7MB pressure grows as hotel buses guests north

| 05/01/2023 | 200 Comments
  • Cayman News Service
  • Cayman News Service
  • Cayman News Service
  • Cayman News Service

(CNS): Seven Mile Beach is coming under even more pressure as the impact of erosion and the lack of access begins to bite. This holiday season the Grand Cayman Marriott Beach Resort has been transporting guests by minibus to a stretch of the beach owned by the Dart Group, north of the Kimpton Seafire Resort, because the beach at the hotel has completely gone.

With no sand at all in front of the Marriott, general manager Hermes Cuello said that leasing a stretch of Dart’s beach along the old West Bay Road for its guests was a temporary solution. Along this stretch, Marriott staff manage the lounge chairs and towels and offer a mobile food and drink service, and guests have access to chemical toilets.

Cuello told CNS that the pop-up beach was not a sustainable long-term solution and was already proving very costly, but for the time being, it was “a sufficient solution” to the immediate problem for the beachless hotel. Cuello said the Marriott had seen a number of high-season cancellations and people were complaining about the situation.

However, guests who spoke to CNS at the site on Wednesday said the hotel had been transparent about the lack of beach, and while it was not the same experience as the beachfront hotel they had hoped for, it was a beautiful spot and they were happy to be able to enjoy it.

But the situation has also caused concern for locals, given the increasing pressure on beaches as the population grows, cruise passengers return in significant numbers and more beach access is blocked as a result of development. Posts about the appearance of the beach umbrellas and chairs went viral on social media as Caymanians pointed out that they are losing access everywhere, especially to their own world-famous beach.

As local people are squeezed between the vendors catering to cruise passengers on Public Beach and the developers who do all they can to curb access to beaches in front of their luxury properties, there are concerns that by leasing this stretch of beach, which is particularly popular with locals, the Marriott will be pushing them out from the spot, even at weekends.

Although Cuello said they are not stopping people from entering the beach area, the chairs and umbrellas are for guests only. With more than two dozen loungers laid out along the water’s edge, the space for locals is certainly reduced, compounding the pressure along the whole of Seven Mile Beach as the space available to all decreases.

The beach erosion that has impacted the Marriott covers well over a mile of the southern end of Seven Mile Beach, from Plantation Village to Coral Beach Bar, which still has some sand and is now packed with beach chairs and umbrellas to service cruise ship passengers. Beach erosion is the result of rising sea levels, changing weather patterns and excessive development far too close to the sea, including hard structures such as bars and cabanas, pools and decks.

Property owners who have benefited financially from building too close to the water but are now suffering the consequences have been pressing the government to come up with a solution and want the public purse to foot the bill, a proposition that is not going down well with voters. Both Premier Wayne Panton and Tourism Minister Kenneth Bryan have acknowledged the issue and are considering options for beach replenishment, but there are concerns that this will not work.

The government has previously indicated a willingness to invest $21 million to restore the lost sand along the southern end of Seven Mile Beach, but unless the properties most affected commit to retreating from the beach by moving the pools and patios causing the problem further away from the water, the money could be wasted.

There is some indication that buildings earmarked for renovation or demolition will be replaced by ones much further back but, with the single exception of Lacovia, there are no concrete plans to completely rebuild any condo complex or hotel along Seven Mile Beach in a managed retreat.

Last month in parliament, as MPs debated a motion to increase the number of storeys allowed, Panton said that exchanging height for far greater beach setbacks could be enough of a carrot for developers to rebuild, which would give the beach a chance to naturally replenish.

But as Cayman’s population soars and development gallops on unchecked, the beach access problem is only going to get worse. With cruise ships returning to business as usual and no indication yet that visits will be more evenly spread throughout the year, severe pressure on the beach is increasing.

On Wednesday there were four cruise ships in port carrying almost 10,000 passengers. Combined with a record number of overnight guests and residents with time off from work, pressure on the Cayman Islands’ famous stretch of beach mounts, presenting an unsustainable situation.


Share your vote!


How do you feel after reading this?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Tags: , , ,

Category: Business, Land Habitat, Science & Nature, Tourism

Comments (200)

Trackback URL | Comments RSS Feed

  1. Anonymous says:

    There needs to be a government-backed program to restore sand dunes complete with foliage along the beach. They act as a buffer for the sand. It is working in Hawaii.

  2. Anonymous says:

    I was there last week and was very surprised to see umbrellas set up there with tourists. The piece of SMB is so rocky you can hardly get in the water without falling down or bucking a toe on the rocks. It is such a disservice to tourists who spend good money to come here and be subjected to the worst beach experience. Dart also owns The Ritz so why not bus them there where the experience is much better?

