UK peer’s bill seeks gay marriage law for BOTs

| 07/07/2022 | 113 Comments
Lord Michael Cashman at a Gay Pride Parade in London

(CNS): Lord Michael Cashman has introduced a private member’s bill in the UK House of Lords to make same-sex marriage lawful in all British Overseas Territories that don’t have marriage equality, including the Cayman Islands. If it passes, it would require the Caribbean territories to legalise same-sex marriage and empower the governors to roll out the legislation. The bill would introduce equal civil marriage for all couples but protects individuals and organisations from being compelled to conduct religious same-sex marriages.

The bill had its first reading on Wednesday and a date will now be set for the next stage in the process towards becoming law.

“This bill has one single purpose, and that is to bring about equality,” Lord Cashman said. “Currently, same-sex couples can marry in the UK but are prohibited from marrying in six British Overseas Territories. This is wrong, and the UK Parliament can and should act to end this obvious inequity. I believe this Bill has wide support among all those who favour equality over discrimination and are committed to upholding fundamental human rights.”

In response to this news, Governor Martyn Roper issued a short statement: “I understand the Private Members’ Bill introduced by Lord Michael Cashman in the UK’s House of Lords on same sex marriage in the Overseas Territories including the Cayman Islands has little chance of progressing. It is not a Government Bill and it is not yet clear if it will even be debated.”

However, many people are confident the bill does have a chance of becoming law.

Colours Caribbean, the local LGBTI advocacy group that worked with Lord Cashman’s team to draft the legislation, welcomed the bill, saying it would redress the inequities in the Caribbean territories and bring them inline with all of the other UK territories where same-sex marriage is legal.

“If this bill succeeds, it will not face the threat of being reversed by local courts on the grounds of constitutional incompatibility as the governors of every applicable jurisdiction will be empowered and required by Act of the UK Parliament to make provision for… civil marriage of same-sex couples,” said Colours in a press release.

“We look forward to the passing of the bill. Marriage equality has officially come to the forefront of the agenda and soon all British Overseas Territories in the Caribbean will enjoy the same rights with the same name, ending the anomaly of depriving us of the right to equality enjoyed by all British citizens in the entirety of the UK, the three Crown Dependencies and the rest of the British Overseas Territories.”

Meanwhile, attorney Dr Leonardo Raznovich, who also worked on the legislation, said the recent decisions of the Privy Council against equal marriage for both Bermuda and the Cayman Islands meant the UK had failed to protect vulnerable minorities in its territories.

“The UK Parliament through this Bill aims to correct the serious injustices that the Privy Council’s decisions
have manifested,” he said. “It will put an end to the unjustified discrimination and segregation on grounds of sexual orientation that British citizens face in relation to access to equal marriage in Bermuda, the Cayman Islands, the British Virgin Islands, Anguilla, Monserrat and the Turks and Caicos.”

He pointed out that BVI, Anguilla, Monserrat and TCI have no local legislation in place at all to protect LGBTI people. As a result, the bill will ensure marriage equality for all British citizens.

“This Bill does not take anything from anyone but rather achieves a levelling up of disenfranchised vulnerable minorities with the rest of society,” Raznovich said. “By bringing about full equality to these Territories, as Colours Caribbean has been advocating for many years, it will mean that… couples will no longer need to seek exile in other parts of the UK and its territories away from their homeland, families and friends,” he added.


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Category: Laws, Politics

Comments (113)

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  1. Anonymous says:

    No thank you Sir, we already have an erosion of our culture and values, this is why you are in England and we are called the Cayman Islands, please do not try to make us like over there.

    We have more important issues to address such as the erosion and quality of our family life due to the high cost of living which means longer than necessary working hours for breadwinners. We do not have labor unions here, and workers are exploited because there is no systems in place that have teeth to deal with employment and discrimination. So please extend the Modern Slavery Act to these islands where greedy firms abuse workers by not providing sufficient staff causing staff to work 12-16hrs a day regularly without compensation in time or money. Several industries like our financial services industry could do with job sharing to cater for different time zones, because the expectations of staff are unreasonable and abusive. Family lives are affected by these practices and the health of employees suffer. A law like the French would also assist in preventing employees to be contacted outside of a normal day by any means would improve our wellness and quality of life. These are the priorities we need Sir.

