Jamaica PM wants to grow trade with Cayman

| 08/07/2019 | 75 Comments
Cayman News Service
Jamaica Prime Minister Andrew Holness in Grand Cayman for the celebrations

(CNS: Jamaica Prime Minister Andrew Holness said during his recent visit here for the 60th anniversary of the Cayman Islands Constitution that he hopes to see more trade between his country and Cayman. Speaking at one of several events he attended, he said he had engaged in bilateral talks with Premier Alden McLaughlin to see how the trading relationship could improve and to remove stumbling blocks such as the visa requirements.

“I think that there should be talks on this matter as the Jamaican economy improves, as we are finding labour for our people,” he said. “The relationship between our two countries will slowly be redefined to the point where a visa may not even be necessary. That’s the objective; that’s what we want to do.” 

With Jamaica experiencing an unprecedented level of economic activity, with 17 consecutive quarters of growth, Holness said that it was time for Jamaica to be reaching out and having its trade deals with its neighbours. “Stronger trade with Jamaica and Cayman is now quite possible and necessary,” he said.

Holness also asked Jamaicans living here to invest in Jamaica as the future of the country’s economy is promising: “The only way forward now is up, and I feel the confidence in the economy,” he told the diaspora.

He accepted that things were still challenging, however, and that despite having the best performing stock market in the world for the last two years, Jamaica still faced difficulties such as crime and global climate change. Holness said that the country has one of the highest murder rates in the world, but the crime was fuelled by poverty and is beginning to fall as the economy improves.

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Category: Business

Comments (75)

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  1. Anonymous says:

    Wee Already doin trade with jamaica…
    We gets our weed from there🙊🙈😂😂

  2. Anonymous says:

    Jamaica is so riddled with dishonest Lodge type people. Unfortunately, our dishonest politicians who are 99% Lodge aspire to be like their counterparts in Jam. The only thing holding this place back from total corruption can only be the hand of God Himself because if it were possible, we would be an urban slum already.
    I am just looking for a Caymanian politician to walk openly and transparently before God and the people.
    No, I am not talking about Julianna. She has feathered her nest and bowed to the Lodge. Her testimony is irrelevant, null and void.

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  3. Anonymous says:

    No thanks, Keep the Visa in place. I would rather pay $500.00 for a visa than have travel to and from Jam. as it previously was, a free for all. Not a wise decision to remove the visa requirement, if everything is taken into consideration.

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  4. Anthony says:

    I am neither JLP nor PNP but regarding growth of a country the people must be benefitted, create jobs, fix the dollars at one rate, and open factories to run good production lines hence major problems solved. Jamaicans as suffered for years now borrowing money, increasing debts on the people that must come to an end, invest the money and pay your debt from your interest, find work give the people then we’ll be a great nation.

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  5. Anonymous says:

    Just send the Ganja

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  6. Anonymous says:

    Jamaicans are very proud so we will not directly tell you how we feel. But I am going to tell you, and that is that the visa restrictions imposed by the UK and by Cayman, those two countries, cut Jamaicans to the core. That hurt Jamaicans on a deeply personal level.

    We will never give up the Queen, the Commonwealth or the Privy Council because England is still the Mother Country to us. I am not joking. And Cayman was like a little brother or sister. So nowadays Jamaican kids cannot tell you where Cayman is on a map but anyone older than 30 feels betrayed by those visa restrictions.

    The USA will always be our friend because we feel like they treat us as equals in a sense and we were never colonized by the USA. I myself love Americans and think they are great people generally. But England is the mother country and it betrayed us. Hence we will forever ask that those visa restrictions be removed.

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    • Anonymous says:

      A delusional rant at best, strange musings from a citizen of a country that went independent still pledging allegiance to the English crown.

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    • Anonymous345 says:

      The UK and Cayman has offended you by imposing visa restrictions, but what about “Uncle Sam” (U.S.A.) that you love so much, don’t they too impose a visa requirement for your country men?

      And do tell me why your Prime Minister Mr.Andrew Holness has not given thought to approaching President Donald J.Trump to lift that visa requirement for Jamaican nationals as I’m sure this too is a stumbling block.

