Construction to lead local economic recovery

| 13/05/2020 | 156 Comments

(CNS): The rebuilding of Cayman’s economy will start with the return of the construction industry, and on Tuesday the first workers will return to the job sites that were already operating when the COVID-19 shelter-in-place order was first issued. Premier Alden McLaughlin explained Wednesday that the whole sector can’t return as there are around 1,900 registered construction firms, which, coupled with reopened hardware stores, would release up to 9,000 people into the workforce.

The government is therefore going to take a phased approach based on the number of active contractors who were already working on projects in March, McLaughlin said at Wednesday’s press briefing.

The premier has placed great stock on the importance of construction and development to the rebuilding of the economy. With local workers needing to go back to work and permit holders in this sector still here, this is one area of the domestic economy that McLaughlin believes can help the community get through the difficult times ahead.

Balancing the increased risk of the virus spreading after largely managing to curtail it and protect the vulnerable from the disease, the reopening of this sector is going to be a closely monitored, with a focus on testing those returning to construction sites.

The premier has previously stated that the sites will be subject to health and safety inspections. They will be required to follow hygiene and, where possible, social distancing protocols, and management must provide workers with areas to frequently wash their hands and ensure they have access to food.

McLaughlin said that reopening development and construction was key to what government is trying to do when it comes to meeting future economic challenges. He said this sector can “go a long way to help plug that huge gap” with the loss of tourism.

See the press briefing on CIGTV below:


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Category: Business, Construction, Jobs, Local News

Comments (156)

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  1. Anonymous says:

    We’re a couple with different surnames ( that’s the nature of couples ) our household is TWO. Swimming on ones self is not necessarily safe. The beach might as well be closed to my household. We have adhered to the rules. We have been patient.
    I 100% understand the purpose but I fail to see how the two of us from one household are any more of a threat than one of us in fact on the contrary if I go one day and my partner went the next your doubling the risk of my household contact.
    Your thinking social distancing … yes so are we but the two of us going together is exactly the same.
    I’m actually now at the end of my tether and starting to climb the walls. I need the excercise and walking the roads near my home gets more dangerous everyday but only one us is allowed to drive elsewhere on any one day.
    Finally no sunbathing … don’t we all sunbathe just long enough to dry.

    In general CIG is doing a fantastic job without doubt and the bad actions of the few are screwing us all.

    • Anonymous says:

      Just hang in 2 more weeks. It’s not fair, but life isn’t fair. At least your household was able to go out each day to shop if needed. My surname doesn’t get Sat at the beach, is that fair? Nope, but that’s how it works out sometimes.

      • Anonymous says:

        I bet it was ok when they could shop with the two surnames – that was great! Ugh! But now it don’t suite you. Can’t please them… we need these ungrateful people
        g o n e!

    • Anonymous says:

      I thought after Tuesday you can drive to an exercise location 7 days a week?

      • Anonymous says:

        Can drive today…

        • Anonymous says:

          Yep you can drive to exercise today. Just not on the beach.
          If you are climbing the walls, living as a couple, give a thought to the people who live alone who have had no physical human contact for 2 months.
          Think about it. There’s always someone worse off than you do try to find the positives.
          You can swim safely alone on any public beach. I have for the last decade. Swim parallel to the beach. Take a noodle or a life jacket or any kind of float. Don’t swim if there’s no one in shouting distance.
          PS – I’m a 70+ Caymanian in case any one is interested. My MLA has not delivered masks. No one has contacted me to see if I’m ok. No food baskets for the sheltered seniors here, like there have been in the U.K. I’m living on $1,000 a month. I’m not complaining. Just giving some perspective to some people who might try looking in the mirror and see if they see ‘entitled complainer’.

          • Anonymous says:

            8:58am from one proud Caymanian to another ‘I am so proud of you’ you are a true example of the way we were! God Bless. ❤️

  2. Anonymous says:

    I’m confused by some testing related comments made at the last briefing… when asked if employers can compel an employee to be tested Dr. Lee indicated that they could not and said it would constitute assault, he then walked that statement back a bit. Many questions later the Premier was asked if the MLA’s were going to be tested and he replied he couldn’t force them to be tested. On the face of it, this seems correct, nobody should be forced to do something, although it does seem like common sense should prevail and you should just submit to taking the test. But I find the message confusing… Is testing mandatory to get back to work or not? If so how do you manage testing 9000 construction workers and giving them their results in a timely fashion for the reopening on Tuesday?