    12
    3
  3. Anonymous says:

    To stop killing the source of our sands – coral and shell animals, connect ALL wastewater to Advanced Wastewater Treatment plants whose effluent removes suspended solids, has less than 5 parts per million biological oxygen demand, removes fertilizers nitrogen and phosphates and disinfects all effluent to kill ALL human pathogens.

    Do the above above Advanced Wastewater Treatment in our three Islands or continue to watch our beaches and economy disappear – sand loss is NOT caused by seawalls, yes they contribute but not the real reason – inadequately treated sewage everywhere in our three islands.

    For several decades our poor governance has known but ignored the real reason for sand loss.

    11
    20
  4. Anonymous says:

    The fact that one can travel George Town to West Bay and not see the sea is the tell-tale sign that Cayman has sold itself out to land developers and those willing to pay millions for their condos.
    Your average Caymanian has been priced out of the property market by corrupt politicians, and inadequate planning and environmental regulations.
    The interests of Caymanians should be enforced with Local Occupancy rules, affordable and subsidised allocation of condos and apartments to Caymanians within these complexes and access rights to stop this gentrification and displacement of locals.

    54
    8
  5. Owner says:

    The gross Easter camp outs show why some decent limits on access points would be a good idea.

    17
    28
    • Anonymous says:

      And whys that 5:07, so your foot on the throat of cultural tradition can suffocate it further ? How about you move to somewhere instead that satisfies your sterile preference

      10
      14
      • Anonymous says:

        “cultural tradition”, there you have it folks, everything you need to know.

        20
        8
        • Anonymous says:

          That was Mac’s lawyer’s defense in the Florida Casino when a waitress put her butt cheek in his hand , wasn’t it.?

          18
          2
      • Anonymous says:

        Cultural tradition to sleep out in a polyester tent and leave crap all over the place.

        18
        3
        • Anonymous says:

          Generational Caymanians at their finest! Back in 1984 when I first visited, the room doors were open at the Royal Palms hotel, before it burned up. We could hear the surf from the open door, never a worry about the open door, it was safe back then. Locals were digging a BBQ pit… 2″ dug per day! (Not a hurry to finish the job).

          Dive boats drove up on the beach in the AM for us to simply walk to the boat. Caymanian boat captains, Caymanian dive masters/guides. Dive sites were established by shore markers, not moored buoys.

          I cry for what Cayman has become in the last 40 years. So sad that this is largely due to local Caymanians not giving a rats a.. for their country. It all could have been prevented, controlled, directed development to benefit both locals and investment. But Caymanians ignored all logical direction for easy, small, stupid payoffs. As I said, I cry for Cayman – it is far too far gone. You have sold your country for a pittance.

          25
        • Anonymous says:

          This is ugly thinking and ugly speech.

          2
          14
    • Anonymous says:

      They finna drag you, but you’re spsot on. Most beaches and all roadsides look like they were carpet bombed with rubbish during and after easter and every holiday

      45
    • Anonymous says:

      So sorry you chose to own a luxury home beside a public beach access. Can I offer you an egg in these trying times?

      5
      1
  6. Just me says:

    Cayman has a huge problem with its 7mile (Maybe 3mile) beach that’s most places in the world does not. Too many beach (anything really) experts with no understanding of what they are talking about. Too bad they don’t trust anyone but themselves as they could look and learn from any of the many places that have solved the same problem and moved on.

    11
    22
  7. Jack say you can’t bathe on his beach the government say you need to listen to Jack! says:

    Ministers in this pact government that are owned DART is huge one house was even built back by Dart after a unfortunate accident. Too many Jacks here now and when Jack say you can’t bathe on his beach police & security guard with lock you up and run you off JACK Beach !

    8
    6
  8. Anonymous says:

    Do you know what, I really couldn’t give a flying thing about SMB anymore, it’s beyond repair and a waste of time getting one’s panties in a twist waiting for a resolution that was required more than a decade ago. What I will stand and protest energetically about is using the people’s money to replenish it for the d***heads that arrogantly decided to develop despite DOE recommendations not to. It’s not a beach for Caymanians anymore anyway, it’s time for the haughty property owners to figure it out themselves. Channel the money elsewhere for the youth or something where the next generation can prosper.

    151
    4
    • Anonymous says:

      It has not completely gone, time to preserve what we have left.

      23
      32
    • Anonymous says:

      Brilliant! Cayman has two industries – financial services and tourism. Tourism is centered around Seven Mile Beach. Financial services are under attack from Europe and the United States. What is your plan for the future – go back to making thatch rope? Or do you have so much money that you don’t have to worry about silly economic problems for regular people like paying school fees or a mortgage?

