PR refusals unlikely to stick, say lawyers

| 09/08/2023 | 135 Comments
WORC Director Jeremy Scott, Cayman News Service
WORC Director Jeremy Scott

(CNS): Many of the points-based applications for permanent residency that have been refused over the last year are likely to be overturned on appeal because the process leading to those decisions remains flawed, according to Nick Joseph of HSM, which specialises in immigration work. As WORC tackles the application backlog administratively, Joseph says that those who have been turned down were done so unlawfully.

In his latest email update to the dozens of clients his firm is helping through the permanent residency and Caymanian status application process, Joseph said that in 97% of the cases that HSM has dealt with that were refused, the decisions were changed on appeal due to the identification of errors.

Joseph explained that many more applications had been granted based on the exposure of those mistakes as well as the ongoing problems within the system that have not been addressed, especially the problems with the arbitrary nature of how points are awarded.

“We have succeeded in establishing an error by the authorities in approximately 97% of cases, and to date our appeals have resulted in the grant of PR, directly and indirectly, to hundreds of persons, not as a grant by the board or director of WORC, but by the Immigration Appeals Tribunal standing in their shoes,” he wrote.

For reasons that have yet to be explained, the current members of the Permanent Residency and Caymanian Status Board, who were appointed in 2021, haven’t made any decisions on applications based on the point system. The board has, however, made determinations in relation to applications for PR based on marriage.

However, since the chairman, Steve McField, was also appointed to lead a review and publish a report recommending changes to the PR system, especially the points, the board has stopped making decisions in anticipation of the report. This has been expected since last December, but in a recent appearance on Radio Cayman, McField said that the report is now due to be completed in September.

In the meantime, the decisions that have been made on PR over the last year for points-based applications were made by WORC Director Jeremy Scott and his team. According to the latest figures from WORC, there is a backlog of at least 150 points-based PR applications. Around 320 applications have been considered so far this year and 195 were granted, 114 refused and the rest deferred, according to WORC.

But based on HSM’s numbers, Joseph believes that these figures may be flawed and that many refusals will be overturned and granted by the appeals tribunal. He said that his firm continues to monitor the scoring of applications for PR when the firm receives confirmation of grants and the occasional refusals.

As a result, they are noting “material errors”, mostly relating to the underscoring of points. “Efforts to resolve the issues with the immigration authorities on behalf of all applicants are yet to bear obvious fruit,” he wrote this week. “We are hopeful for imminent change.” 

He added, “As a consequence of our review, we have a high degree of confidence that most refusals that we have seen may be unlawful. In our opinion, there is an ongoing opacity and arbitrariness in decision making — largely as a result of the lack of clear, published and consistently applied policies generally and specifically relating to the assessment of points.”

Joseph welcomed the effort that Scott and his WORC team have made to address the board’s neglect of points-based PR applications, but it is clear that resources continue to be an issue for one of the government’s busiest departments.

WORC was promised trained administrators more than five years ago, but it has not retained the full complement of staff needed to meet the workload, with only one of the original six administrators still there. Joseph told his clients that the “department plainly needs more support to assist it in its difficult and critical role”.

He noted that PR applications are now taking around 15 months — somewhat less than the more than two years some applicants were waiting until relatively recently.


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Category: Government Administration, Local News, Politics

Comments (135)

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  1. Anonymous says:

    But with so many wealthy expats obtaining PR, there’s little left for Caymanians to call home (except perhaps in the Eastern districts). Government does nothing to deal with the cost of construction and the general contractors in Cayman are minting it.

    Caymanians can’t just get up and leave to their home country, so pray tell, what is the solution to this PR dilemma? Perhaps increase the spend amount required to obtain PR?

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    • Anonymous says:

      that has more to do with the housing market and that owning a home is more or less a requirement when applying for PR.

      But a bigger problem is that our housing market is completly unregulated and the speculation on the housing market where people buy 4 appartments at once as an investment.

  2. Anonymous says:

    For the sake of NOT creating an even greater divided Cayman Islands, my two cents include:

    1. Going forward from this day/date, the CIG only grant persons, who are married to Caymanians or can show generational Caymanian connection, PR/Caymanian Status/Caymanian by birth right.

