Alarming number of speeders on local roads

| 15/08/2022 | 178 Comments

(CNS): As Cayman marks the grim milestone of a dozen road deaths this year, the police are appealing to drivers to slow down and stop drinking. The RCIPS is urging motorists to engage in safe driving over weekends and in bad weather, as the number of fatal collisions this year climbs. Aleiny Reve Villegas (20) was the latest person to die in the eleventh fatal collision of 2022. Her death follows that of Margaret Rose Garcia (77), who was killed on the way home from her daughter’s wedding on 31 July.

“Unfortunately, some members of the public are seemingly taking a callous attitude toward dangerous driving behaviours, particularly speeding,” said Acting Superintendent Brad Ebanks. “We are seeing an alarming number of persons driving at excessive speeds, and the consequences of that decision. Speeding greatly increases your chances of being involved in a collision and makes it far more likely that the consequences of a collision will be serious, or even deadly. The outcome is even more likely when you add alcohol into the mix.”

The penalty for speeding is a fine of $20 for every mile per hour over the speed limit a driver is travelling. If the total fine exceeds $500 dollars, drivers will have to attend court and if convicted, they are liable to have their licence suspended for a minimum of twelve months in addition to the fine.

The current legal blood-alcohol limit in the Cayman Islands is 0.100%. Those tested and found to have a blood-alcohol content at or exceeding this amount will be subject to arrest. Upon conviction, they can expect a fine of up to $1,000 and the loss of their driver’s licence for a minimum of twelve months. The penalties increase for those with previous DUI convictions.

“Our officers are out on patrol and will continue to target and prosecute persons who engage in unsafe driving behaviours,” warned Inspector Andre Tahal of the Traffic and Roads Policing Unit. “The best choice of action is to slow down, drive safely and avoid becoming involved in a collision or being prosecuted for an offence. And if you are going to drink, ensure you arrange an alternate way to get home safely. Never drink and drive. Let’s work together to make our roads safe,” he added.


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Category: Crime, Police

Comments (178)

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  1. Anonymous says:

    I was driving on Crewe Road tonight, on my way home for a food run and the car behind me had 1 headlight on. A police car passed me heading into town and there was enough space between my car and the one behind me for them to see this but surprise surprise, they didn’t turn around to stop and ticket them. I’ve had a speeder, over take me and the cop car in front of me and speed away with not even as tick from the cop car in front of me. Everyone sees this I’m sure on a daily basis. I’m sorry, traffic cops are inept and are a disgrace.

  2. Anonymous says:

    On my way to work last week at the stop light by the cricket field, a driver heading in to town on Bobby Thompson Way pulled into the turn right lane from about where the UCCI turn is, drove to the intersection like he was going to turn right and then cut me off as he pulled back into the intersection to go straight. I stopped inches from his car with my hand on the horn the entire time he was infront of me and he gave me the finger like I was the one who did something wrong. Once I saw the yellow, green and black flag hanging by the rear view mirror I realized he didn’t know any better because he was most likely dragged up and got his liscense out of a cereal box. Also considering our signs are posted in MPH, why are cars being allowed in that only have KPH speedometers. Why does the dept of motor vehicles not withhold cars road worthiness for this… oh yeah.. revenue sorry silly me.

  3. Anonymous says:

    And if no one else has mentioned, along with the overwhelming amount of dangerous speeders(all day/night) and DUI drivers, we also have the the nasty new trend of excessive and AGGRESSIVE BUMPER-RIDING or TAILGATING the Police needs to START again to enforce the EXISTING Law on Bumper-Riding. In addition we have a very dangerous trend of MANY driving at night with NO LIGHTS front or rear or one headlight(obvious they are DISCONNECTED) as a trend. Last but not least, is a a growing number of absent minded and careless drivers not using TURN SIGNALS. Finally the extremely LOUD EXHAUST SYSTEMS that there is also an EXISTING LAW prohibiting NOISE POLLUTION Cayman’s roads have become VERY HOSTILE to drive and desperately needs to be restored to some level of normalcy.

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    • Anonymous says:

      I am sick of being woken up by those noisy marl trucks racing up and down from 4 am each morning. You can hear them coming from miles away. Add to that the fog/smoke some of them produce, it’s beyond high time something was done about it.

      • Anonymous says:

        Mangrove Ave and Mahoga like a marl truck speedways today. Racing up and down, banging over speedbumps constantly since first light. Engine noise incredibly loud, way beyond acceptable levels. Almost impossible to work or hear anyone on Skype calls. They’re real noise and general pollution producers and need to be regulated.