      Further, your island nation chose independence and I really believe you feel betrayed by the Cayman Islands because we didn’t join hands with you ‘Big Sister’ when YOU decided to vacate mother’s house and become independent.

      Don’t begrudge Cayman because of your country’s mess and mistakes.

      Cayman owns the solemn right to protect its borders and vet each individual from your nation who wants to set foot for a visit or to legally remain here and there’s nothing personal about that, just absolute sensibility by part of our government.

      • Anonymous says:

        I am telling you why Jamaicans are angry about the visa restrictions. I personally don’t care. However I do care about having a USA visa.

        The Americans have been more loyal to us since Independence than anyone else except Venezuela and Cuba. Andrew Holness is very smart. We reap tremendous benefits from the USA and are not ungrateful. Yes there is a visa but thousands of Jamaicans receive them, quite easily, every year. You may not believe this, but most Jamaicans are law abiding and have no desire to mess up anybody else’s country.

        The difference between an American and an Englishman (to me) is that the American is totally blunt and honest. They stab you right in the front. If they are racist or whatevr-ist they really don’t pretend otherwise. They are also motivated by money and fame. So they are easy to understand.

        So please tell me what motivates an English person or a Caymanian. It’s a mystery. Their intense snobbery and religiousness based on absolutely nothing is unbearable.

        Here is an example. I have never seen so much cocaine use as I did in socializing with people from the UK who were my age. Young Jamaicans are not exposed to this drug and could also never afford it! These people also never had more than one “friend” of “colour.” Would they ever say hey I love drugs and I hate black people? Nope.

        Another example, the Windrush generation!!

  7. Anonymous says:

    In response to 7:02 pm. I am a born Caymanian but have citizenship to other countries and trust me when I tell you its not just Caymanians that have issues with Jamaicans. Both countries I lived in previously did not want Jamaicans there. I know it is unfair to paint all Jamaicans with the same brush but the crime rate increased where Jamaicans presided and that is the main reason Jamaicans are not welcomed in most countries. I witnessed this in Cayman after 2003. Presently travelers are being warned about travelling to JA. Need I say more?

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  8. Anonymous says:

    I look forward to increased trade and think we can benefit from it…

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  9. Anonymous says:

    11:27 pm, you are 100 % right

  10. Anonymous says:

    Definitely keep the Visa in place, and also put back the Visa for Jamaican under 15 and over 70 years of age, unless Jamaica make it that Caymanians under 15 and over 70 don’t need a Visa to go to Jamaica. Mr Premier did you forget the Caymanians was the ones that voted you in, and prove it was not the fool, fools Caymanians

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  11. Anonymous says:

    Some serious racist abuse going on here! Must be those churches y’all go to. You know the “throw the first stone” crowd…you are so quick to point fingers and blame everything on Jamaicans without clearing your own back yard first. I personally have also worked with some very clever and smart Jamaican ladies in various office.

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  12. Anonymous says:

    How about jointly stopping the drug trade?

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    • Anonymous says:

      But then how will the corrupted law enforcement get their black market cut? Much more lucrative than a legal business that has to pay taxes.

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  13. Anon says:

    What a tragedy it will be if we continue trading from the U.S. and then something happens to us whereby we will have to rely on our neighbors.

    Cayman, it is not right to skip countries like Honduras, Jamaica, and Belize. I believe the fruit coming from these countries are way better, less pest free from the U.S. brand.

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    • kbb says:

      100% Agree!

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    • Anonymous says:

      Central and South America are not allowed to trade directly with us. If they do so they will have problems as most of their exporters have contracts to ship to USA Co’s only who then re-distribute to countries around the world.

