Cops bust West Bay dealer

| 18/02/2020 | 44 Comments
Cayman News Service
Drugs and drug utensils seized 14 February 2020

(CNS): Three West Bay men, aged 28, 41 and 64, were arrested Friday night after a drug bust at three locations in the district, one of whom was arrested for dealing. Police, assisted by officers from the Department of Agriculture, conducted the searches under the Misuse of Drugs Law. They recovered CI$4,000 in cash, believed to be the proceeds of dealing, an undisclosed quantity of ganja and cocaine, as well as drug utensils.

The three men were arrested in two different places and while all of them were arrested on suspicion of drug related offences, only one has been charged with intent to supply.

The 41-year-old man was arrested on suspicion of possession of ganja with intent to supply and possession of cocaine with intent to supply. The two other men were both arrested for consumption of ganja.

They are all now on police bail as investigations continue.

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Category: Crime, Police

Comments (44)

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  1. Anonymous says:

    The parishes of St Catherine, Clarendon, Hanover, St James and Westmoreland are under states of public emergency as well as the police divisions of Kingston Eastern and St Andrew South. There were 5 murders in the SOEs just in the last 24hrs. Decriminalizing personal cannabis limits, handing out grower licenses, doesn’t remove inter gang violence and criminal motivation for absolute domination and control. Canada is learning this lesson too with southwest Ontario one of the fastest growth crystal meth markets anywhere. Criminals are unaffected by changes in laws (which only govern those that would adhere to them), and they remain to continue illicit activity and defend market share built over decades.

  2. Anonymous says:

    You shouldn’t take anti depressants and drink alcohol.
    But we do it any ways and it’s very popular in Cayman.

    Extremely Physically and Mentally Dangerous.

    Should legalize and take the money away from the criminals that’s how you stop them.
    You can’t stop a plant, thats like trying to stop trees from growing.

    Rejoice in the harmony of plants and mother nature, respect them.

    Caymanian Adult, 30

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  3. Anonymous says:

    Seems the people who have never tried pot are the ones who have the biggest opinion on it. I have used it for 40 years. It works for me. Its not for everyone. Don’t like it? Don’t smoke it. Its illegal because of ignorance only.

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    • Anonymous says:

      It’s illegal. Period. In the Cayman Islands, it’s a schedule A substance smuggled-in with guns, ammo, other drugs, and hardened criminals/killers. I have a problem with people that don’t understand the blood on their hands, their complicity in that equation, dismiss it as “not a big deal”, or think their active participation is not a wider problem for society. It is.

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      • Anonymous says:

        You probably didn’t read this comment below:

        “If locals can grow their own weed/medicine here, there’s no need to pay Jamaican smugglers to bring it over, along with GUNS, cocaine, and anything else.

        The cash cow is the weed.. Without it, the risk becomes less rewarding.”

        It’s been proven to be safer than alcohol. Why allow one and not the other?

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      • Anonymous says:

        Dont leave out the rum u love was once smuggle with those things also

  4. Moi says:

    Good grief. Surely that is nothing to brag about. Quite pathetic really when you think of the crime statistics. Patting themselves on the back with a minor ganja arrest.

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  5. Anonymous says:

    What an accomplishment by the RCIPs………It makes you wonder though why they don’t bust more often given we are a small village and everyone knows who / where the dealers are, including the police as they have been the sample “Dons” since 19’how long?

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  6. Anonymous says:

    This is a minor, window-dressing bust to try to paper us off the upcoming CFATF criticism. Why aren’t the major gang leaders ever being engaged? What is the agreement? Who from CIG is involved in the “hands off” transshipment industry?

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  7. Anonymous says:

    With this government we need those drugs more now than ever.

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  8. Anonymous says:

    I’m all for relaxation guys but really? Half of you don’t know what you are doing now without consuming drugs!! Haven’t you got the intelligence to function with a clear head?? Why put poison into your body? You may think Ganga is a harmless way of “relaxation” but it leads to much more addictive lethal drugs. I can think of much better ways to relax without putting myself and my loved ones at risk. Drugs have caused so much loss of life and total misery to your loved ones. Get a grip!

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    • Anonymous says:

      I guess I’ll just stick to alcohol. That is socially acceptable for some reason. I’m not allowed to smoke weed but I can go to the store and purchase gallons of alcohol and consume it, destroy my body and put other people’s life in danger. I can do all of that, but I’m not allowed to roll one in my house and chill, enjoy some food and relax.

      Thanks.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Alcohol concentrations are printed on the label, easier to understand with predictable affect and known provenance. Not so with blood-stained illicit drugs and the criminal networks they support.

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        • Anonymous says:

          If it were legal, the drug lords wouldn’t continue to profit as they have for decades as locals could grow it themselves and ensure no harmful additives such as pesticides are used. This would harm their cashflow / criminal networks!

          I’ve been buying imported Jamaican weed in Cayman since the 80s. Nothing has changed, and it continues to be sold illegally in every district. Busts just mean prices go up and profit margins increase for those with stock.

          Legalize personal growing and use to kill the cash cow. I grew my own and stopped buying for a few years in the 90s but sold that land.

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          • Anonymous says:

            Illegal weed production and consumption have doubled or tripled in Canada since decriminalization, at half the price. The crooks don’t just roll over the next day and surrender their market share. Not when they can suddenly access the legitimate payments system across all product lines. The legal producers (those that haven’t gone bust) are sitting on years of supply, and the gov’t are going to have to have start promoting weed consumption, which is 180’ from the “corruption of youth” thesis used as support the decriminalization! The irony.

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            • Anonymous says:

              Comparing Apples to Oranges and missing the point here. This na Canada boh.