    2. Stop fearing that people will be up in arms about what laws are put in place to protector Caymanians. Let’s us face the fact, the majority who are making a big fuss right now about how long it takes them to get their PR or Status, will be the same ones get up and go about their business when Cayman is deemed not fit for their purpose. And that you can make my word on.

    3. And when these people get up and go about their business there will be the same number or greater of people lining up to take their place and do the same things, make the same fuss and utter the same slurs that such people are making at the present time.

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  3. Anonymous says:

    You joke but that’s how much they cost. The middle class aka most Caymanians are being squeezed to the max. And it’s not going to get better any time soon.

    The independent means PR people are a bigger problem than anyone thinks or realizes.

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  4. blowfish says:

    How buying your way into society is acceptable yet paying with blood, sweat, tears and hard work is frowned upon is something I’ve never understood. The effect is clear; there is nothing left for the next generation Caymanian with all the land purchased by the wealthy. Yet it is believed, that hard working expats that contribute to society are the problem and should not be allowed PR without a fight! Living in a country you never really feel like you belong to is soul crushing.
    Who will serve all the well do do’s their pudding when no one but they can afford to live here?

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    • Anonymous says:

      Yes!! Excellent comment.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Hundreds of expats have been given PR without a fight. Every person who marries a PR holder or status recipient, or even a civil servant, can get PR without really doing anything. Most people investing millions, creating jobs, covering their expenses and providing tens of thousands in import duties and charitable donations every year are MUCH more deserving.

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  5. Simple Paul Simon says:

    Simple solution. No rollover if you agree to no chance at PR.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Unfortunately human rights considerations abhor that option.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Unfortunately it doesn’t work as a matter of law. You cant contract out of basic human rights, and its well established that once you have lived somewhere 10 years or more very difficult t remove right to residence. You can roll them over before hand to avoid that – what the old 7 and then 9 year rules were about – but once CIG gave way on that because of pressure from business wanting to keep experienced staff and families wanting to keep domestic helpers, the problem with a spiraling population of long term residents, whether PR or status, was inevitable.

  6. Anonymous says:

    need to change the laws. only can get Status/permanant residence by marriage and parents and Grand Psrents. period.

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    • Anonymous says:

      3:44 = Fool!

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    • Anonymous says:

      No problem. We will just take our families, businesses and banks elsewhere.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Sounds as if the entire Worc/immigration boards need a deep clean from top to bottom. Don’t they know it is illegal to mess around with people’s human rights like this.? Most of the staff on both boards do not understand the laws and what they do depends on the mood they see in at any particular time and they have the audacity to argue their made up point ( no pun intended) if anyone disbelieve me just give them a call with a simple question- i.e if they bother to pick up the phone?.. They should be jailed.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Elsewhere like where? Hopefully not back to places you uprooted your families, businesses and banks from to relocate here to begin with?

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      • Anonymous says:

        lmfao sure you will.

      • Anonymous says:

        Is that a threat or promise?

        There are others like you just waiting in line to take your place.

        The new comers will do the same BS and like you all, too move on when the CI is not fit for their purpose as you are now claiming to do.

    • Anonymous says:

      Back to the good ol’ incestuous days where you came from.

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  7. Anonymous says:

    Higglers are starting to sell on Governors Beach – kick them off before they turn it into the dump that is Public Beach….

    Beaches are for the public – not for higglers and sellers.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Cayman = 3rd world
      Unless you live behind a gated community

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    • Anonymous says:

      Check the planning notices, they are fixing to gentrify Governor’s Beach soon now.

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    • Anonymous says:

      The hagglers are working people trying to make a living. Perhaps CIG could employ people to clean up after the public… tourists and locals that leave their trash before it is turned into a dump. Perhaps with vison and foresight there could be a lovely area for the hagglers to sell their wares and allow visitors to buy their goods, and taste the best local food and handicrafts from the hard working Cayman kind people. oh Ya but there is no land left dedicated to the public.

