Another record toppled as permits climb to  37,437

| 14/05/2024 | 57 Comments
Cayman News Service

(CNS): The latest statistics supplied to a local law firm by WORC revealed that, as of 18 April, there were 37,437 work permits in effect in the Cayman Islands, which is up by 465 since March and yet another record. Jamaicans still comprise the biggest group of foreign workers at 15,519, or 41% of all current permits. Filipinos remain the second largest nationality at 6,323 (16.8%), but Indian nationals are now the third biggest group at 2,078 (5.55%), pushing those from the UK into fourth with 2,057.

The numbers come just a few weeks after the Economics and Statistics Office published the fall Labour Force Survey results from October, which showed that local unemployment figures have increased significantly.

The Cayman Islands Government has remained silent on the growing unemployment rate for Caymanians, which is now all the more troubling for Labour Minister Dwayne Seymour and his UPM colleagues as they have failed to address the issue of why the number of foreign workers in the country has reached an unprecedented high while more than 1,100 locals are out of work.

In an email circular updating their clients who are waiting on permanent residency and Caymanian status applications, HSM said it was not surprising to see the increase in the number of Indians coming to work here but noted that this impacts the points available for nationality on PR applications.

“If your nationality holds over 10% of work permits held, then no points will be given; over 5%, five points will be given; and under 5%, ten points will be given,” the lawyers said in their update to clients.

They also revealed that the time for status applications to be determined has dropped dramatically from nearly two years in March to just one year. They said that the Caymanian Status and Permanent Residency Board appeared “determined to clear the current backlog and ensure that what had become potentially an unlawful situation will no longer exist”.

There are currently 867 status applications outstanding, 422 of them based on naturalisation; another 251 applications are based on marriage; the remaining 194 relate to various other types of status applications, such as by descent.

The lawyers said that WORC had also processed 61 applications for a Residency and Employment Rights Certificate based upon marriage to a RERC holder or being a dependant of a RERC holder. They concluded 71 applications for a RERC based upon the points system and 48 applications based on marriage to a Caymanians.


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Category: Jobs, Local News

Comments (57)

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  1. Anonymous says:

    Ans how many of these are “fake jobs”. I’m so tired of people looking for “someone to take out a permit” so then they can move here and then look for a job.

    And the worst is the companies that charge these people $1500 to “take out a permit for them” and then they move here, work for three months, then get laid off and the company does the same thing for the next person.

  2. Anonymous says:

    From a recent BBC article about Singapore: “at the price of increasing unhappiness at rising inequality, the higher presence of foreigners, competition for jobs, congestion and the potential erosion of citizenship identity.”

    Now if Singapore, which by all accounts actually has a world class civil service and educated and qualified politicians, can’t solve these issues, then what chance does Cayman have?

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    • Anonymous says:

      Yeah but Singapore doesn’t have our dream team including..

      Jonjon’s “talents and experience”.
      Saunder’s desire to promote Jamaican culture.
      Kenneth’s modesty and remarkable business know how.
      Juju’s personal speed dial connection to God.
      Mac’s unquestionable integrity in all matters.
      All supported by a frugal civil service with selfless dedication to service.

      What could possibly go wrong.?

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  3. Anonymous says:

    Congratulations Wayne and Julianna, under your collective horse trading and “eenie meenie mannie mo” style of selection from the chosen band of idiots, under your umbrella the Cayman Islands have become “Likkle Jam”. Maybe unna coco tea will be on the other side when Dr Roy greets unna on arrival.

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    • Anonymous says:

      You miss the bigger issue, who voted in the “chosen band of idiots”? Wayne could only work with the gang that was provided by the voters.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Wayne was limited to the band of idiots because he refused to work with those who were not quite as idiotic and thought he could control the rabble.

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        • Anonymous says:

          And did he not rule the PPM for many election cycles too? What happened there?

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          • Anonymous says:

            Hmmm… obviously he didn’t rule the PPM. Otherwise he’d still be ruling them. Everyone knows that Kurt and Alden still rule the PPM. Roy is just a nice figurehead, better than Joey Who and his Jamaican/big developer backers. Still, I have to admit, it was probably better to stick with the devil we knew than to give the reins to this group of jokers, who are easily the worst government these islands have ever seen.

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  4. Anonymous says:

    Addiction to Cheap Labour is driven by selfish greed!

    The Cayman Islands, famed for its thriving financial sector, grapples with the repercussions of its reliance on cheap labor. This piece delves into the adverse impacts of prioritizing the interests of the merchant class over environmental and social welfare, elucidating how the influx of inexpensive laborers has strained the economy and exacerbated societal challenges.