    • Anonymous says:

      It is not mandatory. Unless construction workers plan to engage in kissing, hugging, licking equipment and hard surfaces, they have very little chance to get or spread the virus. Sun would kill it before the virus finds its next host.
      Wearing a mask while talking to each other would be beneficial. And those who do worry would wear masks without anyone telling them to wear it.
      But since it is not NOROVIRUS, touching surfaces, instruments and materials while in the open air is safe.

    • Anonymous says:

      Alden is going to piss off a whole bunch of hungry people in a few short hours. Stay tuned.

    • Anonymous says:

      100 percent correct if not tested they pose a hazard to healthy people on the job on private is different thing. Not only constuction workers should be tested but año employees going back to work think about store workers etc.

    • Anonymous says:

      Yet they require all sorts of tests to get a work permit.

  3. Anonymous says:

    Humanity has learned nothing from the pandemic. Right back to destroying what has not been destroyed pre-pandemic.

    We are the virus, COVID19 is Earth’s vaccine.

    • Anonymous says:

      Why don’t you go to Mars! When you give up your a/c, car and every other convenience that you think is destroying Earth then You can complain!

    • Anonymous says:

      God is just sending a message, DON’T EAT THE FRIGGIN BATS. 🦇🦇🦇🦇🦇

    • Just me. says:

      We know. We also know we are all here for just a short time so make the best of it. If it bothers you to partake of the world to survive then don’t. Each one of us is only responsible for our own choices. Make yours and let everyone else make thiers. This way we live our time in peace.

  4. Anonymous says:

    Can the Minister of finance explain how he proposes to balance the books this year. Tourism related revenue = zero. Reduced work permit revenue. Increase in social welfare and health related costs. Financial Services has historically only brought is a bit more than 50%. Will there be a new Cayman bond offering ?

    • Anonymous says:

      don’t ask akward questions… you either brave or stupid…

    • Anonymous says:

      Read the CIG financials… They got hell of cash! About 700 million and they holding it all and begging everyone else.

      What is going to happen.ia everyone is going. To clutch the purse strings harder and hold tighter bringing about a cycle.

      • Betty Greenlove says:

        Bringing another cycle? Tricycle, or bicycle? Lord, please send us some decent people at election time.

  5. Anonymous says:

    To a group of People what ever the Government do will not be RIGHT!

    • Anonymous says:

      Well to be fair they have a pretty good track record of a) not doing things right b) being pretty stubborn about continuing with policies or failing to tackle problems long after policy failure has become apparent c) treating questioning or criticism with hostility and hubris rather than simply addressing concerns – you better be brave or stupid to ask them certain questions! – and d) not dealing with politically sensitive or difficult problems. But other than that, doing a bang up job.

      • Thurston Conrad says:

        You have a good sense of reality, Mr. Anonymous 9:00 pm. However, your descriptive “pretty good track record” would be more accurate if you had used “crappy track record”.

        • Anonymous says:

          It’s all relative. We are all different. If you need everyone to have the same answers as you you will never find peace in your lifetime. But that is not your goal in life. Right?

  6. Anonymous says:

    1900 construction firms on this island? Jeez, someone’s having a laugh!

  7. Anonymous says:

    full support to letting them go back to work, but who thinks this is going to “lead economic recovery ” ???
    .
    who is going to buy all these fancy high end properties they are busy building, that locals (and majority of expats) can not afoord????

    • Anonymous says:

      I work in wealth management. Trust and believe these properties are sold before construction and the appetite to purchase has not waned.

      • Anonymous says:

        If the economy belly up, civil unrest begin!!! Then what???? you all will be the first to run!

        • Anonymous says:

          The soup kitchens are forming. Check the compass. Next will be tent cities.
          International headlines for Alden will be “once wealthy Island destroyed by over zealous lockdown. From flatten the curve to cure.”

          • Anonymous says:

            Stop. Just. Stop. Your fear mongering is not helpful so you aren’t part of any solution.

        • Anonymous says:

          To where, it’s crap everywhere. Despite what you might think some of us actually are committed here for the long run. And some are hoping to stay permanently so no where to run to.

      • Anonymous says:

        5:17, You do realise we are heading into a depression next year?