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  8. Anonymous says:

    The first thing that needs to be changed is the PR by independent means with the investment only being $2.5M. That number hasn’t changed in almost 15 years!! Yes property prices have gone through the roof since then. It needs to be more like $7.5 million or $10M. Every joe and their dog are coming in on this $2.5M investment now. Only thing is that Dart will never let this happen because that is the only way they sold all the Kimpton condos. Every purchaser got PR with their Kimpton condo. Embarrassing.

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    • Anonymous says:

      You know you are saying that people who pay at least CI$150,000 to the Cayman Government in stamp duty alone, provide for jobs for tens of people in construction, maintenance and sales (including furnishings). Buy cars, and pay about $100,000 every year in import duties alone, never taking a job from a Caymanian or making the government pay for their education or healthcare – are not welcome. But hundreds of impoverished persons from around the world – they are fine?

      Seriously? The rich that take nothing and contribute millions are the biggest problem with our immigration system?

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      • Anonymous says:

        Thank you! We have become the refugee center for the worlds impoversished and uneducated!!

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        • Anonymous says:

          Ask yourself who staffs our civil service, and where they are originally from? It is certainly not the UK or Kansas (or Cayman).

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          • Anonymous says:

            It is indeed Cayman. Stop talking bigoted foolishness and check statistics 12:21.

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            • Anonymous says:

              Police?
              Prison?
              Education?

              Foolishness?

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              • Anonymous says:

                Even with these included, 6:34…..that’s where most of the non Caymanians are…..the civil service is over 70% Caymanian and our pride and joys, the Post Office, CBC and Fire Service are 100% Caymanian. So yes, foolishness.

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                • Anonymous says:

                  Bullshit. Half the Caymanians in the civil service are only Caymanian because they were recently granted status – including to themselves!

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            • Anonymous says:

              Quite a fatuous comment considering how much data is available to the public. One of the largest employers of Work permit holders is the CIG/ Civil Service. It is also widely known that working for the Cayman Islands Government is one of the more lucrative employment contracts an expatriate can obtain. Guessing your new here….

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              • Anonymous says:

                And best of all, free education and healthcare for unlimited dependents – and immunity from term limits!

                The destruction of Cayman.

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              • Anonymous says:

                Go ahead and publish your readily available data proving that the Civil Service is not overwhelmingly Caymanian. I dare you.

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                • Anonymous says:

                  Easy. Check the list of MacKeevas grants. Hundreds of civil servants on there – and those are many of the Caymanian ones.

      • Anonymous says:

        Well on the negative side of ledger they do drive the costs up for real estate and goods. The more people you have who are willing to pay $12 for a pint of strawberries the more the supermarkets will continue to charge it.

        Another issue which doesn’t get talked about much is that these people don’t have to integrate into society at all. Indeed they could never speak to a Caymanian, never mind becoming a part of the community.

        At least people who obtain PR the traditional way work (for the most part) in a normal workplace and they put in 8 years before they are considered.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Congrats on finding a tax haven, gentrifying the country and creating more poverty.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Yes this is what I’m saying. The threshold needs to be much higher. The current $2.5M has led to property prices increases especially where people were allowed to buy 2 or 3 Condos to get to the $2.5 million. And yes, I agree with another poster…they don’t integrate, tend to complain about everything Caymanian and drive up ALL prices…groceries, vehicles, hair salon, you name it. Keep in mind, I am a “new” Caymanian having worked and lived here for 20 years. I can’t imagine how the multi-generational Caymanians must feel.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Oh and for the record…I don’t think this is the biggest immigration problem. Just the easiest one to fix. I’m not saying take it away. I am saying increase the threshold. $2.5M is not very much money anymore. The threshold hasn’t changed in almost 15 years.

        My thought on the biggest problem is people taking out permits and don’t have work for employees. “oh I found so and so to take out a permit for me while I look for work”

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      • Anonymous says:

        As a Caymanian, I’d rather have less people around that only bother to get to know their other imported rich friends, and be able to afford my own little house. But cheers man, thanks for making that impossible, since you have money it should be your right to take my home right?