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    • Anonymous says:

      So basically ‘Don’t help us in this area – none of your business;’ but ‘Help us here in this area?’ ‘We wish to remain in the 1600’s in this area of ethics and morals, but want the benefits of 2022 in other areas.’ Hmnnn, very telling. No wonder Bush gets re-elected.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Hardly the case, the writer is basically saying that if you want to help us do something that is beneficial to Cayman. Bush is irrelevant here.

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  2. anonymous says:

    I reckon HE has figured out, and rightly so, that this latest move is something of an exercise in futility. The irony is, of course, that this appeal is being made not to a duly elected government or a democratically elected parliament, but rather to an unelected body of individuals whose numbers include those of questionable ancestral behaviour in regard to respect for their fellow countrymen’s human rights, to put it mildly. The notion that this anachronistic body (which many in the UK have long called to be abolished) can succeed in anything of the sort proposed is pure fantasy, surely.

  3. anonymous says:

    The key to understanding the Governor’s lukewarm response to the news that a member of the House of Lords is proposing this legislation lies with a knowledge of what the House of Lords is and who its sitting members are. In case anyone is unaware, the House of Lords is an entirely unelected body. None of its members have been elected. They have either inherited their membership or (in more recent times) been appointed by the government.

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    • Anonymous says:

      And look what you get. Really should get rid of them. Or just bring them out whenever the Queen is on hand.

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  4. anonymous says:

    Folks, before we all get too excited, please bear in mind that the House of Lords is an unelected body, and all of its members are unelected individuals. Some are there from ancient and traditionally blood thirsty ancestry, while others (in more modern times) by appointment. Which probably accounts for the Governor’s lukewarm reaction to the news that one of their number has taken the opportunity to assume a leading role of sorts and get his mug in a photoshoot. All very gripping, but not of very much use in the long run.

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  5. Anonymous says:

    My support ends at LGB, the rest is just nonsense.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Imagine claiming someone’s identity is nonsense. How pathetic can you be?

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      • Anonymous says:

        It is nonsense. Saying you identify as something you’re not is equivalent of pretending to be something you aren’t. I definitely agree people should be free to do what they want and if they want to pretend to be something they aren’t then fine. Just don’t expect society to play along and buy into it…

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  6. Anonymous says:

    Love Is Love. Let’s hope the Exorcists leave people be.

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  7. MR says:

    Can someone please confirm what the “+” is for?

    There are a lot of people that feel the “+” is too open and is making pedophiles believe that they too have a platform in all these efforts – and that all the hard work and sacrifices same-sex couples have made to seek equality and freedom to love, marry and live includes pedophilia as well.

    I think that it is time prominent leaders in the LGBTQIA+ community get vocal and let the world know it does NOT support pedophilia AT ALL, in any way, whatsoever!!!

    As there are many more people who want to be more supportive and aide in the movement but are very hesitant because this “+” leaves questions and is very open-ended and people cannot be sure exactly who is benefiting from the millions of dollars in marketing and promotions to gain inclusion for the growing LGBTQIA+ group.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Nice dog whistle you got there. Faux support coupled with a good old fashioned recitation of the old allegation that gay people are associated with paedophilia. Prominent leaders NEED to justify that they don’t support peadoohilia. On the basis that asmccirding to you there is a question to be answered, without any evidence whatsoever that there is an association. Well if we follow that logic how about the Cayman Ministers Association let the country know that they don’t support paedophilia. Ridiculous – but damn sight more evidence for religious institutions being involved in paedophilia than LGBTQIA ones.

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      • MR says:

        They aren’t the Cayman Ministers+ Association….

        Fact is, the LGBTQIA+ is entirely based around sexual preference – if anyone should be carving out what they stand for it would obviously be the forever broadening group for which its explicit purpose is defending sexual preference and normalizing (what used to be minority) sexual fetishes.