      24
      35
      • Anonymous says:

        So what are you suggesting, we need the tourism industry to prop up the Financial Services so they can pay their mortgages and school fees if that collapses ? I’ve got another idea use part of the $21M estimated to replenish the beach to help those diversify into something else until such a time corrected easements are adhered to, – and anyway you missed the point. If the owners of said problems with diminished beach choose not to replenish it why should the onus be of the rest population to step up and fork over cash when the d***heads choose to ignore DOE guidelines in the first place. It’s kind of like saying the PTA have chosen to commit arson at the children’s school, build us another one.

        32
        3
      • Anonymous says:

        And your solution/recommendations are what??? You stated the obvious, what suggestions do you have? Anything? None? Still waiting.

        2
        1
        • Anonymous says:

          To 07/01/2023 at 9:43pm

          I don’t know what response that other writer has but mine is:

          All the developers who got so greedy and did additional buildings on the beach, remove those buildings, pools and patios and let nature replenish the beach and suck up their losses while they wait.

          32
          2
      • Truth says:

        Pearls before swine. They will have to learn the hard way. All money on Cayman comes from off island (expats) but the only way they will see that is to have it taken away. Way too late to take it back as very little of the land, homes, businesses are owned by Caymanians anymore.

        23
        3
    • Anonymous says:

      That’s how I feel too. I miss quiet evenings on the beach after work and relaxing there with the family at weekends but we can never find anywhere in the shade to go any more and it’s getting so hard to find quiet spots to set up umbrella and chairs, way too expensive to hire and don’t like being tightly squeezed into regimented rows anyway. With the over-development, herds of loud, littering cruise ship tourists, beach erosion, the loss of Royal Palms, Calico Jack’s, etc. the annoying beach vendors and the mess that Dart made, SMB lost its appeal years ago. For me, it all started with the building of the Kimpton and the loss of West Bay Road. I’m not blaming everything on that just saying that’s the point where from my perspective everything spiralled downwards. I’m not going to use my GB passport but I am actively looking elsewhere in the Caribbean where I can afford a home and get back to real island life.

      42
      3
      • Anonymous says:

        ‘For me, it all started with the building of the Kimpton and the loss of West Bay Road.’

        Or when Dartussia annexed half of Georgetown North with his Sea To Sound Skyway, – there’s no way one immigrant with no previous heritage here should ever have been allowed to mold a country and landscape in pursuit of his own personal vision, – ‘keep you eye on that eight ball’ Ken

        20
        2
      • Anonymous says:

        So for you, it all started with the sustainable approach of setting back a hotel property from the sea.

        But you would have preferred it be built closer to the sea so you could continue to drive on a piece of colas.

        Understood.

        4
        14
  9. Anonymous says:

    Sell it to Dart

    6
    22
    • Anonymous says:

      Most of it has been anyway. Just give him the rest and be done with it.

      18
      5
      • Anonymous says:

        Deport the idiots who allowed him to buy the Cayman Islands!

        19
        4
        • watcher says:

          There is only one ‘idiot’ involved, and he is entrenched in his West Bay fortress.

          22
          2
        • Anonymous says:

          You will have no past or present Ministers left! And they were the best and brightest Cayman could offer. Very sad.

          7
          2
          • Anonymous says:

            Ministers of any kind are rarely the best or brightest a nation has to offer, regardless of where you are in the world. If only your disdain for Cayman and its people was strong enough to get you back on a flight back to wherever you previously failed to find happiness. My suggestion is to work on becoming a better person. Get some help if you need it.

            4
            4
        • Anonymous says:

          So I guess you want to start with the Kirkconnell family that sold Royal Palms to Dart?

          29
        • Anonymous says:

          Hate to break it to you but it’s your own people.

  10. Nautical-one345 says:

    This scenario (the Marriott’s loss of beach) does NOT warrant funds from the public purse to literally dump sand in the sea where their beach used to be. Any sand dumped there will be washed out to sea as soon as the first Nor-Wester arrives.
    The original developers of that property (and some others) were warned that they were building too close to the sea. They said they knew better and ignored the warnings.

    123
    2
    • YES says:

      Marriott remove the structures that are on the beach which are impeding the natural flow of the sea and sand and your problem solved. You know the structures you were told not to erect dem same ones. Move them!!’

      90
      3
    • Anonymous says:

      This in itself should form a petition by the people. Not even one cent from public purse should be wasted on this.

      40
  11. Frank says:

    LOL, climate change, quit falling for that BS.

    I’ve said this numerous times, nothing is going to change the Building Plans 5 years from now, 10 years from now and so on. Yes you might throw a rock in the rock and slow them down but none the less it will get done.

    Stop worrying about the change and make the change correct, not my island, but love visiting it.