  4. Anonymous says:

    Yes, continue with the speed checks in South Sound, but more importantly station speed checks 24/7 on LPH, the stretch opposite hurleys and the stretch at spotts straight.
    It’s absolutely shear madness the way people drive, no matter what time you’re in those areas.
    It’s not rocket science RCIP, post your patrols there, ticket the speeders and remove the drivers from the cars without insurance/license and have the car towed! Simple as that, do this every day and send the message to these lawless drivers that we will no longer tolerate their reckless behavior.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Sounds good to me….. Am I the only person that thinks the police should
      do more to get drunks, etc. off the streets?
      I say, fellows……. WHY NOT?

    • Anonymous says:

      Even better would be average speed devices. One on Spotts Straight. One at Hurley’s Roundabout. One in South Sound. One on LPH. One on Walkers Road. Automated with effective ticketing and penalties. Free up police resources.

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  5. Anonymous says:

    My thoughts. I just walked through GT. Around 50% or more drivers and passengers don’t wear seatbelts. It’s easy to see, easy to ticket. But, because this isn’t enforced despite it being so blatant, it encourages every other rule to be ignored.

    Seatbelts have been proven to have saved millions of lives, yet we cannot persuade idiots here to wear them, despite the great risk of an accident. I bet nearly every fatality or serious injury on the road here, aside from the major head-on collisions, involves someone not wearing a seatbelt.

    Don’t even start me on the pricks with kids clambering around their speeding metal boxes. If we don’t teach road safety, can we at least teach physics.

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  6. Anonymous says:

    Fire all the English and Jamaican cops and get some American cops in here so the job is done right!

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    • Anonymous says:

      You do realize that the UK police are probably the best trained out of all right?

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      • Anonymous says:

        They are less adept at firearm-involved crimes, because they weren’t indoctrinated with the mindset necessary to carry firearms safely, nor the situations in which violence is a possibility, but still should not involve the use of firearms.

        Agree. Give us U.S. LEOs.

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        • Anonymous says:

          What utter drivel. You see armed police in London all the time. They are FAR better trained than regular US cops and, amazingly, kill almost no one. Imagine that! LEO LOL.

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        • Anonymous says:

          Clueless. Yeah sure let’s get the most violent and racist police force in the civilised world to stop a few idiots breaking the speed limit. Brilliant idea. I guess when they shoot a few of them we’ll have fewer people speeding.

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      • Forman says:

        Training is nothing without actual use. Nice try.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Good luck black people lol

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    • Anonymous says:

      Seeing an American cop without a gun would be like seeing a tennis player without a racquet.

      CNS: U.S. police kill civilians at much higher rates than other countries

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      • Anonymous says:

        Thank you CNS. American police and their gun culture has been the laughing stock of the world for decades. From a Brit. Also remember cayman is a British territory. Now little Americans… please learn to drive.

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      • Anonymous says:

        More of us are armed, so….

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    • Anonymous says:

      In the long history of stupid posts on CNS that has to be right up there.

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      • Anon says:

        But not surprising. These people are guessing tourism product. Just look stupid average ritz and kimoton tourist… we take their money but they are not people you’d ever really take seriously

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    • Anon says:

      We don’t have cops. We have police. We are civilized, we are a uk territory, this is not the uk of a (ie. we are respected unlike America). Remember the us is laughed at by the uk, Europe and most other respected nations.

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    • who cares, I do. says:

      And they start profiling every dark skinned person like they do in the USA.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Not that you are making broad, completely biased assumptions based upon your extremely limited media-driven view.

        Most U.S. LEOs are as disgusted as you and me with the very visible and racist few. When is the last time you saw a media story regarding the good works that U.S. LEOs do? Never, that’s when. Don’t judge the many by the very few. Most U.S. LEOs are good people.

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  7. Anonymous says:

    obstructing the flow of traffic. You learn not to do that when you take the test. Driving below the speed limit on a single-lane or any road because you have nowhere to be is obstructing the flow of traffic, and it encourages other drivers to overtake. Surely not a good driving practice.

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    • who cares, I do. says:

      tell that to those teaching people to drive, especially those teachers who park on pedestrian crossings and tell people,”I won’t be long,just a few minutes”. I have that told to me by that britisher.

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  8. Anonymous says:

    people are not afraid to speed, because they know the stats are on their side. They are most likely not to get caught, and if they are, will most likely get out of the ticket.