        Sure, there are the persons fighting to love who they want and marry who they wish – and then there are the many who want the rights to have sex anywhere, with anyone (or anything) they want to.

        So, I am just saying, in order to protect the work that the LGBTQIA+ people who fought for love and respect have done and separate it from those who want to catch their tailwind to promote their own sinister sex fetishes – LGBTQIA+ leaders should come out and publicly condemn the pedophilia lifestyle -is that so hard?

        If any group has access to public platforms and media support right now it is the LGBTQIA+ group – it would be great to use that support and media power to save 18 month old babies’ privates from being torn apart by sadistic adult men – don’t ya think???

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        • watcher says:

          I didn’t realise there was any need for any sentient people to vilify pedophiles. I don’t know of a single person who wouldn’t condemn pedophiles. Why do you think a group of people should proclaim their beliefs?

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          • MR says:

            Pedophilia has become a billion dollar industry of child sex trafficking and video recorded rape of minors – it is VERY obvious there are many, many sickos the support it.

    • Anonymous says:

      OMG… Another FOX news idi.t with false conspiracy issues that are simply fiction and untrue. Trying to defocus from the matter at hand with garbage nonsense to rile up the ‘moral righteous’ who will protect our kids… Please go find another cause to claim and promote as needed – like tin foil hats.

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    • asurvivor says:

      Spoken by a probably religious person (catholic maybe?) whose leaders have a horrible record of hundreds of years of abusive towards children. Gotta love Cayman’s morally blind folks.

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      • Anonymous says:

        You sound like one of those atheists who want to abolish all religions. Gotta love you imported people who just want everything changed to how it is in your homeland. God Bless you anyway

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        • Anonymous says:

          Um, I’m a caymanian atheist. Now what?

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        • Anonymous says:

          7:44 here: Guilty as charged, and proud of it. I treat folks nicely, am respectful to those that are respectful to me (even if we hold different views), and I don’t need to go to a building to be a moral person. Never strayed from my wife of 38 years, raised 3 children to be ethical, responsible adults. I know too many folks that go to church every week; abuse their spouses (BF/GF), are simply bigoted, misognistic, racist people. If this is insulting, then I assume you are one of those! If you are not, then there is no insult to you.

  8. Anonymous says:

    Given the current events in Whitehall and the poor performance of the UK government post brexit and during the pandemic, somehow Lord Cashman and others has found time to concentrate his efforts in meddling with OT territory affairs ? Your prime minister just quit and your priority is forcing same sex marriage legislation in another land ? Tisk Tisk. Speaking of vulnerable people: A better use of time and resources would be to assist those who complied with stay and home and social distancing orders, and suffered mentally and physically as a result. Some paid the ultimate cost with their life, while entitled UK politicians flaunted Covid-19 restrictions and rules as they drank and socialised At No. 10. Multiple times…

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    • Anon says:

      It speaks volumes that you don’t know the difference between “flouted” and “flaunted”, but by all means go ahead and be “another land” and save the UK taxpayer a small fortune.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Here we are fighting spell check, and you’re acting all superior. Speaks volumes.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Great that you spotted those minor details, I’m sure that MA in English has paid dividends for you. But if you’re gonna comment, care to debate the poster’s actual points rather than pontificate on meaningless degression ?

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  9. Anonymous says:

    Should be passed immediately and abortion legalized too. Disgraceful such laws are still as they are in a British territory that tries to call itself modern. Living in the Stone Age by not allowing gay marriage or abortion in cayman.