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      • Anonymous says:

        I understand exactly where you’re coming from but the very wealthy are the reason the beaches are disappearing and Caymanian is becoming a Little Miami.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Exactly! Well said. The issue is certainly not the independent means clients (bear in mind last year the busiest ever we are talking about 50 PR approvals through IMs). These people are not the issue in fact the opposite with the amount of money they are contributing through stamp duty, approval fees, import duties, use of local services etc. Everyone knows the issue is the ease of obtaining PR through the points system and it’s over reliance on property ownership.

    • Anonymous says:

      It is think kind of thinking that is destroying Cayman. Independent means PR atracts rich people, many of them do not want to work and only want to live here in peace in a very expensive home that was constructed by local labour. They contribute to the economy because they only want to spend money. Many start businesses and hire Caymanians. But we are fighting for the poor, uneducated labourer to get PR and do what? Become a burden to the state as soon as they become a Caymanian.

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      • Anonymous says:

        But 12 dollar strawberries 🤪

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      • Anonymous says:

        7:26 am. The majority of NAU clients are imported poor people who are status holders. Which country opens its doors to poverty? Politicians craft laws to remove undesirables from our shores and help the natives, who are in need. Help your own first.

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        • Anonymous says:

          Until they stop allowing people to gain status by marriage this will never stop.

          The problem new Caymanians are not people who work here for 8 years to get PR, they’re the people who would otherwise have had almost no prospect of PR so they knock up a Caymanian and not long after you know what happens.

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  9. Anonymous says:

    Steve McField should be ashamed of himself- the quality of legal analysis that says ‘I am writing a report on potential amendments to a law, therefore l am entitled to suspend application of that law in the meantime’ is not only terrifyingly poor, but amounts to the Board treating itself as not being bound by the law because it thinks that it should be changed.

    Whilst there are not many instances in which the Governor should consider stepping in, this is clearly one of them, falling squarely within the scope of good governance.

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    • Anonymous says:

      From the time it was announced that Steve mcfield would be chairman of immigration board I know it would go from bad to worse. I suppose All of his racist rants on the talk show was how prepared himself.

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    • Anonymous says:

      I wonder if that stipulation is embedded in the law? He should be removed immediately.

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  10. Anonymous says:

    time for a class action lawsuit against cig for gross incompetence

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  11. Anonymous says:

    no such thing as accountability in cig and the civil service
    the cycle of failure and incompetence is never ending

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    • Pohan says:

      11:11. another private sector board.

      why do we keep making political appointments to boards. That selection process just doesn’t work.

      get rid of all immigration boards and allow trained civil servants to deal with applications.

      name another first world country that has immigration boards.

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  12. Anonymous says:

    If McField and the Board continue to flout the laws then litigation will inevitably ensue. This in turn, will result in many people, who otherwise would have had their PR applications legitimately denied, getting pushed through on account of human rights reasons.

    Clean up your act CIG. This is embarrassing.

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    • Anonymous says:

      And its going to be expensive as well. And only those that can afford HSMs services are even going to get to a court based decision. Sad – just sad.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Human rights issue? Ha! If that’s the case top me up with a U.A.E and Dutch passport please because it’s my human right.
      Keep up the good work for once CIG.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Have you lived, worked and contributed to the UAE and Netherlands for 10+ years?

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      • Anonymous says:

        Jeremy Scott and team are still doing their work, despite the board…

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        • Anonymous says:

          Yes and no. Processing some PR and status applications, so an improvement on the stone wall from the Board, but a fraction of those outstanding, and as Nick observes many of the rejections are not founded on the law or regulations so immediately appealable. And that’s before the dam of unprocessed applications building up, waiting for the inevitable judicial review for failure to deal with them timeously. Heading slowly but surely for a 2004 repeat.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Actually, it may be criminal. Commissioner?

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    • Anonymous says:

      All of you folks who had your applications languishing for so long should band together and write to the Governor to have him removed.

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  13. Anonymous says:

    I don’t understand how it is that the board has not been forced to explain why they have not decided on one single case in two years.