        • Anonymous says:

          I’m already depressed.
          Maybe just a recession.

          • Anonymous says:

            No. We are in a recession now. The depression is next year. Of course, so much depends on when we get a vaccine but certainly would not depend on Trump’s happy talk about a vaccine.

            Listen to the scientists and doctors not the real estate boy.

      • Anonymous says:

        It’s very early days Mr Wealth Manager! Projects are being delayed

    • Anonymous says:

      And those that aren’t sold off plan, will be peanuts when the property market crashes in 6/12 months.

    • Anonymous says:

      Pre sold off plan

    • Anonymous says:

      Don’t worry. Mr. Dart is already licking his lips.

    • Anonymous says:

      That tells you what kind of economic recovery is coming.

  8. Anonymous says:

    I’ve been in the hospitality industry for ten years since I got out of school. It’s the only job I’ve had. Where do I fit in construction?

    • Anonymous says:

      Laborer, canteen, accounts, apprentice carpenter, landscaper, painter, supplies, …

      • Anonymous says:

        Don’t you have to get some sort of re-training, learn basic construction skills?

        May be because you assume that anyone can do anything here, like your Ministers of Education& Agriculture and Health things are so shitty here?

        10 years experience in hospitality is (at least must be) valuable for the country and an achievement for the person.

        • Anonymous says:

          Are you caymanian?

        • Anonymous says:

          6:53am… no training necessary. After the mass status grant a large percent of that “treason mess”, were magically all contractors. Some had never held a hammer. Up to date it’s nothing but corruption – in some cases it’s just a “front”.

    • Anonymous says:

      Yeah, you might think about leaving, it’s going to be awhile.

    • Anonymous says:

      if you have to ask maybe you would be better suited to work civil service?

      • Anonymous says:

        Arrogant much? It’s a reasonable question.

        • Anonymous says:

          Not arrogant at all. Just a full career in construction. Not everyone can do it. Not everyone should try. It is hard dangerous work with great rewards.

    • Anonymous says:

      No where. Don’t be fooled, there are no construction jobs.

      • Anonymous says:

        That’s BS. I am about to employ a full team for a year on a major project. And clearly you haven’t seen all the works in progress – most of which will be back to speed in no time – contracts are signed and money is changing hands.

        • Anonymous says:

          lol…So because you have a project you figure the demand for construction workers will be so great that not only will the available labour be taken up but the industry will need to look to the hospitality sector for support labour?.. If this keeps up for much longer I say good luck to you and your project and every other project. I do admire your enthusiasm though.

          • Anonymous says:

            Sorry you’re having such a hard time of it, but there are construction jobs, enough of them to hire on some Caymanians who lost their jobs in hospitality if they’re willing to give it a go. The construction projects (and financial services activity) are definitely a key to keeping the economy going, if even at a turtle’s pace. You can roll over and die or try to be part of the solution to live. It won’t be easy or fun, but we can – and most will – get through this. Enthusiasm is contagious just like covid! The sooner you shift your mindset, the happier you will be. Trust me on this!

            • Anonymous says:

              Actually I have a job, have never missed a day. What I’m doing is being real. We cannot continue this way, or even close to this way. I know the construction business very well and it is dog eat dog even when we are in favorable conditions. We are following a deeply flawed strategy that will leave us right where we started less any savings or assets we’ve managed to squirrel away. At some point we will face the cruel world. The sooner the better and while I follow the rules and laws I will also be a constant reminder of the reality of the situation as I see it. If you think we can keep our borders closed until the world is free of this virus I would strongly disagree to put it politely. That is unless our population is prepared to sacrifice everything including some lives in order to claim “victory” over coronavirus.

        • Anon says:

          8.27 A full team of Caymanians? I bet not

    • Anonymous says:

      alden has a plan for you….but don’t get ur hopes up….it involves weekly food vouchers.

    • Philip says:

      if you have the work ethic to work for 10 years in hospitality , you should have no problem getting started in construction , just start at the bottom and work hard, show initiative , turn up on time and dont complain, if you do this you will be rewarded.