              If locals can grow weed here, there’s no need to pay Jamaican smugglers to bring it over, along with GUNS, cocaine, and anything else.

              The cash cow is the weed.. Without it, the risk becomes less rewarding.

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            • Anonymous says:

              Illegal weed production and consumption have doubled or tripled in Canada since decriminalization?

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          • Anonymous says:

            I have no doubt your dealer assures you there are no pesticides. Take it to a lab and test for Myclobutanil/Eagle 20 and diesel. You’ll probably find both, as well as other known carcinogens that activate when heated beyond 200’C. Jamaica’s Cannabis Licensing Authority (CLA) is trying to establish standards for the 22 licensed growers. Up until now, whatever has been cheapest to knock down the pest insects has been what has been used. That includes diesel fuel hand pumped from small drum. Or you can believe the all-natural stories of your honest drug dealer (that would never lie to you, a time-honored customer).

    • Anonymous says:

      If it wasn’t for me starting to smoke weed in university I would’ve jumped off a parking garage from the stress. I got over my depression, pulled myself together and graduated with honors. I now have a great job.

      Do I still smoke weed? I roll one up after stressful days.
      Does my boss know I do? Told them myself.
      Do I show up to work sober every day and get my work done? Damn right.
      Has it turned me into a failure and crackhead? Nope.

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      • Blacklisted says:

        The people against marijuana are usually ones who have never tried it, and have heard “horror stories” about it from other people who haven’t tried it. Not saying it’s for everyone, but still.

        I have a similar story to yours; anxiety, depression, the works. Started smoking once nightly before bed and it gave my mind a chance to slow down and make calculated decisions, rather than impulsive ones based on emotion, (minus the laundry list of side effects that come with normal antidepressants and no chance of OD). Even cut out drinking altogether (albeit I didn’t drink much to begin with).

        Within months I figured out the root of a lot of my issues and actually worked toward resolving them. Realizing that weed really only makes you more of who you are already. If you’re lazy, don’t blame the smoking, make changes with your life and be more productive. Constant bad relationships? Figure out that maybe you’re the problem sometimes. Just examples.

        No calories, no hangover. Everything in moderation.

        Free up the plant so we can relax and lock up our government for stressing us out in the first place with their shadiness & criminality.

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  9. Anonymous says:

    Ganja needs to continue to be illegal because far too many people have used it as a gateway drug. Bad news bears!

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    • Anonymous says:

      As a ganja smoker of 30 years I can attest that the only thing that ganja is a gateway to is the refrigerator.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Weed is less addictive that the alcohol people love to pour down their throats and lose control. I think people like to point to this “gateway” term as if they have some type of concrete evidence to prove this. While my experiences are anecdotal, I myself and other around me have never once had the desire to try other drugs after ganja. It was ganja that led to me not wanting to.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Those that choose to consume taboo illicit recreational drugs generally don’t have big hangups on doing other criminal shit thereafter. For some, it’s their first act of defiance against innocence and it feels exciting, and usually is a lot of fun. In that respect, it’s a gateway social activity, usually teens, surrounded by people they trust or aspire to be like. Crackheads don’t just wake up one day and say, I’m gonna get me some crack, they started with weed and other feel good stuff, and someone said “try this”. It doesn’t necessarily mean that all people who smoke weed will be doing meth and bath salts, but some will, and those likely got on this path with ganja.

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        • Anonymous says:

          Ever considered that if we could grow the natural, medical, god given plant ourselves instead of buying it from someone who also imports crack, there would be no “gateway” to opportunities for teens to purchase said crack and other drugs that the dealer may be selling???

          Nicotine is 1000x more addictive than weed yet you don’t call that a gateway drug do ya? Why? Because it’s behind a regulated counter.

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    • Anonymous says:

      And what about alcohol?

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    • Anonymous says:

      While we are at it can we strike off the voter roll persons who are know ganja smokers before the next election? Also drunks too!

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      • Anonymous says:

        > also drunks too

        Wellp, there goes half of the voter registry.

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      • Anonymous says:

        So are we going to kick em outta working at the courts judges and lawyers alike, in the government leaders and all, the police, fire, customs, banks, supermarkets and all the other offices that they work in? You really want the unemployment in Cayman to double over night? Permit holders would drop by 90%, there goes the governments main source of income. How ignorant are you really?

        • Anonymous says:

          I’d rather live among 10,000 sober Christians than 75,000 gussied up voters, expats, lawyers, judges, etc.

    • SSM345 says:

      10.21, ganja is not a gateway drug, the already legal ones are; cigarettes, alcohol, prescribed opiates, the list goes on…..

      Can I borrow your copy of Reefer Madness?

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  10. Anonymous says:

    You can purchase alcohol 7 days a week, almost overdose on a Sunday night and throw up Monday morning before work. Can’t believe these backward islands still forbid you to roll up a lil spliff after work to relax instead of drinking a toxic liquid. Even allowed to smoke tobacco on government compounds!

    “you shouldn’t need weed to relax” – I see ya there, one who drinks coffee at 3pm.

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  11. Anonymous says:

    Just legalize ganja! Cayman could become like California or Canada, they export marijuana products and oil. We’d make some good money in that business!

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    • Anonymous says:

      Unfortunately the Caymanians won’t be able to compete with the big companies if it is legalized. It’s the poor people that are suffering and have no other means but to peddle the marajuana at the street corners.

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  12. Elvis says:

    Consumption of ganja? Wow what a bust, should at least get a 150 ci fine for dat

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  13. Blacklisted says:

    Why aren’t we trying to push forward with decriminalizing marijuana?

    Oh wait… CIG…

    Nevermind…

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