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  9. Anonymous says:

    Here is a link explaining speed camera technology in the UK.

    https://www.carbuyer.co.uk/tips-and-advice/160228/average-speed-cameras-how-do-they-work?amp

    This is the obvious solution for cayman. We are a small country and coverage would be easy, we can afford the technology, we have a small police force and this would free up personnel to do important work, and we have “smart” license plates that would assist with enforcement. It’s a no brained. I bet you could easily find a local consortium who would fund the cost of the equipment and partner with government if the government doesn’t want to make the investment. It this sounds interesting, the first thing government needs to do is to ensure they law is updated to allow these cameras to operate. spend the money. I’ve laid it out on a silver platter for a community minded politician. Let’s see if anyone cares about real change or if it is all lip service.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Speed cameras don’t work. Once you account for reversion to the mean there is no improvement in accident statistics. They are a solution pushed by businesses who profit from building installing and maintaining them. Competent and safe drivers are able to drive at an appropriate speed for the conditions which may be above or below the posted limit. Constantly banging on this speed thing is pointless when half your drivers are neither competent nor safe at any speed.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Obvious solution? Sure let’s just ignore the fact that half the drivers here have never taken a real driving test and pretend you can fix the issue with multi million pound cameras.

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    • Anonymous says:

      “It’s a no brained.” It certainly is no brained. There are 250,000 miles of roads on the UK and just 300 miles have average speed cameras. They suck. Like your idea. I’ve no doubt you could find a “local consortium” to help themselves to a few million in CIG funds for it though.

    • Forman says:

      If you like speed cams so much like coffee then quit your lavish job here and go back there to YOUR home.

      Simple? And with No disrespect…

      Tell me, why do we have to adjust for you ‘foreign emperors’?

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    • Anonymous says:

      Nah…… it just lip service.

  10. Anonymous says:

    The roads would empty almost immediately if we imposed a minimum gas price of $20 or even $30 per gallon.

    You’d end up with car sharing, ride sharing, slower driving by most (uses less gas), less driving (can’t afford to) and safer roads.

    More use if taxi’s at night as cheaper. More use of buses

    It would happen overnight. Nothing else will change our problem, you have to remove the ease of driving and not simply improve public transport or add more police, etc.

    Draconian yes, and will really target the less wealthy obviously but that’s life. It will work. Make it $50 a gallon. All of a sudden you’ll have 5 people sharing rides and gas and nobody speeding or being overly reckless and emptier roads, much safer.

    It will work.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Yeah let’s make life more inconvenient and expensive for no reason because we have a few too many car accidents.

      You’ll find plenty of backers for that one.

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    • Anonymous says:

      All right now, Joe, time for you to go gum your breakfast in Vermont, and stop bothering these nice people.

      Maybe your next brainstorm will involve increasing the cost of cancer medication, or better yet, cut to the chase and just create legislation that makes cancer illegal. That’s the ticket!

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    • Anonymous says:

      Nothing else? Not even real driving tests like the rest of the world? Cayman is not exceptional. Our driving standards are so poor because we give licenses to people who wouldn’t get them elsewhere.

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  11. Anonymous says:

    Speed cameras and fines will stop this nonsense in no time and generate cash for government coffers to improve road quality.

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  12. Anonymous says:

    Had a lady reversing down Bobby Thompson this morning because she’d missed her turning … needless to say looked Jamaican.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Had some just stop their car in the middle of the road to chat up some lady walking. When we blew our horn at them to at least move to the side of the road they started yelling about our race/skin color. What is wrong with these people that they do not follow any road code at all but seems like it is the rule of the jungle?

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    • David Duke says:

      “needless to say looked Jamaican”…lol; can you imagine the uproar if someone in the UK or US said something like that.

      Needless to say … because anyone committing a traffic offence must be Jamaican.

      Looked – because you can tell someone’s nationality just by looking at them.

      To the poster – there is a nice simple test to see if you are bigoted. Just replace the name of the group/nationality you have just referred to with “black”, Jewish”, “gay” or any minority group. Does the statement now look offensive, or do you recognise that many people would find it so. Pretty sure you would not have said what you did and used the word “Caymanian” now, would you?

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      • Anonymous says:

        You can definitely identify a Jamaican by their driving skills. If you’re from there, you cannot deny it. Just look at the driving practices in Jamaica.

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    • who cares, I do. says:

      8:45pm, you really are prejudice. all of a sudden the worst drivers are jamaicans. yet they are the ones teaching you all to learn to drive. what an irony!

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      • Anonymous says:

        who cares, I do,
        your stupid

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      • Anonymous says:

        Dear who cares, I do;
        I sincerely understand your position but unfortunately quite a few of these bad impatient drivers who are racing around not only in the cars but also the dump trucks are Jamaican’s. As for teaching driving, most of those people are trying to do a good job, but the student must follow properly. I honestly do not think these bad drivers did any learning here but imported the very bad habits from their home country. Hope you do not get too upset.