  9. Anonymous says:

    While I tend to understand the rationale for wanting to open the construction industry, I also want to point out that this will have a serious and detrimental impact on this countries progress on COVID19 suppression. Within weeks of this sector opening, there will be a dramatic spike in the cases that is being recorded. With the complexities of a work site, especially larger ones, it will be literally impossible to contain the spread of the virus on those sites due to the number of persons that will be present at any given time. If construction sites can open, then we might as well open the beaches, allow fishing and do away with the curfew. The opening of construction now, will be the fertilizer that COVID19 needs to spread like a wildfire throughout our small island nation. Please refocus on this option and give SERIOUS consideration to this plan that will be of dire consequences. As a small business owner in this field, I will feel the continued impact on my business too, as will others. However life is irreplaceable- a business and the economy can be rebuilt.

    • Anonymous says:

      Do your dreams tell you this? You may have been isolated a little too long. Calm down and relax. Just breath and let workers go back to work so they can have a life. It is probable that cases may rise. More persons who have it and are not sick. More that have it and get sick. and Maybe even one or two that go to the hospital. Maybe to die of a heart attack or cancer or car accident. In time all most all of them will be back to normal with little problems. Some day we will all die. Such is life.

      • Anonymous says:

        You started off well, but as to be expected flaked at the end.
        Having these workers go back to work will not only help the low income worker start earning again, but with their testing it will help us find those that are asymptomatic and put them into isolation so they cannot infect others and while they are in isolation and unable to infect others, the virus will burn itself out eventually if we can determine who carries it and isolate them we’ll be in great shape.

      • Anonymous says:

        If you really don’t care if you get sick, live or die…etc… then just open the borders and let tourists in. We can stay at your house.

      • Anonymous says:

        4:30, You don’t want to look at Texas today. They let workers go back to work a few weeks ago and now they have a dramatic increase in coronavirus cases. The scientists have it right. The new cases in Texas are a cause for concern.

        Don’t think it could not happen here.

    • Anonymous says:

      It’s not the large construction sites you have to worry about. It’s the small man with three to twelve guys building apartments or a house. They’re the ones with employees on these SHIC plans, no welfare facilities etc.
      what options or suggestions have you put forth to cig as “a small business owner in this field”?

  10. Anon says:

    It’s absolutely right that we get folk back to work (not just for economic reasons, people’s incomes, mental health). Likewise, that we do so thoughtfully and safety.

    However, as with much of what seems to be going forwards, there seems little joined up thinking. For an island that has both an unusually large amount of people with common sense and intellectual capital that such poor joined up thinking (I’m being kind) is being put into seemingly politically motivated action.

    Recently, the Premier indicated small contractors would be put to work after the big ones. Yet, the small ones are more locally owned and more likely to operate more safely.

    The larger ones have vested interests, make less use of local skills … and have even been offered limited Covid testing compared to smaller contractors. (The Premier said it, not me). This flies in the face of much of the Premier’s rhetoric.

    It seems to beggar belief that what a group of us could resolve in a bar quite effectively (for no pay), elected officials bumble about (paid handsomely to do so).

    • Anonymous says:

      I think he said the smaller ones would actually be easier to monitor yesterday so there’s hope.

    • Anonymous says:

      I’m sorry, which country have you been living in?

      Implying smaller construction companies are safer? If you say so. You sound bitter about a lot of things.

  11. Anonymous says:

    So if my house was in the middle of repairs I can finish that up? I’m not clear on the rules.

    • Anonymous says:

      Probably only if you’re doing it yourself, but who knows if your contractor applies and an gets an exemption then yes.

    • Anonymous says:

      And who is going to have the money to purchase all this new construction?

      • Anonymous says:

        There are super-wealthy people and they will ALWAYS have money. And those are the ones we need to target our tourism marketing dollar to moving forward.

      • Anonymous says:

        I would but I already did just before Covid

      • Anonymous says:

        Foreign investors that are buying them in the first place.

      • Anonymous says:

        My home. I live in. Needs the repairs finished from earthquake damage.

      • Anonymous says:

        Do not worry. Mr. Dart will buy them all! Just think…….. Someday we will be known as the Dart Islands.

  12. Anonymous says:

    What Will happen when projects reach a dead lock investors can’t longer comitt to there bank loans. Or other Money problem due to pandemic.
    Industrial ,commercial and residential constuction interesting to watch.
    Base on the numbers of expat & permit workers in that sector how much Money Will remain on island?
    Could be another out break waiting to happen.

    • Anonymous says:

      Property market will be fully back in 3 or 4 years. Just hang in there.