    You need to make sure that any new building PROTECTS the beach, easements and protective plant life. This is something you can make a difference in, but you have to get your eyes off the shiny thing and see the big picture. You WON’T stop the progress, but could do this the right way, it’s you’re island and in masses you can make a difference. But you won’t stop the SoBeach building that’s coming.

    Developers are in it for one reason, make no mistake about that, and you don’t have the money to stop them. Only make it right.

    15
    48
    • Anonymous says:

      climate change denial is so qanon stupid

      51
      10
    • Anonymous says:

      Frank, the climate change reality denier. Let’s hope you are not an educator, and just an old cruddy boomer with an internet connection.

      Obviously, you can use the internet, so do a search on Key West and how the sea is reclaiming the city. That’s climate change and coastal cities will follow their fate in the coming years no matter how hard you deny it.

      53
      7
      • Anonymous says:

        Yo watch it boy. Some of us boomers have been a active on climate from before your momma wore diapers.

        13
        16
        • Anonymous says:

          And how has your efforts paid off ‘a active’ genius?

          11
          3
          • Anonymous says:

            That was a typo,keyboard and autotext on phone always glitchy on CNS for some reason, and I’m doing just fine thanks. Been raising funds, spreading awareness, working pro bono and marching in London for three decades. Back then activist was a bad word and we were mostly scorned. Things are thankfully different today. I am also active in the community helping kids with reading, spelling, understanding nature and the environment. I took in children for several years while their mother recovered from drink and drug problems. I like to think those efforts paid off in some tiny way. Why, what have you done?

            5
            10
      • Sickofparrots says:

        Question why the sea is reclaiming Key West. Is the sea level rising only there and not here, or is erosion caused by overbuilding and removal of native fauna to blame?

        Fifteen minutes of valid scientific research will answer your question, if you can suspend your confirmation bias.

        You seem to love to marginalise people with labels. What label do you suppose would fit you? Think about it. Think for yourself and do some serious research. You don’t have to tell us about it. Do it for yourself.

        CNS: I’m not entirely sure what point you’re making but it seems as though you are denying the fact of sea level rise and/or climate change. Apologies if I am wrong. The greatest immediate factor by far in the disappearing beaches is developing too close to the sea, which is having an impact that is clearly observable. The DoE has been saying this for decades. However, sea level rise over the long term has to be taken into account for long-term planning. For those just wanting to get rich and to hell with our children and grandchildren, this may not be of interest.

        See: Do scientists agree on climate change? (Spoiler alert: Yes, they do.)

        NASA: Are sea levels rising the same all over the world, as if we’re filling a giant bathtub?
        No. Sea level rise is uneven, the two main reasons being ocean dynamics and Earth’s uneven gravity field. Link here.

        NOAA: 2022 Sea Level Rise Technical Report

        5
        16
  12. Anonymous says:

    seems like a decent plan for the time being. well done again to the private sector.

    2
    19
  13. Anonymous says:

    Whatever happened to the “Boggy Sand” issue??? Maybe the Premier can start there with his sustainability.

    54
    1
  14. Al Catraz says:

    The “Grand Cayman Marriott Beach Resort” is “transparent” about the lack of beach? What a joke. Imagine if Cayman had laws concerning false advertising. It would be most fascinating to learn why the beachless “Grand Cayman Marriott Beach Resort” is not a textbook example of false advertising.

    89
    • Anonymous says:

      Our not so honorable minister of tourism, should climb down from his illegal billboard to address this situation.
      Cayman’s tourism product and reputation need protection, A good time for the dept of Tourism to get involved.?

      55
  15. Anonymous says:

    LOL! Zero sympathy for all the moaners. You reap what you sow and greedy ‘generational’ Caymanians sold their ‘birthright’ for a Ford F150. Now they want their beach back. Too late I’m afraid. CayMiami in 5 years. Probably less.

    105
    9
  16. Anonymous says:

    Well if it’s leased I hope the Marriott paid their stamp duty or did they get a concession?

    52
    2
    • Anonymous says:

      Lease what exactly? The beach is public land.

      6
      4
      • Anonymous says:

        only to 6 foot from the high watermark. Another planning failure that needs to be changed to at least 6 feet behind the vegetation line so the entire beach and under the few almond and coconut trees we have left should be declared public.

        28
        1
      • Anonymous says:

        Not to the mean high water mark!

        5
        2
  17. Anonymous says:

    Immediately Remove the groin in front of treasure island resort. This is likely a significant contributor to the erosion problem! Then re-evaluate after a season or two. This groin is on crown land so government can just remove it. It won’t cost much and won’t be wasted – like dumping sand that washes away. It is undoubtedly affecting currents. I don’t know if it has caused the erosion but it has likely contributed.

    58
    3
    • Anonymous says:

      Absolute rubbish. It was there before the drastic erosion. Keep looking for excuses for building hard structures – the rocks at TI allow wave action to flow through.