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    • Anonymous says:

      I think Caymanians and everyone who owns a little piece of paradise should seriously try to be as self sufficient as possible by planting something for themselves. It is not difficult. Jamaica used to be a beautiful place to live or visit before crime took over. Caymanians and residents alike should by now realise that we are on a very dangerous slope of becoming a replica. Do not just criticize, do something before it is too late. Increasing trade with jamaica might sound great, but it also means more scrutinity and vigilance because vet all should realise that a Jamaican and a disloyal Caymanian will use the system for their own advantage even more than is being done now. Mr. Holiness is hoping to get crime under control; I am hoping the same for Cayman but it takes more than hope. ” hope needs action”

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      • Anonymous says:

        Well sad 7:03. We’ve become a society of repeaters and whiners. Maybe we need another era of the “southwell years” to toughen us up as Caymanians. What is displayed by our society today is not reflected in the history of our fore-bearers.

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  14. Anonymous says:

    I thought we already had a trade deal with them. They have been importing criminals since 2003.

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  15. Anonymous says:

    When it was found that Kamala Harris was Jamaican she lost all credibility of being president.

    We need to leave the Jams alone to figure out their problems and to keep their problems at a distance from Cayman success. Its like the long lost relative showing up at your house looking for food and shelter and we all know will stink of fish in three days after they have stolen your hearth and home.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Get your facts right 8:51. Kamala Harris was born in America of a Jamaican father and mother from India. She has never lived in nor has she ever held Jamaican or Indian citizenship. So she is not Jamaican.

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      • Anonymous says:

        YUP! My children are born from parents from 2 different parts of the world but they are Caymanian because this is where they were born and will grow up.

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      • Anonymous says:

        With one Jamaican parent she is automatically entitled to Jamaican citizenship. Makes her pretty Jamaican to me. She can be both a US national and Jamaican. You would be better arguing with the OP as to their outrageous suggestion that all Jamaicans are thieves than trying to deny that Harris is Jamaican. Of course, by that measure – place of birth – a lot of Caymanians would be deemed to be Jamaican as well – which given the general prejudice against them may explain why you are so sensitive to the point

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        • Anonymous says:

          Being entitled to citizenship and taking out citizenship are 2 different things. She cannot be an American President and also be the citizen of another country. She has never taken out Jamaican or Indian citizenship.

          She is also entitled to take out Indian citizenship too.

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        • Anonymous says:

          Guess you think Barack Obama was Kenyan too because his father was from there.

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          • Anonymous says:

            Nobody knows who Barak Obama’s father is except his father.

            CNS: Everyone knows who Barak Obama’s father is. As far as I can remember, even followers of the lunatic birther nonsense did not dispute his father’s identity.

      • Anonymous says:

        She was an anchor-baby? Then she really has no chance.

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      • Anonymous says:

        You fools she has nothing to do about Cayman, at least for now, so print something thats effects Cayman thats makes sense ok.

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    • Anonymous says:

      On a side note, being a true corrupt politician, Kamala will probably silently flaunt her “jamaician and indian roots” to gain the immigrant descent populations vote, all while remaining true the the american agenda in the end. After all that is what she is, an american.

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    • Anonymous says:

      As a Jamaican I have always wondered why Caymanians hate Jamaicans so much. I think it is because when Cayman was a dependency of Jamaica, Jamaicans treated Caymanians very badly. That is history, but many Caymanians have not forgotten. The hatred of people with black skin is also inherited from Jamaica. So it’s a very sad state of affairs but I am very proud to be Jamaican, and very sorry that we inspire hatred in so many other people. The sins committed in the past can’t be undone.

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      • Anonymous says:

        7:02 pm, the reason is Jamacans are too pushy, most of them don’t want to wait in line at the shops, Airport and especially at the Hospital, Pharmacy etc., running off their mouth complaining about this and that,they in general don’t have any manners. The educated Jamaicans are different, they are nice people. So they there are a lot of different , So its the ones that don’t have any manners, pushy and loudly complaining, are the ones Caymanins don’t like.

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      • Anonymous says:

        7:02 PM, Many Jamaicans are the most aggressive, pushy, loud mouth, complainers, won’t stand in line people. That’s why Caymanians dislike those like that, but the other Jamaicans that’s nice people, Cayman loves them .The color of the skin has nothing to do with it, for in this world its bad and good people of all color skin.