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    • Anonymous says:

      This is what we get for being dominated by ignorant, uneducated, immoral, male dominated, religious zealots that pay for votes from an uneducated electorate. How much did the MacBeater win his district by? And then be awarded the Speaker’s seat. Cayman should be ashamed at such a result and has allowed this completely unqualified individual to remain in a position of power. Cayman has no excuse for the sad state of our government when this is the best we have to elect.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Yes, let us start murdering the unborn, why should they have a right to live? Who cares about the evidence that an unborn child feels pain during the abortion procedure? We know best, it is our body and my right trumps that of the unborn. As Ronald Reagan once said “I have noticed that those who are pro-abortion have already been born”. Anyone else find it strange that a supporter of life is called ‘pro-life” but a supporter of abortion is called ‘pro-choice’ not ‘pro-death’. But you see the ‘pro-choice’ people will start name calling and introducing religion as the cause of all this and all other kinds of straw man arguments, but let us remember moral standards do not need a religious rule or decree, because after all we are not living in the stone age right?

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      • Anonymous says:

        Using Ronald Reagan as a supporter for equal rights for women is very telling of your understanding (lack of) of history. Take your garbage non-rational arguments to another country that lives in the morals of the 1600’s.

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      • Anonymous says:

        What a warped view you have. Any woman should be able to choose whether they abort or have a baby. Especially in early stages when it’s just a collection of cells.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Why does anyone care if two people of the same sex love each other and want to live together? Is it illegal? If so, why?

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      • Anonymous says:

        If it were only that it would be so bad but we now have trans people who are entering sporting events as women when they were born men and taking full advantage of their male
        Attributes

        • Anonymous says:

          Different issue. They should be allowed to marry and have marriage rights. BUT, I also agree that growing up with male hormones and benefitting from 16 years of a male bio-chemistry should disqualify them from competing against women who have grown up with a different bio-chemistry. Trans folks have rights, but so does a level playing field in athletics – I am in full support of banning those who did not grow up with the physical attributes of those they now desire to compete with. They can advocate for a category of their own.

    • anonymous says:

      Goodness, you appear to be suggesting that only those you (and other likeminded individuals)) assess as thinking rightly should be allowed to participate in the democratic process in the Cayman Islands. History is replete with examples of where this very dangerous approach can lead humanity. It has never ended well, my friend.

  10. Beaumont Zodecloun says:

    I don’t care who you sleep with (as long as they are consenting adults). I don’t care who you love. I want for you and everyone the SAME rights and equality afforded me. Nothing less will do. No band-aid stopgap measure. FULL equality. Anything less degrades us all, because it makes us complicit.

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  11. Anonymous says:

    While I support same-sex marriage I think that the UK needs to focus on dealing with all of the pedophiles, rapists and freaks that they have as elected members of Parliament.

    The Cayman Islands needs to act in a mature manner and do what is right and make same-sex marriage legal. There is no need for the UK to get involved in this matter.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Cayman will NOT ‘do what is right.’ Have you not been aware of the many, many issues it has failed to act in any basic sense of logic? YES, the UK must mandate what we will not. Our Ministers are/have failed us for too long.

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    • Anonymous says:

      One can multitask. Same sex marriage never stopped anyone from achieving other goals. Just do it. Stop finding excuses.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Do same sex couples have to be married? Why?

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      • Beaumont Zodecloun says:

        That isn’t the issue.

        Please list for us those individuals which shouldn’t be allowed to marry, in your opinion, and why not.

        That is the issue.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Many reasons, but the issue is that they are being prevented. So for the current reality of the Caymanian laws, the question is why are we following morals that are not accepted for the majority of the electorate. We are being ruled by a minority, male dominated, conservative dominated elite. Yes, this is the case in other countries, but that doesn’t make it proper.

  12. Anonymous says:

    The UK should never legislate for the Cayman Islands.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Cayman desperately needs the UK to do what we will not. Only when Cayman begins to get educated and have a history of legal and ethical standards can we stand on our own. That is not where we are at.

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      • Anonymous says:

        The Caymanian PUBLIC (private is another matter) education culture is clearly decades away from any semblance of quality. Just re-read the last published scores for students. World class??????? Not even second world class. Maybe a tick above third world class. And this is from a Territory that is flush with money from real estate and financial services? Smells like the dead fish of corruption, money laundering and political payoffs.