      8
      48
      • Anonymous says:

        Nonsense.

        The big ugly pile of rocks allows a limited amount of sand to pass through, not even close to all that would naturally.

        Hence the gradual erosion which eventually compounded in to the issue which we face today.

        44
        2
        • Anonymous says:

          Oh Gee, let’s pick an element that has been there for years, and is WAY south of the issues and remarkably without evidence just blame it. Pure Cayman uneducation to deny the root cause of the erosion = climate change with increased wave action and decades of building too close to the beach. STOP blaming everyone else for your incompetence! So stupid.

          8
          13
          • Anonymous says:

            Good luck with reason, logic and common knowledge (for those that care to get educated/informed) on this thread. The rallying cry to blame ‘someone’ as opposed to looking at the well-established problems of HARD structures that block natural wave action (not the porous TI groins that have been there for decades) is a sad reflection of faulty logic (I’m being very, very polite). But, can’t fix stu..d.

            4
            4
          • Anonymous says:

            It’s still causing problems even if not responsible for this one. There’s another groin south end of beach. Any and all need to go.

            15
            1
      • Anonymous says:

        Not really 9:14, I recall the first part of the erosion although very subtle occurring in front of the wall at Treasure Island on the north side when you could walk through to Plantation Village and SMB. It diminished more and more and then just extended further north. The next big problem was the house North of Laguna del Mar

        47
        1
        • Anonymous says:

          You nailed the real problem – the house North of Laguna del Mar. The TI rocks are a sad distraction from the real issues which everyone knows but don’t have the will to address.

          37
          • Anonymous says:

            Yes, yes, yes. There are obvious folks that have a nit to pick with the TI groins, but they/him/her simply do not comprehend that the problems are further North. Hey – why not blame East End for West Bay problems? STOP seeking a false cause for the beach erosion at the Marriott! It is their own fault for how they expanded towards the sea. They were warned, now they can see the results of THEIR actions. It is not the fault of TI far to the south. Hmnnn, maybe the TI groin complainers are Marriott supporters who can’t admit to their epic folly!!!!! Karma sucks 20-30 years later for Marriott investors. Fix it yourself!

            5
            3
            • Anonymous says:

              Oh, logic will not sit well with this audience of 3-4-5 who submit repeated posts. This is a sad joke that all can read and see.

              2
              1
    • Anonymous says:

      remove the royal walter terminal – that’s when the erosion increased substantially.

      2
      1
  18. Anonymous says:

    So did the Marriott obtained planning approval? Did planning sent out notices to adjoining land owners? Asking for a friend.

    38
    6
    • Anonymous says:

      Marriott took over the property, they were not the original developers.
      I remember Ezzard Miller going to the site when it was under construction to complain that the seaside setback was not met.
      He was overruled.
      I miss Ezzard Miller. He lacked a politician’s bedside manner, but he was straight and unafraid. Wish he was still around to deal with some of our MP rabble.

      28
      4
  19. Anonymous says:

    Why not just take them to Kenny Beach in town? I mean we all paid one hell of a lot for it and not like anybody using it.

    73
  20. Rick says:

    Beach erosion is the result of rising sea levels??? Garbage…

    21
    40
  21. Anonymous says:

    Too many cruise ship passengers putting too much pressure on our roads and beaches. Combine that with tourists and residents fight for scraps of nice beaches on their days off. Soon come a day when one must pay for the privilege to use the nice beaches.

    63
    1
  22. Anonymous says:

    It is not that hard. Beach replenishment is needed and has been used in the last 15 years very successfully in tourist areas in the US for example from Florida to Main. The government and DOE does not have to reinvent the wheel and there are many case studies out there researching the results of the replenishment.

    11
    87
    • Orlando Bob says:

      On Manasota Key Beach on the west coast of Florida, south of Sarasota, they spent $30 million replenishing a beach for the rich people and their houses on the beach. After the last hurricane $30 million of sand is now out in the depths of the Gulf of Mexico again.

      You need to learn the lessons of Florida 5:18 because obviously you don’t know what is going on.

      122
      1
    • Anonymous says:

      The Gulf of Mexico beaches and the seabed is much different than ours. Sand replenishment works there beacuse the ocean topogrophy is favorable for it.

      Here, not so much.

      41
      6
      • Orlando Bob says:

        8:32, You obviously can’t read. The sand replenishment did not work on the west coast of Florida.

        15
        13
      • Anonymous says:

        I guess the hurricanes that hit Florida are different than the ones that hit here. Wake up Bobo, and read more about beach erosion in Florida and the Caribbean.

        Sand replenishment does not work in Florida, Cayman, New Jersey or anywhere else on the ocean due to rising seas and bigger storms.

