23 rookie cops begin basic training

| 21/01/2019 | 29 Comments
Cayman News Service

New RCIPS recruits began training January 2019 (CLICK TO ENLARGE)

(CNS): The first class of new Royal Cayman Islands Police Service recruits in 2019 got down to their studies Monday after the eight women and fifteen men, aged between 18 to 40, were all sworn in and began the classroom part of their basic training at the RCIPS centre on West Bay Road. This first group of trainee cops includes fourteen Caymanians and is one of the biggest classes of recruits in several years. Police Commissioner Derek Byrne said he was encouraged by the diverse backgrounds and experience of the class, which is nearly three times larger than the 2018 group of recruits, who are now on the beat.

But with a need to keep policing numbers up, recruitment is ongoing and the commissioner explained that another class is expected to begin their training in a few months. Byrne said this current class will be followed immediately by a second recruit class in May of equal size, which the police management is already selecting. That will be followed by another recruitment campaign this fall.

“These efforts not only bolster the numbers of officers in the service, but refresh the organisation with new ideas and more local perspective,” he said in a press release about the start of the training.

“Recruiting Caymanians continues to be a primary goal of the RCIPS, and I am pleased to note that we have far more Caymanian recruits in this class than last year,” Byrne said. “All of the recruits sworn in today have now joined the RCIPS family, and we look forward to their long and fruitful careers in the organisation, and to their contributions to the world class service we strive to provide as members of the wider civil service.”

The recruits were chosen following a local recruitment drive last August. After confirmation of minimum qualifications and a written exam, interview, fitness test and vetting, twenty-three candidates were offered places.

Unlike previous years, permanent residents and work permit holders residing in the Cayman Islands for four years or more were also allowed to apply and were considered for spots not filled by Caymanians. The police said that all Caymanian applicants who passed the vetting, exams and interview were offered a place before any other applicants.

With this recruitment training now underway, those who pass the course will graduate into operational duty in May. They will then progress to on-the-job training during a two-year probationary period. At the end of their probation, these new officers could be posted in units such as criminal investigation, traffic, marine, air operations, financial crime, family support, or the K-9 unit, based on operational needs and priorities.

“The policing field, like all others, requires new and additional skills to those in the past, such as a high level of ICT literacy and awareness, and an ability to easily adapt to change,” the commissioner stated.

“The best police officers of the future will be those who consider themselves lifelong learners. But the primary duty of police officers to serve the public has not, and will not, change. Having sworn to perform this duty, these recruits now have their chance to show us what they can do,” he added.

Tags:

Category: Crime, Police

Comments (29)

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  1. Anonymous says:

    I would be curious what the retention rate from prior classes was.

  2. Anonymous says:

    Good luck to all the new recruits whatever your status. We need decent, professional and honest officers to keep us safe, and where you were born should not be a factor. If you work hard and meet the grade then you should get your chance. Good to see a diverse intake, based on ability.

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  3. Anonymous says:

    The recruits have their chance to show “us” what they can do…..interesting! And here we are still waiting on the yahoos already employed as “Officers” trying to figure out what the hell they be doing!

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  4. Anonymous says:

    Good luck! It would have been nice to have their names also under the picture.

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  5. anonymous says:

    Can CNS confirm none of the 14 “Caymanians” are status holders or married to Caymanians?

    CNS: I can confirm that status holders are Caymanians.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Thumbs up for CNS

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    • Anonymous says:

      OMG what does it matter whether they are Caymanian or not? This is not the most pleasant of jobs as a lot of the time (not all) you are dealing with “scum of the earth” who have no respect for the law and abuse those good people that do try and live by it. It is a thankless task many a time. For those that go into this career and, wanting to make it just that, will need to put in hard work, unsociable hours, develop a thick skin as the Police are not well liked by many, are physically and mentally abused, forced to see situations which are upsetting etc. When the recruitment process took place, I am sure that any Caymanian that passed the English and Math test as well as the physical stood the best chance. For those that did not make the grade then try again the next time they are recruiting and between now and that time, brush up on what you failed on. Just because you like watching General Hospital on TV does not mean you can automatically become a surgeon. All the best to those that got through the process and I hope that you become decent offices, upholding the law, believing in what you should be doing.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Those that did not make it also have an opportunity to join the Special Constabulary. This would be a great assistance to you in making the grade the next time around. You can also attend UCCI to improve your English and Maths and or do online courses. Enjoy the outdoors and get fit or go to the gym. If you are serious about becoming a Police Officer, don’t give up.