    Economic Strain:

    The integration of cheap labor, primarily to bolster profits for the merchant class, has paradoxically inflicted economic strain on the Cayman Islands. Despite the initial allure of inexpensive workforce, the long-term ramifications reveal a stark reality. The thousands of laborers contribute marginally to the economy, and when factoring in the substantial remittances sent back to their home countries annually, their net contribution becomes negative. This scenario paints a picture of economic dependency rather than prosperity, as the islands struggle to balance the influx of workers with the costs of infrastructure development and social services.

    Infrastructure Burden:

    The influx of cheap laborers has placed an immense burden on the Cayman Islands’ infrastructure. Essential services such as roads, hospitals, fire, prison, waste management, and policing facilities are strained to their limits, necessitating continual expansion and improvement. The cost of maintaining and upgrading these services falls disproportionately on the local government and taxpayers, exacerbating financial strain and diverting resources from other critical areas of development. Consequently, the pursuit of cheap labor to maximize profits for the merchant class translates into a heavy toll on the islands’ infrastructure and fiscal stability.

    Social and Environmental Consequences:

    Beyond economic implications, the reliance on cheap labor has exacerbated social and environmental issues within the Cayman Islands. The influx of impoverished laborers perpetuates socioeconomic disparities, exacerbating social tensions and widening the gap between the affluent and the marginalized. Moreover, the environmental impact of accommodating a growing population poses significant challenges, straining natural resources and threatening the delicate ecological balance of the islands. The unchecked exploitation of both human and environmental resources underscores a disregard for the well-being of Caymanian society and its natural heritage.

    Political Influence and Accountability:

    Central to this narrative is the undue influence exerted by the merchant class, who not only benefit from cheap labor but also wield considerable political power. Acting as an unofficial cabinet, they manipulate political decisions to safeguard their economic interests, perpetuating a cycle of exploitation and inequality. This collusion between the merchant class and local politicians undermines democratic principles and erodes public trust, exacerbating existing socio-economic disparities and hindering efforts to address the root causes of the islands’ challenges.

    Conclusion:

    In conclusion, the Cayman Islands grapples with the multifaceted impacts of its reliance on cheap labor to satisfy the profit motives of the merchant class. The economic strain, infrastructure burden, social disparities, environmental degradation, and political influence collectively underscore the urgent need for reform. Addressing these challenges requires a holistic approach that prioritizes long-term sustainability, social equity, and environmental stewardship over short-term gains for the privileged few. Only through concerted efforts to hold accountable those who exploit cheap labor and perpetuate systemic injustices can the Cayman Islands chart a path towards a more equitable and prosperous future for all its inhabitants.

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    • Anonymous says:

      If you are eligible to run for Parliament I hope that you do.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Hold up for a second.

      You have no evidence to support the notion that these workers contribute only marginally to the local economy nor that their remittances make them a net negative influence.

      Firstly, in our consumption based taxation system it is generally accepted that lower income people bear a disproportionate amount of the tax burden. Therefor these people are paying fractionally more towards CIG revenue than a person of higher income. Secondly, the value of their remittances needs to be compared to the value of money that enters the country for their services. So, look at a hotel and how much money from foreigners it makes and how much of that cash ends up staying in Cayman thanks to the foreign labor who operate the hotels.

      You are also factually wrong that they do not contribute to infrastructure. They have cars and pay their car fees; they buy gas which has duty, they buy CUC and WAC which has duty and fees built in. They buy groceries which has duty built in. They pay rent on a home that was sold at some point and paid stamp duty. And ultimately, as noted above they pay a disproportionate amount of duty as a percentage of their salary. Meanwhile, they do not earn enough to have their kids here in our schools. They do not earn enough, nor come from the right countries to have enough points to earn PR without marriage or a Caymanian child.

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      • Anonymous says:

        The fact that they are on average paid minimum wage and considering the cost of living I think it is an accurate statement. These people earn less than the CI$2300 a month threshold to qualify for NAU assistance. What contribution are they making to the economy?
        Your comments re: consumption tax is nonsensical at best. Please explain how someone on cheap labour wages is contributing fractionally more towards CIG Revenue. Where are you getting your facts and figures from? How can you say that a cheap labour worker is more valued to the economy than say your average attorney, accountant, manager etc?
        The imported cheap labour workers are the person’s most likely to be involved in driving unlicenced and uninsured vehicles, not paying their licencing fees, stealing food from their employers shop, selling their bodies for cash, putting $5 in their tanks on the average stop at the gas station and showing up at the hospital for medical care without insurance cover while being first in line at Western Union.