        41
        2
    • Anonymous says:

      Read Baird’s EIA report and you will learn about where the sand goes given the unique bathymetry of Seven Mile Beach. Sure, it’s all still there, except it’s now dispersed on a plateau at 1000 feet below west wall off GT. We might as well pile the $20mln onto wooden pallets and set it on fire, at least then it will have served a fleeting purpose for the tourists. Remind us again on why the Cayman public needs to pay for Marriott’s repugnant construction errors? They were told not to build the wall and did it anyway. @$#4 ’em.

      47
  23. Anonymous says:

    Demolish all buildings on the beach side and re-build it across the WB road…wait, they will be closer to the Dump…a bummer…
    Sorry, Grand Cayman is doomed…

    78
    5
  24. Anonymous says:

    Here’s an idea how about Marriott just give to the reality that they have no beach, their hotel lobby is 4 stars lobby but rooms are 3 stars hotel, market themselves has a no beach property and let the free market drop their laughable high room prices down from $500+ a night to a reasonable rate of $100 to reflect the value they offer. Continuing on that view drop their drink prices at their nice lobby bar. Roll with the situation Marriott.

    117
    • Anonymous says:

      The room I stayed in over the Christmas holiday at the Marriott cost $700/night. No beach. THAT IS A JOKE! Lower the price to fit the situation. Hampton, Sunshine Suites, Locale along with Holiday Inn should not be priced over $150/night as none of those hotels have any beach.

      108
      2
      • Anonymous says:

        You paid… as did everyone else so they can charge that. Until speak by not coming, the rate they charge is correct. That is a fact

        81
        1
      • Miami Dave says:

        5:14, You obviously did not do your due diligence as a tourist. THAT IS A JOKE. Have no pity for you.

        35
        1
        • Anonymous says:

          We stayed on airline vouchers. We never would pay to stay there. There is no beach!

          22
          7
          • Hubert says:

            People with airline vouchers should read Trip Adviser before they come here.

            Do a bit of due diligence.

            10
  25. Anonymous says:

    Island of concrete

    79
    3
  26. Anonymous says:

    This is a problem of the Marriott’s own making. Tear down those walls!

    93
    • Anonymous says:

      I disagree, there used to be so much at the Marriott that the sea never reached the wall. My view is that the Treasure Island retaining rocks were the catalyst for the Marriotts disappearing beach and the rest of the idiots wanting beachfront residence that followed

      16
      5
  27. Anonymous says:

    When it opened in the 1990s (as Radisson Beach Resort), it had a huge and deep beach. Hard to believe it looked like this in the 1990s:

    http://www.citycliks.com/graphics/24_06.jpg

    82
    • Anonymous says:

      wow

      49
      2
    • Anonymous says:

      There were thatch-roofed beach cabanas south of the hotel on a wide beachfront that stretched south to Treasure Island. Then again, in the 1700’s most of what is now Seven Mile Beach were beach-less mangroves covered with basking crocodiles and Caribbean monk seals. If you dig a hole, you will hit dark patches of mangrove wood. Nothing is static in this world.

      30
    • Anonymous says:

      Proof that the wall had nothing to do with the issue at hand.

      7
      26
    • Anonymous says:

      I disagree, there used to be so much at the Marriott that the sea never reached the wall. My view is that the Treasure Island retaining rocks were the catalyst for the Marriotts disappearing beach and the rest of the idiots wanting beachfront residence that followed

      12
      2
      • Anonymous says:

        Sheesh, same old nonsense. You really need to get off the couch and get educated on the history and science of how sand flows. The issues are on hard structures North of TI. Hard walls where the .. oh never mind – can’t fix stupid. Enjoy your cheetos.

        3
        1
        • Anonymous says:

          Sand doesn’t flow, it’s ‘transported’ stupid. Did you know that the rocks at Treasure Island are not the original rocks or in the formation that were originally there ?

          Whilst munching on my cheetahs ignoramous I decided to look at recent and early 90’s satellite pictures of SMB, I invite you to do the same and see if you think it’s plausible that a sand collection just south of TI at the edge of the wall that would follow the hydrodynamic flow around the rock formation during NWesters doesn’t appear to be there in the earlier photos. I’ll concede the photo quality could be better but I’m firm with the concept that the Marriot wasn’t the problem initiating the disappearing sand. At the time it had as much beach if not more than the Westin.

          4
          1
    • Anonymous says:

      Two volleyball courts side by side and still more than plenty of room to walk by if I remember

      24
  28. Anonymous says:

    Just change the name to “Marriott Oceanfront Resort”, and take down any beach pictures from your website.

    Every review complains about the lack of beach at a “beachfront” resort. It is not coming back.

    74
  29. C'Mon Now! says:

    People do not have unfettered access to private property.