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      • Anonymous says:

        It matters because certain foreign nationalities are dominating certain areas of the economy and the civil service. Local people have every right to be policed by local people.

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    • Anonymous says:

      More Caymanian than birth Caymanians! Check the laws.

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    • anonymous says:

      CNS They are at law, but have you ever heard the term “paper Caymanians” commonly used by “born Caymanians” to describe those such as the horde granted status by McKeeva Bush without the slightest background checks or qualification for such an honour.
      The commonly expressed wish of locals is that they should mostly be policed by their own native officers who understand their way of life which is a reasonable expectation. A large number of those referred to above had only lived here for a relatively short period and would not satisfy this expectation.

      CNS: By law, first generation Caymanians cannot be discriminated against in government hiring practices. However, the fact that not all the recruits were Caymanian, however you define that, means that not enough Caymanians either applied or got through the recruitment process, which means that even if the RCIPS was allowed to discriminate against “paper Caymanians” and did so, there would have been no more of what you call “locals” in this group. So if you want more “locals” you need to encourage them to apply. If they want the job, have the necessary academic qualifications and pass the physical and written tests, they are pretty much guaranteed to be selected.

      • anonymous says:

        CNS I was explaining the rationale for my question. The first requirement to comply with what the “locals” want in their police force is to ascertain how many have been accepted.

      • Anonymous says:

        CNS. Good point, but many first generation Caymanians may not be Caymanian at all, but rather “ghosts” created by mismanagement of the immigration system. A relatively recent cabinet status grant recipient was only discovered to not be Caymanian after being recruited by the police. I do not care whether the police are Caymanian or not for the reasons you raise, but they should know who is Caymanian and who is not.

  6. Ex Criminal says:

    Good luck! May the best man win.

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  7. Cayman Mon says:

    Congratulations! 14 young Caymanians joining the RCIPS. I do hope that they will be encouraged to further their training/education and given all the opportunity to move up in the ranks.

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    • Cayman Mon says:

      Thumbs down…REALLY! Yes, we should be welcoming to all but Caymanians should be given all the opportunities in their own Country to better themselves.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Ignore the trolls…….your reaction is what they want. They will even “thumbs down” comments offering condolences to the families of people who have passed away. They will probably “thumbs down” my response to you, and think they’re very funny!

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      • Anonymous says:

        “Unlike previous years, permanent residents and work permit holders residing in the Cayman Islands for four years or more were also allowed to apply and were considered for spots not filled by Caymanians. The police said that all Caymanian applicants who passed the vetting, exams and interview were offered a place before any other applicants.” In case you haven’t read the full news.

  8. Anonymous says:

    Serious question. What is the standard required and how does it differ from the minimum requirements to become a police constable in the U.K.?

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  9. Anonymous says:

    Congratulations to all! Remember it won’t be easy but it will be worth it. Stick with this choice you all have embarked on and do your best always. Cayman needs you. Thanks and blessings galore.

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  10. Some Guy says:

    Put them all in the traffic unit. Every last one of them!

    Then they can work on getting the drunks, drag racers, handicapped parking stealers, school zone speeders, tail gaters, non-indicator users, roundabout dummies, high-beam bullies and wheelie dirt bikers off the streets and put them all in Northward for the next 50 years.

    End rant.

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  11. Anonymous says:

    terrifying…

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    • Anonymous says:

      Congrats. We need Caymanians in the force. Thanks for your heart to serve in this essential service.

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  12. BeaumontZodecloun says:

    Welcome aboard, recruits. Your job will be challenging, often stressful, but hopefully rewarding and satisfying. There will be some replies here that will sound negative, and I encourage you to keep pushing forward, and forget about what is behind you, especially if it makes a whinging sound.

    Thank you. I hope to have an opportunity to thank any of you in person.

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