        Your attempt to justify the cheap labout trade in Cayman tells me one thing!! You are benefiting from it.

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        • Anonymous says:

          ok buckaroo. Google it however you like. It is a widespread and well established fact that consumption based taxes place a higher burden as a function of income on the lower class. They buy the same gallon of gas as anyone else. So if they make $6/hr and someone else makes $60/hr the duty on the gallon of gas is the same and therefor a larger percentage of the income on the poorer person.

          Furthermore, they require significantly less government services. They CANNOT qualify for NAU. They CANNOT have their kids with them or in our schools. The fees for their cars are the same as anyone else’s so the roads is a wash (yet still proportionately higher for their income).

          Most importantly: I’m not justifying cheap labor. I’m just pointing out that your vitriol regarding poor people is inaccurate and insulting to them (and to those of us educated enough to see that you’re wrong).

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      • Anonymous says:

        Source: trust me, bro

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      • Anonymous says:

        The irony of people complaining about laborers sending remittances back home is that for more than a century, the people of the Cayman Islands survived largely due to Caymanian seamen bringing/sending money they earned overseas back to the islands.
        The work permit holders sending money back to their families in other countries live in what most of us would consider squalid conditions. We exploit them by paying them less than any Caymanian would accept and then criticize them for the way they live and the fact that they send some of their money to support their families abroad.
        The positive economic impacts of this arrangement in the Cayman Islands far outweigh any negative impacts and all it takes is for us to ignore the fact that we’re exploiting other human beings for our gain. That’s much easier to do if we look at these people as lesser deserving people than us. Of course, capitalism has always been a zero-sum game, so it’s to be expected. But let us at least acknowledge what we’re doing and why we’re doing it and maybe when we trot off to church on Sunday as good Christians, we’ll have the humility to pray for forgiveness.

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        • Anonymous says:

          Caymanians were never considered to be an “importation of poverty concern”, they worked hard on those ships and mor ethan earned their keep. Since when did we become the social services for the worlds poor?

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    • Anonymous says:

      Well all the money wanna be people love to get those cheap prices. In construction all anyone wants now are to hire the buy a work permit people as getting legitimate contractors costs them to much. Keep it rolling till the place collapses. Check your history and remember what happened to the Roman Empire. Won’t be long now.

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  5. Elvis says:

    They are professionals at this game. Fly in marry an idiot, give her a baby, then mess around with every woman they can find whilst claiming residency through marriage and child.
    Your own people are messing the island up. Then give 30,000 of them work permits no doubt . You reap what you sow

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  6. Anonymous says:

    Good news. We should see Cayman Airways profit more now on the Jamaican route.

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  7. Anonymous says:

    Good. Double it now.
    Maybe then the Cayman wet rag people will stand up and grow a backbone.
    never mind. just ship them all to Scotland!

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  8. Dana says:

    What about the Born Caymanians who needs a Certificate to Prove they are Caymanian to get a job in their Birth Country! When you only need a Cayman Passport and Naturalization to vote Ahh??
    When there is LOTS of expatriates here on Work permits with Long track records on work permits and the Caymanians cannot get a job! For sure I and more won’t be voting !!

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    • Anonymous says:

      And how exactly does an employer know the difference between someone who just says they are a born Caymanian and a real one without some evidence? You really want anyone to be able to just say hey I was born here no need for a permit? Be careful what you wish for.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Dana the problem is that being born in Cayman doesn’t make you Caymanian and we never want that to be the case because then anyone of those 37K+ people on work permits could have a Caymanian child as well. So if being born in Cayman doesn’t automatically make you a Caymanian there has to be some other way to prove it. You can prove it by providing your birth certificate and your parents nationality at the time of your birth if you think that’s easier each time, or you can get a letter form immigration proving that you are Caymanian. The choice is yours choose whichever you prefer. For me I much prefer getting the letter from Immigration.

    • Annonymous says:

      4.42pm A Cayman Passport is given if persons are naturalized and has nothing to do with being Caymanian. To vote you need Status.