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      • Anonymous says:

        It is not prejudice when 10 of 12 dead on the roads this year share particular demographic. It becomes fact. Statistically certain.

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        • Anonymous says:

          Jamaica the best country and you sucka’s need us here to do your jobs as you all so lazy. We fix you up!

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      • Anonymous says:

        The TRUTH, while occasionally awkward, is never a lie, and should always be spoken out loud by people who care about their community.

    • Anonymous says:

      Hate to break it to you but Cayman’s accident stats are worse than Jamaica’s.

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  13. Elvis says:

    Stop appealing man.

    Take away their license and double their insurance

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    • Anonymous says:

      7:06 Sadly many people around driving without a license or insurance. Better solution would be to confiscate and impound cars of repeat offenders or those driving dangerously reckless.

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    • Anonymous says:

      And if repeated, revoke their work permits! The amount of this crap that is imported is unconscionable and enabled by our authorities who appear incapable of reading, let alone meaningfully enforcing, our laws. Any of them!

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      • Anonymous says:

        It is not that our authorities are incapable but that they simply do not care about the situation. They get paid regardless so why make any waves!

    • Anonymous says:

      That assumes they have either.

  14. Anonymous says:

    At the three-lane Camana Bay traffic circle, I avoid the centre lane at all costs.

    The amount of people that go from the inside line entering the circle, but weave into the middle lane to exit.

    The amount of people that are in the outside lane that cut across the two other lanes to exit.

    I feel safest on the inside lane so I dont have to worry about anyone on my right. Just have to triple check no idiots are going to cut across me from the other two outer lanes (I have left hand drive so I get a good view).

    (I also see a lot of confused tourists, encountering that circle for the first time, especially Americans who arent used to circles and drive on the other side of the road…Id be a bit confused as well.)

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    • Anonymous says:

      Traffic circle…aka roundabout

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      • Anonymous says:

        Americans in some parts of the country do have circles in their roadways called rotaries instead of roundabouts. These are found mostly in the New England states such as Massachusetts (has the most), but also Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire and Connecticut.
        Driving on the left is not so much a problem on a roundabout, imo, but on small deserted back roads at times when I have to say “ left is right” when I am down there. On a roundabout, I can see the traffic flow as there are many cars entering or exiting.

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        • Anonymous says:

          We have “traffic circles” in New Orleans. One big one we share with streetcars (trollies or trams elsewhere). No problem.

      • Anonymous says:

        This is your takeaway?

    • Anonymous says:

      Sounds like you are part of the problem.

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    • Anonymous says:

      It’s a roundabout. Always has been, always will be.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Umm – if you are in the inside lane because you feel safer, but are not actually turning right or doing a 360, you are going to do exactly what you accuse others of – cutting across 2 other lanes to exit. SMH.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Only problem is, that you should not be in the outside lane attempting to go around. It is legal to be on the inside lane if you’re not coming off on the immediate next exit. By the comments, most people do not know how to use a roundabout correctly.

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  15. Anonymous says:

    Seems like the quarterly reminder pinged up today on the Traffic Dept’s calendar and again we’ve all been trolled by it 🙄🏎

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  16. Anonymous says:

    Photo radar (both static and mobile). Where I am from (Alberta, Canada) used in the larger cities and 99% of drivers obey the speed limit.

    – Cant renew car registration or transfer ownership unless all open fines are paid.

    -Periodic spot checks. Two or more passed due fine and your car is immediately impounded. You can then retrieve it when you show proof of payment.

    Simple. And it works. While at it, add red-light cameras (a red light here seems like just a suggestion to some people).

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    • Anonymous says:

      You assume they care about renewals etc.

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      • Anonymous says:

        That is why you have roadside spot checks. Two or more outstanding fines, car is immediately impounded.

        (And last week, around Governor Square on West Bay Road, the police were electronically checking registration).

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      • Anonymous says:

        Again another lack of enforcement by the rcips

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    • Anonymous says:

      Every damn post about traffic… “where I’m from in Alberta Canada”… you can shove your speed cameras.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Lol. How many of the idiots doing 80 in their $1000 Hondas do you think have $2000 insurance?

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    • Anonymous says:

      We could get Eric Bush to run the procurement exercise – he’s good at picking cameras

  17. Anonymous says:

    We have no less lawlessness, ambient distrust and contempt than one might expect from an absentee enforcement branch. Only a miracle it’s not worse. Those that went through Ivan will recall we remain one hurricane away from automatic weapon firefights, curfews, and martial law. Now is the time to build up the credibility jar.