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      • Anonymous says:

        We don’t hate Jamaicans, my father is a Jamaican but let’s face facts. There are good and bad in any society but Jamaicans have developed a reputation worldwide that is quite negative and it’s not just a conspiracy theory. I can think of a lot of good that Jamaicans have done here in Cayman but equally there has been some very negative things as well and unfortunately I have witnessed enough to maintain my position that we cannot ease up on visa requirements, the bad continues to outweigh the good

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      • Anonymous says:

        Cayman was never a dependency of Jamaica. Jamaica and Cayman were both colonies, and Cayman was administered by the British, from Jamaica.

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      • Anonymous says:

        You’re the ones who come into our country hating on Caymanians and white people. This isn’t about the sins committed in the past. This is current.

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  16. Anonymous says:

    I’m presently trying to arrange the purchase of some building products from a company in Jamaica. It took a while just to get a quotation. Hope things get better.

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  17. Anonymous says:

    beginning of end….people vote ppm and udp out……start a cleam slate!!!😣

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  18. Anonymous says:

    Ha! Remember the trade talks with Honduras ? That went far! Smh Alden is a joke

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  19. Anonymous says:

    What does Jamaica have to offer us ? We should not be thinking about trading labour or jobs for food with a country that is the murder capital of the region, we have enough corrupt policemen, prison officers, here not to mention the bad driving workers, the criminals operating at local bars and involved in bringing in drugs and carrying out stolen goods. We need to enhance our travel restrictions because they are destroying our country. Take a drive across blue marlin on a Saturday evening! It’s Little Kingston all the way down to Champion house. You can get anything you want, women, illegal drugs,numbers, stolen property you name it.

    All of those problems for a few mangoes and sugar cane? No thanks Mr Andrew we good over here, keep your visa restrictions in place we will manage.

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  20. Anonymous345 says:

    The Visa requirement for Jamaican nationals is a must have and by no means a stumbling block as humorously declared by Jamaican Prime Minister Andrew Holness.

    Let us remember that Jamaica in the year 2005 had the highest murder rate in the world and sad to say but true; many Jamaicans who commit crimes in other countries are deported back to Jamaica on an annual basis.

    Crime on Jamaican shores is a problem that Prime Minister Andrew Holness and others before him cannot fix.

    Look at the recent crimes in the last 5 years on Cayman shores involving machete attacks against women, namely the murder-suicide in Bodden Town and the recent domestic assault in West Bay where the attacker apparently took his own life after stabbing a woman and innocent children.

    I’m all too pleased to hear that Jamaica’s economy is improving. Just honestly concerned about the sensitive chip the Jamaican government bares for Cayman’s decision to impose a Visa requirement for their citizens.

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  21. Anonymous says:

    The only thing I can think that he means is putting up his flag in front of the Immigration.

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  22. Anonymous says:

    Why do Caymanians still face visa restrictions traveling to Jamaica – including the young and old?

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  23. Anonymous says:

    Lodge facing Lodge, what’s to dislike?

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  24. Anonymous says:

    This makes sense. Cayman seems to buy the majority of its goods from the U.S. and import them from there. Trade with countries geographically closer to us needs to increase. Jamaica could seek to facilitate that for the Caribbean region… they’re in a good central location for shipping!

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  25. Anonymous says:

    He wants to grow what? We don’t have rope to trade anymore🙄

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  26. Anonymous says:

    Let’s trade medical grade Cannabis and be regional tourism hubs like California, Amsterdam and Denver.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Interesting how people who still support the waste of money 1960s War on Cannabis have nothing to argue with besides “it smells like tobacco” and a downvote button.

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  27. Anonymous says:

    More ganja?

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  28. Anonymous says:

    Our so called premier made it for Jamaicans coming to Cayman, persons below the age of 15 and over 70 did not have to get a Visa, but he did not get Jamaica to do the same for Caymanians going to Jamaica, and that is the premier that you fool fool voted in.

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    • Anonymous says:

      He did it so the very same Jamaicans that came here and aquired status could vote him back in.

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    • Anonymous says:

      You expected too much from him. Don’t you know better?
      I say keep the Visa in place. Criminals are slipping in anyway, so that is at least a screen of sorts. Only if they have a valid US Visa in past 5yrs. Those without a US Visa should still be screened with our Visa.

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