  9. Anonymous says:

    interesting how government won’t allow a business have 40% of one nationality but isn’t controlling how many as a whole are here…maybe start managing this, and the loss of the Cayman culture would not be happening. Multiculturism is a good thing and leads to no dominate culture overtaking the Caymanian culture….ooops too late

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  10. Anonymous says:

    The one piece of good news here is that status applications are being processed again after years of waiting. Give the deserving people their permanent place in our society and hopefully when they vote they will make better decisions than we appear to have done in the past.
    Next step would be to allow them to take a more active role in our democracy and government, other than just voting.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Be careful what you wish for.
      Status holders include Jamaicans in large numbers. If they are let loose in “taking more active role” ..we will be ruled by Jamaicans …and that will not end well.

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      • Anonymous says:

        We are ruled by Jamaicans and it has already ended badly. You just haven’t woken up to that fact.

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    • Anonymous says:

      It will be very interesting to see which demographic’s applications sail through the process…gotta safeguard certain snouts in troughs come election time.

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    • Anonymous says:

      2:58 pm if they was so great they would stayed in their own country and built that up

  11. Anonymous says:

    Big business taking out permits for non-existent companies/jobs on this island.

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  12. Anonymous says:

    SMH!

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  13. Anonymous says:

    i wish we could replace all jamiacans with philipinos

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    • Anonymous says:

      lol. cry harder troll.

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    • Anonymous says:

      The government has to make that move.
      Unfortunately those in charge who shout “My people” the loudest are the biggest culprits in promoting the Jamaicanisation of Cayman.
      Saunders Seymour Kenneth Bryan and Mac are entirely dependent on the good will and votes of Jamaicans rich and poor.
      Get rid of them and you’ll have the beggings of the solution.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Comment of the year. Agree 10000%.

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    • Anonymous says:

      They reproduce faster than rabbits on Viagra.
      All they have to do is find some stupid 15 year old girl as their baby mama, and they have rights to stay in Cayman, because they have a Caymanian child..!

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    • Anonymous says:

      True dat, 11:05. They polite, hard working and all the girls want to do is marry old seamen and civil servants, give them babies so they can stay here. The guys don’t seem to give no problems neither, they don’t mess much with our fool fool girls they leave them to the Jamaicans to breed.

  14. Refugee Status says:

    Caymanians we need to stop this horseshit because this is going to become more and more difficult. We now need to remove those WE have elected who are facilitating this a soon as possible. This is nothing short of a displacement program now being run by those they have imported here.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Go to the weekly food bank giveaways and see how many Jamaicans are scamming the system.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Yes it is indeed Caymanians who have to stop this…but look at the Caymanians charged with that responsibility.

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  15. Anon says:

    Yes! Yes! keep bringing these people here we have lots and lots of roads and an abundance of schools and cheap housing accommodations. And the best and cheapest Health Care. And the jobs, they are so high paying that we just reinstated a holiday to remind everyone that Slavery was abolished on May 3, 1835. Whoa Yeh!

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  16. Anonymous says:

    ….And to think “This is the government for the Caymanian people”.🤫 Caymanian’s please wake-up and choose wisely at those polls come 2024, VOTE SMART, If not Cayman is going to continue the path-to-hell with no possibility of return. POOR PEOPLE WAKE-UP and LET US TAKE BACK CAYMAN FROM COOPERATE CAYMAN. Government is controlled by them.

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  17. Anonymous says:

    Proving it’s still far too easy for Caymanians to submit bogus permit applications for minimum wage dial-a-crews, without any labour-side confirmations of skills, hours, benefits. Are these guest workers under their care able to survive on what’s promised in the application, let alone the reality after they arrive? Did they have any competence in the skills as advertised on application? These are the questions that never get asked, because it seems that workforce abuse is well and truly a Caymanian birthright. The folks that will accept what Cayman pays for minimum wage is a thinning and stratified group where the throughput rate is already low and sinking lower.

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    • Anonymous says:

      9:44 am you are correct! The lawlessness in relation to labour checks is out of bounds. Franz’s world class civil service is doing nothing to catch these criminals telling lies on applications for trade and business license and work permits just to bring in their family from Jam and have NO work for them! A good example is one that Alden bestowed Caymanian Status through Cabinet who has brought all family, children, grand children and friends. Someone who was refused by the CS&PR Board as undeserving yet Alden was convinced to step in because the person had been here a long time but also saying he would get criticism for it. He knew it was wrong! This is the type of immigration injustice by political interference that is helping to ruin these islands.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Not just Alden…they are ALL guilty of looking after their friends…Mac is the biggest culprit in Cabinet status giveaways.

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  18. Anonymous says:

    CIG has completely lost control of the growth. They really have no idea how many people are here. I am sure it is well over 100,000.

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