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  18. Anonymous says:

    The speeds in Cayman just aren’t that high. Even the clowns doing 80 on the dual carriageways. Anywhere else in the world they’d be posted 60 or 70 anyway. The issue is the complete lack of driving skills, car control, awareness or knowledge of even the most basic road rules. A huge number of people on the road here could not hope to pass a real driving test. It’s that simple. The drink driving is nothing here compared to other islands but our accident rate is worse than them all. Our speeds are nothing compared to most countries but our accident rate is ten to twenty times worse.

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  19. Anonymous says:

    Link to evidence of this?

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  20. Anonymous says:

    The UK now has average speed cameras and friends have told me this has virtually stopped all speeding (and caused huge traffic jams), but this is the solution for cayman because it is inefficient and impractical to manually enforce speed limits

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    • Anonymous says:

      Suggest you drive a section of average speed camera road before recommending it. It is miserable. With everyone doing an identical speed you can’t change lane. There is zero evidence they provide safety benefit and are mostly used for motorway speed limits where there are no junctions or turnings. The are effective at keeping very heavy traffic moving slowly.

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    • Anonymous says:

      SPECS aren’t really about speeding they’re about keeping traffic jams moving slowly and steadily.

    • Anonymous says:

      Average speed checks wouldn’t work apart from in one or two areas. Rum Point area being one. All other roads are too short, too many turn-offs, too much traffic.

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  21. Anonymous says:

    It’s nit about speed. Everyone drives over 25 on wbr. It’s about being able to drive. 90 per cent of police vehicles cannot drive properly at 10 mph for example.

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    • Anonymous says:

      So true. People speed everywhere in the world. The lack of knowledge of even basic driving laws here is the problem, as is the fact that nothing is ever enforced.
      They have just repainted double yellow lines along a portion of south church street. Great, except no one has ever been penalized for parking on double yellows here, so what is the point in even having them!? One tiny thing, among hundreds of others that is never enforced. All of these small things lead to the total chaos that is the roads here

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      • Anonymous says:

        100%. People speed everywhere on the planet and at much higher speeds than they do here. People flapping about speed are ignoring the elephant in the room which is that half the people here don’t have real licenses and can’t actually drive. They aren’t safe at the speed limit.

        • Anonymous says:

          I agree! Most persons driving significantly under the speed limit cannot handle a vehicle at higher speeds. They should be removed from the roads as they pose a risk to other competent drivers. Most are very hesitant, start breaking a mile before they exit the road and indicate late if they do so at all.

  22. Anonymous says:

    Almost daily now you witness the motorcycle wheelie guy riding dangerously on one wheel. Why is he so hard to catch?

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    • Anonymous says:

      Bobo cloaking device

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    • Anonymous says:

      Because “he” is “they”. Too many of them.

    • Anonymous says:

      I love seeing that guy. Kid has some skills at least.

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      • Anonymous says:

        He will at some point kill himself and possibly others.

      • Beaumont Zodecloun says:

        He is a hazard. When I was a boy, I drove faaast, and drove in competitions, and four-wheeled and bounced around the place. I was never a danger to anyone but myself and the person I was racing against, as we did our races away from the town centre.

        These fools don’t care who they endanger. They do it for the thrill and for the applause.

        What have you done this week which makes you feel good, but risks the safety or health of others? Do you feel good about it? If so, you are part of the problem.

  23. Anonymous says:

    They do if you work for CIG.

  24. Anonymous says:

    Speed Cameras and mail heavy fines to speeders.

    After 3rd time,if continued to get caught by speed cameras remove their license on a point system basis.

    1 point = 6 months off the road
    2 points = 2 years
    3 points = 4 years

    Are we missing the reason why something like this cant be done here or do I share the same frustrations as everyone else with the lack of effort put into making sure our roads are safe from reckless drivers??

    YES I AM CAYMANIAN.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Yes, the reason why it can’t be done is that no sensible people want the government collecting even more revenue from everyday people while doing nothing to actually improve safety.

      Speed cameras are pointless in a place as small as this. Once everyone knows where they are no one will speed there and speed everywhere else.

      You want to make the roads safer? More frequent DUI checkpoints so that people will actually think twice about drinking and driving.

      That one step alone would probably halve the road deaths.