    I’m not arguing one way or another for the outcome of those decisions but this has been an issue the public knows about for about a year and still now answer from the board.

    I believe they’re all paid to sit on that board. I believe the committee to recommend changes is also being paid. How the hell is it ok that Steve is the chair of both entities and is dragging everything out like this and clearly not doing the job he’s being paid for?

    None of them are doing what they’re supposed to do and I have no idea how that’s acceptable. What the actual hell are we going to do when people who shouldn’t get PR through points end up getting it through a human rights lawsuit???

    Where is the transparency and accountability Wayne?

    What the actual F is going on?

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    • Anonymous says:

      Saunders put Steve on the board because he is a constituent and influential among a certain demographic. Jon Jon has the same view because BTW is right next door. Steve loves to cavort with the Government (Party in Power) and will do their bidding without question. In the end he gets to make public appearances, talk about foreigners and influences Government decisions. Its all nepotism and eating at the trough behaviour and will continue until we reform how these boards are appointed and how people are elected.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Let’s face it “Demographic” means Jamaican, and that clearly is what they all have in common.
        Promoting the future interests of that particular Demographic seems to be the mindset of the Bodden town bredren dem, as they take down the rest of Cayman.

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      • Anonymous says:

        10:08, best analysis of Steve McField I’ve read in 50 years.

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      • Anonymous says:

        need to change the laws. only can get Status/permanant residence by marriage and parents and Grand Psrents. period.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Steve, who is wont to remind us that he is the most senior lawyer in Cayman, has a plan so cunning you could pin a tail on it and call it a weasel.

      He’s not going to deal with any PR applications until he has issued the new rules for granting PR. Which will make it impossible to get PR unless its based on a marriage approved by Steve’s board to make sure its the “right” kind of marriage. Then he is going to hear all the applications but refuse them all based on the new criteria. Completely ignoring the case law on the point where the former Chief Justice had already handed down a decision indicating that applications had to be dealt with based on the regulations in place at the time of application, not when the matter was finally heard.

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    • Anonymous says:

      What is going on is the civil service , to do nothing, get paid and rewarded for doing nothing. Then get a Silverado tossed in for good work.

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  14. Anonymous says:

    Would be interesting to find out if the individuals on the PR & Status Board have been getting paid for the last 2 years whilst sitting on their hands and ignoring legitimate applications.

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    • Anonymous says:

      To be fair he has been very busy conducting an inquisition into marriage based claims and the review of electoral boundaries. There’s only so many hours in the day and so many meetings you can attend, you know 😉

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    • Anonymous says:

      Boards only get paid when they meet.

      In this case meet to hear PR by marriage applications. So see, by not meeting to hear all those other applications they’re saving us money. :-}

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      • Anonymous says:

        If only that were true. There are using all the scheduled meetings to debate the marriage applications. Same amount paid – just very little production. Meantime the PR and status applications are scheduled to be heard on days the board doesn’t meet, like public holidays, so the poor lambs aren’t overworked.

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  15. Anonymous says:

    #worldclassmyass!
    😂 😂 😂 😂

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  16. Anonymous says:

    Looks like Jeremy got hung out to dry?

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  17. Anonymous says:

    The backlog, the backlog…. blah blah…. WORC is a just a place full of lazy ass people with a horrible attitude.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Go back to your country things are fantastic there…. WE OWE YOU ALL NOTHING!!!

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      • Anon says:

        Let me guess as a Caymanian your entitled to a British passport! Double standards right!

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        • Anonymous says:

          Ummm, Caymanians are NOT entitled to British passports.

          Only persons who were BOTC’s in 2003 are.

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          • Anonymous says:

            Caymanians (in the same way as Permanent Residents through the points system) can apply to be naturalised as BOTCs and immediately thereafter get a Cayman passport (if they don’t already have one) and immediately upon its receipt apply to be registered as a British Citizen and obtain a full British passport.

      • Anonymous says:

        Back in your box, bigot!

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      • Anonymous says:

        A perfect example of the mindset of those in WORC, hence why they all have a screw up face when you go in for anything.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Actually, we owe everyone fair treatment in accordance with our laws.