    The law as written allows access to the mean high water mark…

    …that means anyone sitting on sand that doesn’t get wet is on private property if it isn’t crown land.

    13
    57
    • Anonymous says:

      BTW It’s the vegetation line.

      20
      10
      • Anonymous says:

        What vegetation?

        10
        1
      • Anonymous says:

        no it’s not it is the high water mark

        25
        6
        • Anonymous says:

          No it is not. The public has unfettered and inalienable right to peaceably use and enjoy the beach from vegetation line to sea – even though legal title to that land may be in private hands. If a developer is ignorant or stupid enough to move the vegetation line back further from the sea, then they must live with the consequences.

          The right to peaceable use and enjoyment exists whether or not there is a hotel or condo or bar or restaurant or DART’s house or the Governor’s house on that land. Mutual respect is inherent in the way the rights operate, but they are real, lawful, long-standing, and should not be surrendered by the Caymanian people.

          37
          3
      • Anonymous says:

        It’s 6 foot above the high watermark. I wish it was 6 foot behind vegetation. That’s why you have people like the big new house by the launch ramp in FS building walls and now borders almost up to the waterline. When the spring tides come, they’re underwater, blocking access to the beach. Same with the house next door to it. It’s been going on for years sll over the island and nobody seems to give a rats ass.

        16
    • Anonymous says:

      The beach is public access property below what is a mean annual spring high tide line, which is a very different point than where a wave might finish on a Sunday. The buildings and private furnishings that are occupying beach in that full tidal zone should be removed without any debate, and there should be an observed storm buffer setback as good practice.

      60
      1
      • Anonymous says:

        Sounds like the DOE or similar agency should post permanent markers on all beaches to remind oceanfront property owners and users where exactly the high water marks are. Bet alot of “private property” signs come down on 7MB

        28
        1
    • Miami Dave says:

      Perhaps the Marriott Beach Resort should just drop the “Beach” in its title.

      It is a real misnomer and people will get pissed off for certain when they discover there is no beach there.

      When I pay for a beach resort I expect a beach. Doesn’t everybody?

      63
    • Anonymous says:

      Why you in on this?
      If there’s no beach who cares!
      It becomes The Queen’s Bottom.

      6
      5
  30. Anonymous says:

    Lets all give thanks to Mr. Dart for his help to make Cayman a great place.

    9
    72
  31. JTB says:

    What a comfort it is to know that we have the pure and incorruptible CPA to protect our interests and environment.

    44
    1
    • Anonymous says:

      DART does not need Planning permission to rent some of its land to the Marriott. The CPA has nothing to do with this.

      17
      9
  32. Anonymous says:

    Dart does not “own” ANY stretch of beach. Period.

    45
    6
    • Anonymous says:

      Not the narrow beach, but does own the land in front of the beach. That is what is being rented. Marriott has to use the land in front of the beach to make this work.

      20
      7
      • Jimmy C says:

        Land in front of the beach?!….swords will be drawn to prove that leaves are not green in summer.

        21
      • Anonymous says:

        The upland behind the beach was part of the Soto Land amalgamation from the NRA Agreement. Since DART did not fully satisfy its part of the NRA Agreements, CIG should frankly review whether this land should continue to bear their logo, or whether it should be forfeited back to the crown.

        14
        3
      • Anonymous says:

        Err, have you actually SEEN the chairs? They’re almost in the water.

        13
        2
  33. Anonymous says:

    A private landowner permits the use of their land within the confines of the law? Say it ain’t so! Quick, call the PoPo!

    19
    17
  34. Anonymous says:

    We are pumping our Sewage into the ground which leaches into the Ocean killing the reefs that supply the sand that replenishes our beaches! Nothing to do with climate change! Or Sea Level Rise!
    Our deep wells are only 300 ft! The keys are at over 3,000 ft deep and only pumping the salt water they can’t use to recycle and pump back to the Ocean safely! Be informed. Do your own research our water quality is way worse than Florida but no one is explaining that to us!

    https://fla-keys.com/news/article/734/

    The Reefs are Dying/Bleaching! Go for a dive, you can see it! I used to go diving off SS and remember the Coral Elk-horns so big and healthy. They now look like broken bones piled on top of each other! Ask your elected official for our water quality tests compared to Key West! Pumping Sand is only a quick fix and will be gone after the next Storm!

    60
    10
    • Anonymous says:

      Who is actually disagreeing with this though? If you do, please make yourself known and explain on here. I am not the OP, but it’s clear as day what we’re doing to this island. The dump has been on fire for now four – six months, a deep set fire that we’ve been pumping water into every day for the entire time. Guess where that water goes? Through the depths of our most toxic waste and out into the North Sound. Yet no one is talking about it, we are killing ourselves, our children and our island and yet we sit idly.