      Ticketing soccer moms for going 37 in a 30 road solves nothing.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Have to agree with you re dui. A substantial proportion of the population regularly drive after multiple drinks and rcips do very little to enforce the law. Being cynical there appears little will to enforce the law because it would impact the lifestyles of the privileged groups. Its simply another indicator of the staggering levels of arrogance shown towards the normal people, who only matter at voting time. Let there be chaos on the roads, provided we can attend private functions, brunches, etc and drive home afterwards….

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      • Anonymous says:

        The new speed camera technology is average speed cameras. For example one camera at the start of south sound road and one at the rugby club. The cameras measure how fast you cover the distance between the two cameras. If you travel the total distance faster than the allowed speed (eg 5 mph above speed limit) you receive a ticket. There is benefit in slowing down to avoid the camera because the cameras are tracking how fast you travel over the distance between cameras. You literally can’t get away with speeding unless you can somehow avoid getting clocked by the second camera. It’s diabolical and works brilliantly.

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        • Anonymous says:

          New? It’s been on the roads in the UK for 20 years and it sucks. Turns drivers into completely mindless drones.

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        • Anonymous says:

          Speed is not the issue! You and the RCIPS need to get it through your thick skulls! It’s the lack of driving skills and knowledge of the road rules. Giving tickets for non excessive speed does not save lives. For example, giving tickets for not indicating at a roundabout will encourage others to ensure they indicate, improving traffic flow. If they do this, they will be issuing a lot of tickets to fellow policemen.

    • Anonymous says:

      If you suggest that then all our politicians will have chauffeurs, just saying!!!

  25. N says:

    This is the result of decades of almost zero traffic laws enforcement by RCIPS. Everyone knows this. Yet they are “appealing” and “urging” law breakers to slow down??? Again, we all know that does NOT work!
    RCIPS needs to consistently and strategically enforce the traffic laws! That’s it.

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  26. Anonymous says:

    I often speed to pass the car in front of me, then when I reach clear road slow down. Why? Because I’d rather get a ticket (albeit very rarely) than be behind some dick head going into a roundabout that doesn’t know how to stay in a lane, or some moron that thinks it’s okay to cruise in the passing (right) lane, or fails to use their indicators when they should have so obviously done so, like a 270 degree turn around a roundabout… You can tell a mile off whether the person can drive, those that can’t I’ll pass and take my chances, and if and when a cop does pull me over, I’ll happily pay the fine, knowing that my car and family were safer with me travelling a few mile per hour quicker than risk being caught up in accident as some 3rd rate driver (and I’ll include Cayman, Canada and US in there as well as the Jammy’s and Philipino’s) don’t know how to drive. Enforce the rest of the traffic laws… not just speeding.

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  27. Anonymous says:

    Yet, lots of RCIPS, MLAs/MPs, senior Civil Servants and friends can crash their vehicles juiced with their mistresses, flee the scene, and it all goes away, and they get to retain their jobs, titles, and marriages like it never happened. It’s the entire community, including and especially their own.

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    • Anonymous says:

      It is called corruption. It seems they don’t like cameras and automated systems that work perfectly elsewhere. No room to “see nothing”.

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    • Kmatrix says:

      Cite proof or shut the fart up 2:02 pm

      You not lying 🤥 are you?

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  28. Anonymous says:

    Speed tables in all low speed posted residential areas and school districts. Start with Church St. to South Sound Road and Walker Road.

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  29. Anonymous says:

    We can’t always blame the RCIPS for the careless,reckless,irresponsible drivers who use the roadways with lack of care and abandon.

    I drive to work at 5am almost everyday. I have been crossed by cars who are sometimes in excess of double the posted speed limit of 40 mph on the northern end of the ETH.

    I have rarely ever seen a police car on the roads at that time.

    The ETH from WB towards the Yacht Club roundabout (it’s an oval) is very popular for speeders all hours of day and night.

    The RCIPS are there sometimes on the northern end just prior to the last roundabout, usually after 5pm as they are able to stand in the shade to nab unspecting drivers. But they are not there often enough.

    What needs to be employed is speed/radar cameras that capture an image of the car, license plate and occupants.

    The DMV has records of all vehicles on our roads. At least they should…

    Tickers should be auto generated sent to the vehicles owners address, and also attached to the licensing renewal fees. When a person fails to pay a ticket, and then goes to relicense their vehicle, the fine must be paid. Failure to pay, simple. The RCIPS system is alerted that the vehicle is no longer licensed and an outstanding fine exists.

    There are some solutions to curb speeding, this isn’t the only one.

    More effective policing. Better driving practices by those who are there to uphold and enforce the laws.

    Vehicles with the front windshield completely tinted over is illegal.

