Data protection finally implemented

| 01/10/2019 | 7 Comments
Cayman News Service

(CNS): After some ten years of discussions and drafting, the Data Protection Law (DPL), which was passed in the Legislation Assembly in 2017, has finally come into force. The law, which is modeled on data protection legislation in the European Union, was implemented on Monday. It is centred around eight data protection principles regarding the use of personal information by businesses, organisations and public authorities.

As well as protecting data and preventing abuse of personal information, it grants rights to individuals in relation to their data. The law places obligations on data controllers, including a duty to inform individuals how their data is being used, ensure that data is accurate and relevant to the purpose for which it is used, and is retained only for as long as necessary. Data controllers are also required to notify the Ombudsman, whose office will oversee the law, and the affected individuals of serious data breaches.

Building on the fundamental right to private and family life in the Cayman Islands Bill of Rights, the DPL grants individuals a number of important rights, such as the right to request access to their data, ask for rectification of inaccurate data and stop direct marketing.

The Office of the Ombudsman is tasked with oversight and enforcement, and individuals have the right to complain to the Ombudsman if they believe their data is not being processed in accordance with the new law.

For information and guidance on the law visit the Office of the Ombudsman website


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Category: Government oversight, Local News, Politics, Private Sector Oversight

Comments (7)

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  1. Anonymous says:

    Good news is that a person can now write to the Immigration Dept and request copies of their personal data on file at the Immigration Dept.

  2. Anonymous says:

    As usual the private sector will look to the civil service to lead the way. Finally we have a law that applies to both private and public sector. Now the private sector will get a taste of what the civil service deals with every day with FOI.

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  3. Anonymous says:

    But will it be enforced? In the UK the ICO would have a field day with Digicel’s abuse and marketing of our information without our consent. They would slap on a HUGE fine.

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    • Anonymous says:

      No it’s like FOI – all front and nothing behind it. This is going to be a round of, ‘Look how open we are now,’ while in the background they’ll be slamming the door on it.

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  4. Anonymous says:

    Does this mean I won’t have to provide my date of birth and marital status every single time I do anything at the bank? Or my telephone number when I buy something from AL Thompson’s? Or my email address to log onto free wifi? Probably not.

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