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        • Anonymous says:

          Corruption, money laundering and political payoffs are what makes the Cayman Islands what they are! If the government didn’t have control of it very few people would have any interest coming here……. Well, maybe our diving fiends….. Am I correct?

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      • Anonymous says:

        The UK is a shyt hole. Sorry to say.

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      • anonymous says:

        Hang on a minute, you cannot possibly be suggesting that the U.K. has a history of legal and ethical standards which Cayman should emulate. I mean, try spinning that yarn to the Windrush generation, to cite one example among many.

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        • Anonymous says:

          You are correct, Cayman should aspire to be better than the history of the UK. But as of now, it is aspiring (and succeeding) to be worse. The UK tends to eventually correct it’s direction – Cayman does not.

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    • Anonymous says:

      …ummm, except to abolish slavery, right? It was OK for them to do it that time? Oh, and to give effect to our constitution and bill of rights. That was OK too, right?

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    • Anonymous says:

      Direct rule is really the only option at this point.

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      • Anonymous says:

        HIghway to hell… Be careful of what you ask for – your Ministers and power brokers could give a rats as. for your well-being.

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  13. Anonymous says:

    He was rubbish in Eastenders.

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  14. Anonymous says:

    About time, equality means full equality and nothing less.

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    • Anonymous says:

      And does this mean that two people of the same sex have to be married to live together? WHY do they need a marriage licence? I don’t want the government telling me who I can live with! I see nothing horrible about two people of the same sex living together. The government should not tell anyone who they can live with. It’s not their business!

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      • Beaumont Zodecloun says:

        Nobody is concerned with who lives with whom. The question is, why are any people being prevented from legally marrying?

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      • URDumbasarock says:

        You are missing the point. The Gov’t is saying opposite sex marriage is allowed, and same sex marriage is not allowed. By your own argument, ‘It’s not their business!’

        I know of many marriages between a woman and a man that was horribly incompatable/abusive/no respect from each. And I know of same sex marriages that were far superior in compatability and respect between the individuals.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Rubbish! Men and women are not the same….. and you can’t change it.

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  15. Anonymous says:

    The UK should stay out of Cayman Affairs and stop trying to create bills that are self-serving. If CIG would fix its internal policies in the Civil Service and not interpret part of the law based on the department the current system would suffice.

    Nothing against LGBT but I am not supporting anything done in the UK that is forced upon the Cayman Islands.

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  16. end the bigotry says:

    Wonderful news. Come on, members of UK Parliament: Do the right thing by mandating equality for ALL your citizens, and thereby put an end to the long-festering bigotry. It’s sad that Cayman and certain other territories have to be forced, but if that’s what it takes, so be it. (The truth is, Cayman is more than ready to take this step on its own. But certain government ministers — ever dependent on church donations — resist. SHAME ON THEM.)

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    • Anonymous says:

      And we welcome direct taxation as well. You cannot expect to have your cake and eat it too…

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  17. Dr Leonardo Raznovich says:

    The Governor’s short statement comes across as rather dismissive. This is regrettable. The issue with His Excellency’s statement is that, while factually it may be correct, the responsible and decent position for such a leader to take would have been to seize the opportunity to articulate that the U.K. encourages and expects all its territories to embrace equality, which includes marriage equality, as His Excellency is very well aware. The short statement without that very important message comes across, hence, as dismissive and disrespectful of LGBTI+ people, especially in those British Overseas Territories where there are absolutely no legal rights or protections whatsoever under the watch of the U.K. and their Governors. I look forward to His Excellency clarifying his short statement and will be liaising with the U.K. FCDO in respect of the same.

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    • governor postures says:

      You are so right, Dr. Leo. In fact, the moment I read the governor’s statement, I said to myself: This is nothing but political posturing and likely isn’t even true.

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    • Rodney Barnett says:

      I concur with the above statement of Dr. Raznovich, however I cannot bring myself to state it in such a diplomatic way.