    Yet, up until last week I watched as a police car crossed a car on the WB road with a completely blacked out windshield.. They never turned around..

    Too many poor examples of bad policing.

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    • Anonymous says:

      But this is the Cayman Islands, where the RCIPS are siloed away from DVDL client records. Matching a plate to owner takes days not milliseconds. That would make too much sense.

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    • Anonymous says:

      all great ideas, not like they don’t know they exist, just don’t care clearly

  30. Anonymous says:

    A friend was caught in the UK recently

    The amount you’re fined depends on what the speed limit was and how much over it you were driving. It’s usually a percentage of your weekly income, up to a maximum of £1,000 (£2,500 if you were driving on a motorway).

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  31. Anonymous says:

    It’s almost cultural at this point. Practically zero barrier to entry to own a car (compared to everyone’s home country), lax enforcement, and lot of drivers’ source of identity and enrichment (rather than function).

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    • Anonymous says:

      Interesting! So if the RCIPS has no eyes into DVDL data, why don’t DVDL “hire” enforcement agents?

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  32. Anonymous says:

    We don’t want to work with you RCIP. We want you to enforce the laws! Why is it so hard?

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  33. Anonymous says:

    More talk but no action will be taken. The roads are survival of the fastest anymore. Hell Stevie Wonder could catch these crazy drivers but our wonderful police department just talks a good story but can not produce any results.

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  34. Anonymous says:

    There has been almost 0 police presence for years. You think its going to change over night? I dont know what to say. Keep doing your jobs, don’t slack off and it will change. My thing is that I don’t have faith that the RCIPS is capable of continuing control. They just don’t have the competence.

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    • Anonymous says:

      I do not think that they have the guts to crack down on these dangerous drivers as most are from their homeland. Maybe there could be repercussions?

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  35. Anonymous says:

    This makes my blood boil. RCIPS once again is addressing the death-trap roads by “urging” the public to follow the law. If “urging” made a difference, we wouldn’t be seeing the increase in the number of people killed on our roads. Yea, those sanctions are tough, but they don’t mean anything if people don’t get to Court, and that won’t have a chance of happening unless the police are enforcing the law. Do your job and stop the condescending tone. Enough!

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    • Anon says:

      The roads are fine. The caymanian drivers just can’t drive.

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      • Anonymous says:

        According to the statistics, it is not so much the Caymanian drivers that are the problem.

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        • Anonymous says:

          Really? Please provide a link to these made up statistics.

          • Anonymous says:

            Road deaths and serious accidents are posted on most new outlets. Let’s assume you missed them, but if you go back and take a look you’ll see most of the drivers were not Caymanian but rather from a neighbouring jurisdiction.

  36. Anonymous says:

    Whereare the police? I dont see them with any speed traps
    ..maybe i out at wrong time…

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  37. Anonymous says:

    Can somebody in govt put forwards a proposal to reduce the legal blood alcohol limit? Cayman is out of step with the rest of the world on this including many countries which have a heavy reliance on private vehicles for transportation.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Legal limit is 20% higher than rest of the world, DUI is only a misdemeanor Traffic offense, and complete absence of credible enforcement, all play to the status quo.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Why?

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    • Anonymous says:

      Anyone who is under the current alcohol legal limit is more than capable of driving a car safely. The current legal limit is not the problem.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Doesn’t make a huge difference since Cayman’s binge drinkers are alcoholic grade and would blow two or three times the limit if they were caught, even with limit at .10%

  38. Anonymous says:

    If they cared that much they would have roadblocks at the parking lot exit of the Strand every weekend instead of ticketing people doing 38 in a 30 on their way to work at 7:45 on a Monday morning.

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    • Anonymous says:

      100% this. Ten over on ridiculous low limit roads like WB road (25mph??)

      That’s not dangerous. To be honest, 20mph over on ETH isn’t really dangerous either.

      Involve alcohol and any driving becomes more dangerous and speeding for sure makes it worse. Hence all of these single vehicle accidents in the middle of the night.

      The real danger, that causes far more accidents than speeding is texting and driving and bad roundabout use. I would love to see police try harder to catch texters and I would even argue that being caught should result in big fines and second offence should be a one month licence suspension. That might encourage changed behaviour.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Eth from alt to west bay could easily be a 60 and would be almost anywhere else but the numpties can’t stay in lane or drive around a bend at 25 let alone 40.

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  39. Anonymous says:

    this is because of the stupid speeds limits.

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  40. Anonymous says:

    why is the jamaican licsense accepted here when it is not accepted in the uk?
    will wait for answer.

