Ministry hands out five hydroponic units

| 09/10/2023 | 18 Comments

(CNS): The Ministry of Agriculture has handed out five Flex Farms, hydroponic units that can produce a diverse range of foods efficiently and affordably all year round. According to an MoA press release, the new initiative is part of the Cayman Islands Food and Nutrition Security Policy. Five units have already been given to the Edna Moyle Primary School and Beacon Farms in the minister’s own constituency of North Side, as well as the Clifton Hunter High School and the Department of Agriculture.

The last unit will be sent to Layman Scott High School on Cayman Brac over the next few weeks. The first five Flex Farms were presented to the Cayman Islands as a grant from the Caribbean Climate-Smart Accelerator, but the ministry is exploring options to acquire additional units, which retail at around US$5,000, for other government entities.

Officials said the partnership with the CCSA is expected to benefit the local farming community and play a pivotal role in the national School Garden Programme at both primary and secondary school levels. The goal is to familiarise students with technologies and sustainable agricultural practices and introduce them to agricultural training for the first time.

According to the ministry, a single Flex Farm can produce 25 pounds of lettuce in just 28 days while occupying just nine square feet of space. After the units are plugged in and the growing has begun, the DoA will oversee the project, making sure the intended outcomes are met and providing progress updates through social media.

Agriculture Minister Jay Ebanks said the initiative would complement efforts to strengthen the food and nutrition security of the country.

Chief Officer Eric Bush said it demonstrated the ministry’s unwavering commitment to innovative solutions for the community’s needs. “By embracing the future of agriculture, we are not only securing our food supply but also laying the foundation for generations to come for the future of the Cayman Islands,” he said.

The Caribbean Climate-Smart Accelerator, which advocates for enhanced food security, sustainability, and social inclusion throughout the Caribbean, plans to extend this initiative to other countries. Flex Farms were developed by Fork Farms in the US.


Share your vote!


How do you feel after reading this?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Tags: , , , , , ,

Category: Agriculture, Business, Education, Local News

Comments (18)

Trackback URL | Comments RSS Feed

  1. J&P says:

    thank you eric Bush your haters must be feeling foolish

    2
    7
  2. Anonymous says:

    this is great… but why won’t the government give local farmers like Primitive Greens the opportunity to use more solar power, which would lower their costs so that their produce can be offered to the community at a much better price?

    Wait? Is it b/c they’re too busy giving billionare developers more duty-free concessions?

    22
    1
  3. Anonymous says:

    5000 dollars!!! I guess the government wants boujie farmers as a generation. All aboard the gravy train.

    7
    5
  4. Anonymous says:

    Just more shiny gadgets that will be used briefly and then end up in the dump. Wonder what CIG did with all the Ebola tents?

    21
    4
  5. Anonymous says:

    more of this please. if you buy them in bulk, they are only 300 wholesale each. You need to figure out supply of compost tea though which shouldn’t be hard.

  6. Anonymous says:

    This is the future.

    8
    2
  7. Anonymous says:

    Great news, get some more and utilise town halls and unused office space. Set up community farm markets. Train up some NiCE people to operate and maintain them, then we won’t have to rely on wet, rotten, wilted, pesticide ridden greens from our grocery stores.

    16
    1
  8. Anonymous says:

    Free the weed!

    23
    5
  9. Anonymous says:

    Sounds like someone going to be making lots of money.

    10

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.