says:

    If RCIP camped out by the Brac eateries at lunchtime on most weekdays and conducted breath tests on those coming out, most of the local Civil Service would have to be sent home. In taxis.

    45
    1
    • Anonymous says:

      Not just lunchtime, at the places that serve alcohol. We have a problem, and it’s not just on the Sister Islands.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.