      As a resident of Cayman who happens to be homosexual, I am a personal example of discrimination by the CIG. In my case, my marriage was recognized by one department of the government, but NOT recognized by another. This is an actual fact, and to me is a sad indication of the turmoil in government where it is trying to appease various conflicting tribes living (and voting) on-island.

      I would have thought better for a country that looks at itself as the most modern of Caribbean governments.😒

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    • Anonymous says:

      Obviously this Lord Cashman has too much free time on his hand. If he wants to be relevant he should go find a pond somewhere and feed the birds.

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      • Anonymous says:

        spoken like a true idiot

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      • anonymous says:

        A wonderful suggestion – and maybe he could get the taxpaying public to purchase a duckhouse for his pond like that MP did a while back. I mean it’d be doing his bit for the natural environment, after all. What a wonderfully upright crew the U.K. has in its legislature – an example for all to copy.

    • Anonymous says:

      The Governor’s statement is simply a realistic comment upon the likelihood of any private member’s Bill actually becoming law. The UK Government’s position on marriage equality has already been made abundantly clear on numerous occasions in the past. Calling the Governor’s comment “dismissive and disrespectful” is simply looking for offence where none was intended, or should ever have been taken, and does nothing at all to advance what is an entirely laudable goal.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Not true. Seeing as the governor was the one who put through the civil partnership act, and seeing as he marched in the gay parade, there is plenty of reason to have expected that he would indicate support for the gay marriage bill being offered in Parliament. Dr. Leo was entirely correct.

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        • Anonymous says:

          The Governor does not make decisions like that in relation to the civil partnership act unilaterally- he takes direction from the FCDO. He simply isn’t in a position to decide on his own to support a private members bill on behalf of the UK Government.

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        • anonymous says:

          The Governor is the Queen’s representative. When was the last time the Queen spoke openly in support of any piece of proposed legislation? Some may consider the Governor’s open support as having stepped outside of his given role. The point is that the governor’s personal views are an irrelevance. Also, he did not “put through the civil partnership act” because he agreed with it. He was directed by the U.K. government to do so. He did not have the authority to not do so.

      • Anonymous says:

        As the Governor shouldn’t he know better? In a position of leadership you need to be extremely conscious that words may have an impact and unintended harm, particularly where they relate to an already vulnerable sector of society and don’t instil them with hope.

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    • Anonymous says:

      @8:32: Leo, Leo, Leo…
      You allow that His Excellency’s statement may be factual. Indeed, the chance of this private member’s bill becoming law is slim. Why should you become offended at unadorned facts? Governor Roper said he understands that the bill has little chance of being debated much less passing. He is saying this is his understanding. Meaning that, using the official insight and channels that he has into the inner working of UK politics, he decided to deliver the brief stark truth. What is wrong with that? If truth offends you, you are part of the larger problem. You are offended because the Governor did not pander to your activist agenda. Oh boo freaking hoo! Tissue?

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      • Anonymous says:

        @8:13 pm – Leo’s message indicates the hard truth wasn’t the issue, the problem here based on my reading of Leo’s message, which seems quite clear, was the failure to articulate the U.K. government’s position on marriage equality and its hope and expectation that all territories will embrace equality, ie. by their own accord without intervention of the U.K. There should be encouragement not discouragement is essentially the point being made. It’s a very important message and important to get the balance right, especially where equal marriage has been taken away in one territory (throwing peoples lives into turmoil) and in 4 other territories there are zero rights or protections, these circumstances amounting to serious breaches of international law for which the Governors in those territories are ultimately responsible to correct given failure of local governments to act and legislate. The Governor had a responsibility to everyone to convey that point.

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        • Anonymous says:

          10:06, your dissertation clearly suggest that some aggressive activists deem that anything that does not loudly promote your agenda is an offense, and every person who is not your cheerleader is offensive to you. Life is like that. Not all news is encouraging, nor should it be. Not all people are automatically cookie-cutter adherents to your agenda. Roper related what several practical UK political observers have noted. If the news of truth is “discouraging” to you, may I offer you a tissue? As a lover of truth, I should be very offended at the instances of mindless hyperbole related by Dr. Leo in the article. I am not. I expect no better from aggressive activists for whom their agenda is more important that facts and truth. Sadly, this is all-too-often true of activists on both sides of the Alphabet+ issue. In parting, I shall proffer this reasoning puzzle for you to solve: How will the UK government’s actual extant position regarding marriage equality–vis a vis the Cayman Islands–be manifest? Perhaps, and wisely so, His Excellency is awaiting this to be revealed.