      53
      7
      • Anonymous says:

        A friend of mine has left the island, after living in Cayman for 15 years. she was smart enough to sell her beach front condo (nearly across the Dump) before the beach started to disappear. She owns 2 more condos which she is renting out.

        27
        7
    • Anonymous says:

      Paint, solvents and other chemicals being poured down our drains hourly. Unlined landfill and water treatment ponds. Not to mention tons of heavy metals now routinely scattered from grotesque unregulated fireworks shows. Sunscreen. There are lots of suspects, and no corrective action on any front.

      22
  35. Anonymous says:

    Do not worry as Honorable Bryant will get it resolved!

    33
    6
    • Anonymous says:

      Oh yea Mr.Useless that continues to get accolades by doing nothing. He is part of the problem.

      21
    • Anonymous says:

      Yea right after he sorts out the Miss Cayman & Port Authority messes. That is one busy guy!

      • Anonymous says:

        Port Authority…OMG.
        Did you hear CMR’s radio show , pulled no punches shaming and naming . It seems that only political protection is keeping one particular board member safe despite serious allegations.

  36. Anonymous says:

    Again, kick the Governor off the beach and have that property adjoining the current ‘gov beach’ extended and given to the people….do not allow concessions on it

    Why are we continually catering to the developers/realtors/cruise passengers against our own interests?

    Utter madness. Total and utter self-abusing madness hurting Caymanians overseen by Caymanians

    What SMB beach will our future generations have? Why must we house a governor there? FFS

    11
    106
    • Anonymous says:

      Please change the record FFS. Fine get rid of the governors house, what are we gaining? Maybe 60 – 100 metres stretch? For what gain? It’s not like we can’t access the beach there anyway.

      I don’t think your ignorance allows you to see that tourists like Governors beach, and find it quaint – it’s an appealing location.

      82
      1
      • Anonymous says:

        Heck locals like it too. Its one of the few unspoilt places left on SMB that we can go now Dart bought all the rest from Royal Palms to Calico’s and Kimpton.

        22
        1
    • Anonymous says:

      Having the governor in that location is the best option for Caymanians so we can go to the beach in front of it. The house has a big beach in front of it and the governor has NEVER kicked anyone off it. If it turned into shops or restaurants or anything else, there would be tables, loungers, scam artists and hustlers scattered all over the place.

      Plus look at the disgrace that Smiths Cove has turned into, with cars being able to drive onto the beach and people hooking up generators to blast awful music from their cars at all hours of the day.

      113
      • Anonymous says:

        Actually it was fine when it was Smith Cove. As soon as people suddenly “remembered” that it was Smith Barcadere it became the disgrace you describe

        29
        3
      • Anonymous says:

        The government placed huge rocks to stop cars and trucks from driving on the beach, but the locals found a workaround and continue to park on the sands and not one single agency stops them. The no loud music sign in the parking lot across the road was destroyed and never replaced, so the lawlessness continues unabated by any agency.

        At Public Beach, local boaters anchor up in the waters used by swimmers of all ages, and further down near Governor’s Beach, the giant Red Sails catamaran forces swimmers out of the way to pick up and drop off guests right on the sands.

        I would dare say the Marriott Beach is likely a nicer place, with no lawlessness and selfishness.

        25
        1
    • Anonymous says:

      But “The People” as you put it, already have & use Governor’s beach and adjoining beachfront of the Governors house.
      Perhaps you should actually go down and visit the beach & see both tourists and residents enjoying it.

      36
  37. Anonymous says:

    A great initiative. Well done to all involved. The beach looks amazing, much nicer than when the nasty freeloaders are left to their own devices and leave all their shit behind.

    33
    23
  38. Anonymous says:

    Marriott guests going to Dart property??

    Sounds like Dart buying Marriott now too, dirt/sand cheap!

    26
    4
    • Anonymous says:

      Sounds like you need professional help.

      5
      22
    • Hubert says:

      Only a matter of time till Dart buys the Marriott.

      30
      • Anonymous says:

        No beach so not interested.

        2
        4
        • Miami Dave says:

          1:28, Yes, but Dart can buy it and build a 20 storey Marriott way back from the waterfront. If there are no concrete obstructions the beach will come back. The Marriott is very old and inefficient now as a hotel.

        • Anonymous says:

          Yeah but when he wants to build one CIG will as usual just roll over and be a good dog, no matter what we think.

    • They paved Paradise.... says:

      The Marriott does not deserve our sympathy. They destroyed their own beach and others when they built the hotel too close to the waters edge despite objections.

      20
  39. Ezra says:

    I wouldn’t hold my breath waiting for the do-nothing pact to make any difference.

    29
    7

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.