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  18. Anonymous says:

    It’s a #shitshow. Ineptitude, couched in bureaucracy, and tainted by nepotism. But still a shitshow.

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  19. Anonymous says:

    Why can’t they get this right so people who are turned down stay turned down? The whole island is being taken over by outsiders, that is big part of the problems here now. The politicians just seem to want to kiss up to everyone instead of being firm and enforcing the laws. HSM must be making a killing off of the bad decisions by our civil servants.

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    • Anonymous says:

      The people being turned down are being turned down because of errors made by WORC not because they don’t actually qualify.

      The problem is with the way the points system works. If that can be fixed to raise the bar for obtaining PR then the government can achieve its aim of reducing the number of PR grants.

      Failing to apply the law as written can’t be acceptable. Government has to follow the laws – doing anything else undermines the legitimacy and reputation of the Cayman Islands.

      I don’t understand why they don’t change the system. Then again I also don’t understand how the dump fiasco has been ongoing for 30+ years.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Politicians don’t write the laws, the Legal Department does. Do you think the laws are in favor of us or against us. Too many loop holes and they are all boring through.

        • Anonymous says:

          And where is the legal Department from?
          And which nationalities are diving through the carefully dispersed loopholes and putting their children through government schools and healthcare for free?
          And which sector of the expatriate community is entirely exempt from term limits, dependents fees, and work permit fees?

  20. Please Refuse says:

    The ‘imminent change’ which is necessary is a cessation of overpopulation for the sake of the greedy few at the expense of all.

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  21. Anonymous says:

    Jeremy DOT you I’s and CROSS your T’s my friend! they will try anything to over-run this island. There aint no need for more PR its time to close the door and let us blossom again! Any politician not standing with you on this WE the people shall vote out! so ya’ll that ready this better stand in unison with this man!

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    • Anonymous says:

      We do need more people like Jeremy. That is for certain. But his job, and that of his Department, is to fairly, effectively, and robustly apply the law. It seems others are preventing him from doing so.

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    • Anonymous says:

      How are you going to “blossom again” when you’ve sold most of the land that was your birthright and subject your children to sub-par education? Things have changed forever, and you have been the architect of that change. Accept it and work with the change you made, not against it. If you fail to do so, accept the fact that you will take your unhappiness, sense of entitlement and bitterness to your grave, as well as leaving those emotions as the new birthright for your children.

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      • Anonymous says:

        the entitled are people such as yourself who leave YOUR birth right and come to seek others. Whats more entitled than showing up in someone’s country under the guise of work, with the full intention of never leaving.

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        • Anonymous says:

          Yes, what could be more entitled than expecting somewhere to apply its immigration laws in the way that they are written? Outrageous.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Who is they?! Caymanians make the rules. From development to PR grants, that fact seems to be too painful to swallow for most.

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      • Anonymous says:

        I think the problem is we make the rules and then don’t follow them.

        Unfortunately, CIG then gets taken to court, has their ass handed to them repeatedly and it costs all of us a lot of money!

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      • Anonymous says:

        Nope. Major players in setting these rules are not Caymanian.

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  22. Anonymous says:

    Shameful conduct in the part of the Chairman and the PR Board. Their job is to determine applications based on the merits prescribed by the law. Instead, they have unilaterally decided to dig their heels in and mess with peoples lives by putting a moratorium on decisions – since 2021.

    Where is the Dwayne Seymour and why hasn’t he stepped in here as the minister in charged with overseeing border control and labor?

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  23. Anonymous says:

    Just change the immigration law to make immigration more difficult similar to larger countries that discourage immigration and that are revamping immigration to make it difficult due to issues with the large immigration influx or actually enforce the immigration law instead of rubber stamping work permits.

    Or just suggest they all move to Canada. Canada wants immigrants. Go there.

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  24. Anonymous says:

    Dear Nick

    How can WORC accept an application for PR and then the Board not deal with it in anticipation of new regulations? those applications were submitted subject to the current Regulations, not the regulations MR McField is anticipating will be adopted by Cabinet! If they refuse any applications that were submitted prior to the new Regulations, is that also an appeal ground ?