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    • Anonymous says:

      You’ll be waiting a very long time!

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    • Anonymous says:

      Probably because it’s our largest and closest work permit labour market. Bad driving has no defining nationality in the Cayman Islands.

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      • Anonymous says:

        What’s the difference between a stereotype and a reputation? Asking for a Jamaican taxi driver friend.

      • Anonymous says:

        Actually, according to the death statistics, it does. 90% prospect that NOT a Caymanian. 85% prospect that it IS a Jamaican. Tragic and unnecessary.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Our accident statistics are worse than Jamaica’s.

  41. Anonymous says:

    free money making solution:
    treble all speeding fines.
    bring in private run traffic police who are funded by fines.
    cig will makes 10x times as much on fines.
    police can then do real work or we can reduce their numbers.
    win-win-win.

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    • Anonymous says:

      But real work and traffic policing are the same. There are many benefits to police actually policing the roads. Unfortunately here, we’re not blessed with fit for purpose traffic laws or traffic department.

  42. Anonymous says:

    I’m a law-abiding citizen and I’m sick to death of the RCIPS’s lack of true commitment to fixing our appalling driving and their repetitive, bland appeals following road accidents and unpalatable statistics. Nobody, NOBODY, takes any notice of those statements, and they know it. But they still keep parroting them.

    We all know that the police institutionally ignore wrongdoers on the road and have done so for years. Every time we go on the roads we see law-breakers whom the police have turned a blind eye to. And so the carnage goes on, and it’s invariably followed by a police appeal to slow down, or something equally fatuous.

    Until someone with imagination starts to look at the structural and institutional questions surrounding this issue, and as long as the police are accountable to nobody except the governor, this will continue. It’s high time the RCIPS became accountable to us, the people – specifically a committee of furious citizens who can tell them to get off their backsides and crack down on killers on the road – or lose their jobs.

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  43. Anonymous says:

    Can the police also start penalising people who drive way below the speed limit? This is just as dangerous too!

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    • Anonymous says:

      How many deaths have involved people driving below the speed limit? Lighten up your attitude and your foot on the gas pedal.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Don’t think you’re getting it. Slow drivers and these clowns hogging the outside lane cause impatient clowns to make daft manoeuvres thereby indirectly causing accidents and fatalities.

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  44. LittleMissStewBeef says:

    Cameras that can detect speeding and and running of red lights, and initiate an automatic ticket would be an asset. These systems exist, they don’t have to be reinvented.
    Making taxis more user friendly and changing the culture so that customers don’t feel that they will be taken advantage can encourage more people to use their services when the person is not in a position to drive safely, could be of huge benefit. Systems to facilitate this exist and do not have to be reinvented. Cayman is really not that unique.
    Having an effective public transport system could overhaul so many things in these islands and ease the burden of enforcement of our current traffic situations and possibly reduce the number of sad incidents.
    We can really do better.

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  45. Kmatrix says:

    A prolonged Public service announcements campaign on all of the social media and radio stations will go a long ways in sensitizing the populace.

    The one in a while announcement cannot be expected to penetrate
    people minds.

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  46. Anonymous says:

    The police force is focusing more on traffic related issues, meanwhile i have low life insects prowling through my yard and trying car door’s early in the mornings. Seems they are doing a great job policing neighborhood’s. SMH

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  47. Anonymous says:

    Policing is number one issue. 9-5 Policing does work. Police stationed at strategic location HOURLY and DAILY would help.

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  48. Anonymous says:

    There needs to be a specific offense of driving in the incorrect lane and causing an obstruction – i.e. the outside lane when not overtaking. The lane furthest from the curb is ONLY to be used when overtaking slower traffic (while still within the speed limit), or for approaching a junction or roundabout where you plan to turn right.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Says the drunk speeder.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Does anyone know why people insist on using this right hand outer lane furthest from the curb? I cant see what it achieves except the satisfaction of thumbing your nose up to the police and saying “look at me I can break the law”

  49. Anonymous says:

    We need some mystery shoppers to test out the driving instructors on the island. I’ve seen three terrible examples recently from people under formal driving instruction. They were instructed to use the wrong lane, or to incorrectly navigate a roundabout, and other very obvious driving mistakes that would have failed a driving test in the UK. If that is how they are taught, and still manage to pass the test, it is no wonder driving standards are so shockingly low here. Driving instructors and examiners are to blame for not knowing how to drive correctly themselves!

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  50. WBW Czar. says:

    Give me Uber or Flex and i’ll stop.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Clearly there already is Flex, and you know about it, because why else would you invoke that Cayman-based app? Sober up.

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