      • Anonymous says:

        Yep, I’d say you’re right on the timeline. High end, beachfront will likely bounce back sooner, probably 18 months. The other properties will require population growth to resume. When the traffic gets as bad as it was in February of this year, the real estate market will be completely back!

        • Anonymous says:

          Depends on the development of a vaccine. No vaccine, then no bounce back in 18 months.

  13. Anonymous says:

    I hope when there are 10,000 test (hopefully by the end of the month) he doesn’t change his tune to another figure.

    • Anonymous says:

      they will…the cat is out of the bag…. and its happening with many sgovernments worldwide.
      testing means nothing….eradication is impossible at this stage.
      the lockdown has failed and must now be lifted…

      • Anonymous says:

        You all just make stuff up as you go along, don’t you?

        Everything you just said is wrong.

      • Anonymous says:

        Absolute nonsense. Look at Germany, New Zealand, Korea, Taiwan, Washington State in U.S. and British Columbia in Canada.

        The models are there and we can do it on our dinky island.

        TESTING AND TRACING MEANS SOMETHING BOBO.

  14. Anonymous says:

    How is testing construction workers and putting them back to work a priority over testing helpers and getting them back to work? 5,000 helpers vs how many construction workers?

  15. Anonymous says:

    It will be interesting to see how many of the construction companies go back to work on existing projects. They’re short on cash in the best of times. If investors decide to hold off and see what happens, you will see many abandoned projects for quite some time.

    • Anonymous says:

      Scary times

    • Anonymous says:

      Dart isn’t short of cash now or ever. Investors like that kind of security.

    • Anonymous says:

      How about the concession-gifted Billionaire with front-of-the-line government access, that haven’t bothered to honour their NRA Agreement from 2016? They haven’t remediated or torn down or fixed the old Hyatt? All the money and staff, yet, derelict land packages all over three islands. What’s their excuse?

    • Anonymous says:

      Hope so

    • Anonymous says:

      9:39am — a lot of these are not what we think! Big money…. may be laundering?????

      • Anonymous says:

        More likely the 1,000’s of churches are laundering with all the cash they purportedly collect.

  16. Queenie Ebanks says:

    How is keeping foreign workers employed and putting money into developers pockets going to lead our way out of this?

    Whoever wrote and approved this has no common sense or education.

    • Anonymous says:

      Um, Queenie…. I can’t help you if you can’t help yourself.

    • Anonymous says:

      I bet you would look good in a hardhat boo

    • Anonymous says:

      Queenie perhaps your just bitter that it’s as you call it “ Foreign Workers “ I hope your not one of these people who thinks they are the only race that belong here. – Sounds like racism !

      • Anonymous says:

        There is only one people that belongs here. They are called Caymanians. Have a little respect. Your projected accusation of racism only casts similar aspersions on you.

  17. Anon says:

    Construction of what and for who?

    • Anonymous says:

      Friends and family first. Then local voters. Then friends of local voters and family. Then Bush’s friends and family. Then some day everyone else. The usual.

  18. Anonymous says:

    This is why they were no flights to Jamaica. If them construction workers/garderners/barbers/cashers leave then we screwed. Yes I said it and Im a Caymanian. Cause i know one thing no Caymanian not going to do these low income jobs. Unemployed or not. So thank god god for them.

  19. Anonymous says:

    So they expect the construction industry to pick up all the unemployed? All I am hearing now is that permits are being turned down for no reason. Gov tellIng companies who to hire.

    • Anonymous says:

      Permits are not being turned down for no reason. They are being turned down for excellent reason. There are hundreds of unemployed Caymanians and Permanent Residents who can do the jobs.

    • Caymanite says:

      There are many Caymanian Masons, Electricians, Carpenters etc. that can’t get a Construction job because companies owned by foreigners will only hire Jamaicans etc. as they will work for less, undercut others & take side jobs illegally. Permits need to be turned down in many cases especially the ones taken out by the new Caymanians who abuse the system.

      • Anonymous says:

        I think you will find most construction companies are owned by Caymanians.

      • Anonymous says:

        Then maybe the workers should work for less if they don’t have another option? Government can’t tell a company how much to pay someone.