    • Anonymous says:

      Hey doc what does the “+” mean? Please clarify.

      CNS: Google is your friend. See What Does LGBTQ+ Mean?

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    • anonymous says:

      You refer to HE as “such a leader” which tells me that you misunderstand the position and role of this particular office. The Governor is the Queen’s representative and as such is under the direction of the democratically elected U.K. government. The Governor is not like a president or emperor who can “rule” us in a way that he considers best for us, or “fair” or “reasonable” or equitable”. In other words the Governor does not represent a ruling monarch of yesteryear by any stretch of the imagination, and however inconvenient this might be for those on either side of any issue, including the one at present.

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  18. Anonymous says:

    The Cayman Islands is woefully incapable of governing itself. We elect criminals, advance racist, misogynist and archaic morals grounded in white, male control over those of color and women… But, will not enforce laws, take bribes for votes, cannot fix our traffic, rubbish and employment problems because we do not have the will to make hard decisions. And yet we are a world leader in shielding money launderers, and desire to remain the lap-dog to money.

    YES, Cayman, we need to have our diapers changed by mommy and daddy (UK) as we are infants as a territory. Some day we may grow up and become educated and steeped in wisdom, but that time has not come.

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    • Anonymous says:

      The corrupt form of democracy that plagues most western countries and is so open to abuse from ballot box fraud to “elected” officials not even bothering to seek input from their constituents.
      True democracy is when all the people have all the say ALL the time.
      As someone who has worked in technology for over 30 years, I can safely say that this is totally doable. 97% of people will vote by phone and the few outliers can be processed quickly.
      We are buying, selling, investing and communicating on our devices all day, a simple vote is no big deal.

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      • anonymous says:

        The extent to which one can agree or disagree with your opening paragraph’s contentions depends, of course, entirely on individual experience, but I do agree that (Italian satellites aside!) voting electronically has the potential to expand voting opportunities, which has to be a good thing for democracy.

        However, if you are at all implying that the democratically elected members in our parliament have a position on the issue in question that is contrary to the overwhelming wishes of the people of the Cayman Islands, I fear that you are, with all due respect, profoundly mistaken.

    • Anonymous says:

      Seriously? Have you been paying attention to the ‘mature’ manner in which Mother handles political leadership?

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      • Anonymous says:

        Yes we have been paying attention, 10:56. He just resigned, showing the system works in the “Mother” country. Contrast that with here and the ongoing elevation of a drunken woman beater to one of the highest positions in Cayman!!!! Seriously!

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      • Anonymous says:

        I’ll take the system across the pond as opposed to watching the MacBeater dishonor us every day he sits at a position of power over me! Every gov’t system has flaws, Cayman’s is completely corrupt to it’s core and has been for many election cycles. Sorry to inform you, our Ministers are not up to the quality of the UK – their system can/has corrected corruption; we cannot/will not.

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    • anonymous says:

      Strewth, with parents like the U.K. Cayman might well want to put itself up for adoption.

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  19. Anonymous says:

    It’s going to happen, just be ready to accept it.

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  20. Anonymous says:

    Great news. It is disgusting that the Cayman Islands Government is ignoring marriage certificates of homosexual persons, even where the marriage certificate is British, and that we are effectively requiring and maintaining a register of homosexuals. Truly sickening in 2022.

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    • Anonymous says:

      It’s truly a black mark on Cayman’s history that we continue to need an external power forcing us to adopt basic human rights. Looking forward to the impotent baby rage if/when this becomes a law.

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    • Michael says:

      A register of homosexuals? Where do I go to register? I’ve never been asked.

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