Opposition calls for more education spending

| 09/08/2018 | 96 Comments
Cayman News Service

Opposition Leader Ezzard Miller delivers his contribution to the budget deabte, 1 November 2017

(CNS) Opposition Leader Ezzard Miller is urging government to invest more cash in the education system in this budget cycle. The independent member for North Side said he plans to file a private member’s motion ahead of the next Legislative Assembly meeting calling for an injection of funds to help support schools. He also said that the opposition would be moving to form a teachers’ association. Echoing calls during the November budget meeting, Miller said he wanted the government to increase funding by diverting money from the 2018 surplus.

He also said that in addition to the much-needed investment and pay increase, teachers also need a platform that would provide them with a mechanism for more input on how the education system works.

“In our discussions with teachers we found that salary is an ongoing concern,” he said. “However, equally and often more important was the need for the recognition of their contribution, and an opportunity to have input in, and influence on, government’s decision-making on educational matters.”

Miller added that a teachers’ association would address this need for greater participation.

The comments from the opposition leader come in the wake of a recent inspection report that painted a disappointing picture of standards of achievement in government primary schools and comments from Education Council Chair Dan Scott.

In an interview with the Cayman Compass, Scott said that the council he leads will soon be implementing a ‘plan of action’ after over a year of examining the issues surrounding the local education system. Promising action and quick change, he said the government school system “will become competitive and very attractive”.

Miller said the opposition was pleased that some of the long-standing needs in the system were being addressed.

“The opposition endorses and supports the chairman’s bold assertion that it is now time to act, and look forward to some of these positive measures being put in place for the start of the new school year in September 2018, ” he said.

Miller said the opposition was in support of  an increase in teachers’ salaries to a minimum $5,000 per month, the delegation of authority and responsibility for individual schools to principals, revamping the curriculum with an emphasis on civics, Cayman history, technical and vocational education, and student deportment. He also supports driving up expectations and the reinstatement of A-Levels at government’s high schools.

The opposition stated during the budget debate last year that the government had not invested enough in education and that it was still being underfunded. Given the surplus the government was predicting, he and his colleagues said there was room for greater investment in government schools and suggested that the Unity government abandon plans for the controversial cruise port and invest in education instead.

See the full opposition statement here Education-Release

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Category: Education, Government Finance, Local News, Politics

Comments (96)

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  1. Anonymous says:

    Miller a true die hard caymanian I wish the rest of politicians would try the same…

    I would like to see a full time adult training center that I could attend to instead they spend millions on roads and round abouts.
    Maybe there is one and I don’t know of it??

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  2. Anonymous says:

    In a society such as ours – with little national defence to budget for – the primary expenditures should be education and health care. In the end, high spending on education can reduce health care costs because more educated people know better how to improve their health. It can also reduce spending on crime fighting also because more educated people generally gain more or better employment and not have to be involved in crime.

    Education first!

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    • Anonymous says:

      Cayman already spends more on education that the USA or UK.Money is not the primary issue. Hiring teachers from Third World Countries and expecting them to delivery first class education is a huge issue as is the creaming off of the top 30% of children into private schools.

  3. Anonymous says:

    Summary of my comment made on 11/08/2018 @5:52 pm:

    1. Leadership is an issue in the government schools.

    2. Parents are kept in the dark.

    3. Teachers are unappreciated, overworked, and stressed (by the bad leaders in the school; these leaders are disrespectful and biased).

    Politicians can only do so much and no more. Yes, they can give money, but they need to move some of the people.

    I will go on Cayman27 and say all of this if I got a chance to.

    • Anonymous says:

      Leaderships is an issue by but so is performance management which allows failing teachers to stay teaching, and/or moved from school to school rather than not renew contracts.

  4. Anonymous says:

    I have been a teacher for 15 years and never have I earned as much money as when I was teaching in Cayman 3 years ago. Granted, I don’t have any children so what I earn is mine, but to me it was loads and it was tax free! I am now back in the UK earning half of what I was before and having to pay tax on it. So I do not agree that teachers do not earn very much in Cayman, it’s a decent wage in my opinion. I feel poor now and miss those Cayman days. Maybe it’s just the UK with a really low wage and other countries pay more.

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    • Anonymous says:

      What a canned comment.

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    • Anonymous says:

      It’s a “decent” wage but not on par with other jobs in the Cayman Islands with such vast responsibility/stress. This is one reason for high turnover.

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      • Anonymous says:

        How long are they off for summer? 2 months? Nice.

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        • Anonymous says:

          And then its back to redeveloping PTSD for another 10 months with the little angels. Could not pay me a millions dollars.

        • Anonymous says:

          You clearly have no idea of what it is like to walk into a classroom at 7.30 and have 20 odd children looking to you for attention, reassurance, education, love, support etc. You do not know what it is like to be physically and verbally abused by parents and children, to not have time to have a bathroom break or lunch, and then at the end of your day, set about planning.