        • Anonymous says:

          They SHOULD. I’ve already heard that prices will have to go UP to make up for lost revenue in many sectors of the economy…WTF??? What model are they following??? Best to break even and keep your business open for the immediate short term, and let the greedy ones fold due to lack of business so you have less competition. Think about it. I may have just saved your business if you think you’re so special that you should increase your prices.

      • Robert Mugabe IV says:

        Oh my! Where to start.
        99% of construction companies are owned by your fellow countrymen/women. In other words..Caymanians.
        Why don’t you go and ask them why they hire ‘foreigners’. Don’t blame the ‘foreigners’, blame your fellow Caymanians.
        Good day to you Sir/Madam.

      • Anonymous says:

        This is not true at all. There are few if any qualified licensed Caymanian trades people. How could there be? Trade schools don’t even exist here… there is a reason companies pay for work perrmits

        • Anonymous says:

          No – nothing to do with trade school. Most of these trades are learned by way of apprenticeship on the job. That immigration has refused to enforce the laws as to apprenticeship is the problem, not the lack of trade schools.

  20. Anonymous says:

    This headline demonstrates the total absence of a smart policy decisions at the upper levels of the government. We (the world) are in this position now because of the destruction of natural habitat and human encroachment on the few remaining biodiverse areas. The majority of jobs in the construction industry are low paying and filled by permit holders whilst the developers and major construction firms reap windfalls. We all remember the army of Mexicans flown in to build the Ritz. Instead of government seizing an opportunity to reset how the economy is managed it immediately goes back to business as usual. Developers have long held far too much influence over the direction of important matters that impact the daily lives of everyone here, by becoming even more beholden to them the government is failing in its most basic of duties. When that grotesque new Hyatt is built who will bear the brunt of the congestion?

    • Tamara Worboys says:

      The Premier is taking short term vote winning measures.

      If the expats that he seems to dislike so much are not here, who is going to buy the over priced condos being built?

      All that will happen is an affluent few with cash on the bank will pick up a cheap deal.

      Utter nonsense.

      • Anonymous says:

        I don’t think it will be cheap. They will hold out cause they’re rich enough to do that.

    • Anonymous says:

      The best comment.

  21. Anonymous says:

    Lead recovery? Interesting more likely you got buyers half of whom can’t take possession, developer with money in the ground and contracts in balance underwriters at banks shocked and worried! Just today the federal reserve put the odds of depression at 50/50.

    Construction is a type of investment and so I say with a huge piece of our economy gone this byproduct industry is dead in water.

    Govt is not being rational about corona it just recognises that in 4 months all the projects will be dead and they’ll be left with a bunch of abandoned construction sites. So this is what they call in the industry just about getting sites finished or weather proofed to be sit idle like John Gray High School

    • Anonymous says:

      It’s not lead the recovery so much as mitigate the damage. This way expat construction workers get paid ( for a few months anyway) and are not a burden on the NAU, and the local developers can complete projects and harvest the remaining progress payments on pre sold projects and avoid losing performance bonds. Others to get the part finished buildings weathertight and hope for a recovery of the sales market in due course. But the concept it’s going to lead the recovery is a joke unless they can explain where the demand is going to be for fresh projects.

  22. Anonymous says:

    construction is important…but it is also hugely sensitive to economic condtions.
    as the recession/depression hits…construction will fall away.
    cayman faces economic oblivion unless top international economic advisors are brought in…. still-no-plan-alden and do-nothing-ppm will lead cayman into bankruptcy again.

  23. Anonymous says:

    CNS is clearing land for construction allowed right now? Coz its happening so I just wondered.

    CNS: No, it is not allowed right now.

    • Anonymous says:

      And even when it is allowed, it requires planning permission.

    • Anonymous says:

      If it is ‘landscaping’ they would probably get away with it….

      • Anonymous says:

        They’re clearing land not landscaping it. Big difference.

        • Anonymous says:

          Not if your definition of landscaping is removing low brush and scrub and turning it into a cleared lot and that lot might be developed but for now you are just going to do the ground works and basic fencing and landscaping. Fine line but easily argued….

    • Anonymous says:

      Thanks CNS. I ask because I keep seeing several trucks going in and out of Northward Rd. going in empty, coming out loaded with bush, especially yday. Some of those trucks so noisy as they turn in and out, can’t help but notice.

      • Anonymous says:

        Ah, but the police seemingly don’t notice, even though what you report is by the prison.

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