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    • Anonymous says:

      They did it before. In 2015, 2016, 2017. They assured us it would never happen again.

      Wash, rinse, repeat.

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  25. Anonymous says:

    The way expats are treated in their legitimate way through the system is a national embarrassment. I have a good friend and his wife who came to our islands from the UK 17 yrs ago. Despite working a minimum wage job our Caymanians aren’t interested in doing, they have worked hard, saved hard, made a life for themselves here. They’ve spent tens of thousands on work permit fees, immigration fees and expenses, lawyer fees, medical fees, PR fees, naturalization fees, status fees, more PR fees, more lawyer fees etc.
    And still don’t have status. Once the husband is granted his, then the wife has to apply for hers, now being married to a Caymanian. They have another 3 years + ahead of them until its completed. 20 years! Tens of thousands of dollars. They are more deserving of being called Caymanian than many of the layabouts and criminals born on our shores and claiming it by birth. I am all for limiting the number of expats on the island and supporting our own into better jobs, but for good people who have made a life here in the community and are deserving the path should be easier for them, instead of the constant hurdles and delays thrown in their way.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Sorry to hear, but know that this is not a new issue. Many before you that have been here for 3 or 4 decades are still only having their applications properly checked out now. So, that being said – you will have to wait your turn like those before you, or……………not.

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    • Ima Speak says:

      I am sure you know that nobody gets to choose for themselves where they are born, right? And nobody is born with the choice to be a “layabout or criminal”, life turned them that way or they made that decision…well, that being said, everyone have a decision to live here or elsewhere and if your friends from the UK didn’t think it was much better for them to live here in Cayman, no matter the cost “tens of thousands” or two pennies then I’m sure they would’ve quit long ago and moved on!! I know for a fact that no one who choose to move and live here in the Cayman Islands don’t see it as a huge benefit to them…and they do it at whatever the cost, be it $$$ or a jail sentence or a grave plot. And I am not being insensitive here, just stating the facts. There are plenty of places in the World that is just as nice to live and have far more benefits to afford to persons than Cayman…or I guess not. So, trust me as bad as it may seem for your friends, they see it as something they have to incur to have the benefit of living in the Cayman Islands. I feel sorry that they have to spend all this money after working a minimum wage job and saving so hard for it to be paid out on the PR delays and hurdles, but I have to do the same living here every day with this high cost of living and still see the great benefit with living on this beautiful Grand Cayman island. I am grateful to be called Caymanian and see the blessings of these islands though the downs and ups we go through. I would not exchange it for nowhere else in the World and thanks to those who gave me the opportunity to call here home. I do hope no one ever tells me I have to leave here because then I would only have one place I’d rather be and that’s Heaven!

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      • Ima speak out my back... says:

        Or they made the mistake of throwing good money and time after bad as they foolishly thought the CIG would follow their own laws…

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  26. Anonymous says:

    The backlog is more than 150. If 40 are applying each month, it is closer to 600. Many of those persons have dependents, who will themselves get PR upon the grant to a parent/spouse. The numbers of people being deprived PR at present would appear to be more than 1,000. Perhaps much more.

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    • Corruption is endemic says:

      WORC appears to think a backlog is when an application is over a year old…

      Can’t make this stuff up. If the politicians and I guess the people want a different system, then make changes to the law.

      Until then everyone will eventually get sorted by the current rules it is terrible that courts and tribunals need to be involved.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Wait. So they are not telling the truth? Does that mean they are not meeting to decide my application on 25 December?

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        • Anonymous says:

          Oh you as well? My date was Christmas Day last year. Now it’s Christmas Day this year. I certainly hope it will be decided by Christmas Day next year. And every year this drags out they demand that we pay another yearly fee that shouldn’t be payable if they just processed the damned paperwork in good time.

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          • Anonymous says:

            Governor. Do you not see this as a shakedown?

            Stand, and deliver. Your money or your life? (Well, if not your life, your house, your livelihood, your friends,…- and best of all, all unlawful).

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