  5. Anonymous says:

    Has Julie even visited the schools yet ?

    • Anonymous says:

      Oh she has and shown her ignorance of education all the way. Never mind, she has ticked the boxes, sorting out a higher wage without tackling the real problem of poor performance and nepotism.

  6. Anonymous says:

    As a teacher in Cayman I have worked in more than one government schools and all I can say is that leadership in the schools is one of the main problems. While Mr. Miller deems more money would fix the issue; he should also know that some principals receive the money and some teachers never see the money. For example there is money provided for resources. Some principals give that money to their “friends” in the school and everyone else suffer or teachers have to use their money to buy classroom supplies; fix that problem before you hand out money to the schools. The school I am at currently at, I never had to purchase one item not even a pen, I only buy things that I fancy as I am young and I’m into Pinterest these are items I can live without as opposed to another school I was at; there was no chart paper to write on, no markers, paper towel, tissue, etc.

    On to my other point, parent involvement while a lot of people are crying out that parents need to be more involved while this may be true to an extent. There are parents out there who want to be involved who want to know more, but guess what? Some teachers, principals, and whoever else try to keep them in the dark. I was told in one school that parents shouldn’t get my number or direct contact just email. How many parents in Cayman do you think sit at desktops or even have internet at home to be worried about sending emails?

    Another thing, teacher salary needs to be increased for sure, but while doing that ensure that the classroom/ school environment is safe for teachers. One way to do this is address behavioral issues. For example, students who are known to disrupt the classroom should not be allowed in the regular classroom setting that holds back effective teaching and learning. This is why teachers don’t want to stay in government classrooms. I do understand that children need guidance, but some are literally out of control i.e. the ones that think they can fight me, the teacher, the bullies, the ones that pound the tables for attention, etc.

    As we approach a new school year, I only have one thing in mind if this year is as horrible as the last two years, I am quitting. There is no money or incentive that can keep me in the classroom if improper leadership, keeping the parents misinformed, and dealing with constant disruption remain.

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    • Anonymous says:

      If people don’t name names nothing will ever change!

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    • Anonymous says:

      I am sorry to say that your grammar skills are not what I would want my child to be taught. I had to stop reading.
      You do not end a sentence with a preposition.
      Example – “where are you?”, NOT “where are you at?”

      Where are you at? As my mother used to say, sitting on the A looking over the T.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Maybe you stopped reading because all you read was pure truth and you like some other parent support the way in which your child is being educated then again you may or may not because your child attend the school where everything is a secret or everything is fake.

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        • Anonymous says:

          You have a strange truth. There is no cover up except for those posing as Christian who set out to deceive inspectors.

      • Anonymous says:

        Agreed. Very poor.

        “The school I am at currently at, I never had to purchase one item not even a pen, I only buy things that I fancy as I am young and I’m into Pinterest these are items I can live without as opposed to another school I was at; there was no chart paper to write on, no markers, paper towel, tissue, etc.”

    • Anonymous says:

      With such poor English writing skills, maybe quitting would be appropriate for the sake of our children.

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  7. Anonymous says:

    I’m surprised that as of this writing, there are only 26 comments on this article that had been published 2 and half days ago. If the article was about Gay people or same-sex marriage, there would be a guaranteed 100+ comments by the first 24 hours after publishing. This just indicates how much people in Cayman care about education, or at best where priorities lie.

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    • Anonymous says:

      No more money to waste on education because it is going no where. Get the new dock done and our infrastructure up to date as our Unity Team leaders are doing. This Miller man just talks to hear himself but at the end of the day he doesn’t care either as long as those big paychecks keep coming. Well boys if development dries up so will your paychecks!

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    • Anonymous says:

      I wouldn’t equate the fight for basic human rights to the politics of public school.

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    • Diogenes says:

      You people who constantly comment this, do realize that it is possible to care about more than one issue at once

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    • Ron Ebanks says:

      The problems in the education system , look at it from the top/Minister down . No Company /Business will succeed if the leader doesn’t know what he/she is doing to run it . What is the present /past Ministers qualifications in the education field ?
      Does the private Schools have that kind of leadership in them ? So there’s your biggest problems in the government run Schools . LEADERSHIP is always important, without that you’re going nowhere.

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  8. Anonymous says:

    great news for franz….. but mo money mo problems
    won’t solve anything.

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  9. Anonymous says:

    How long has Ezzard been in government, how long has the problem existed? What a waste of space.

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  10. Anonymous says:

    mr dan scott, you listening? not all our kids want to be cpa’s as you are?! you in charge of education, make the change…give them more options man….????

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    • Anonymous says:

      For those who commented about Miller single-mindedly throwing money at the problem, what this press statement does not show is his concern that parents be included in the group from whom there needs to be greater expectations. He fully acknowledges that this problem is not just about teacher performance.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Of course, the problem could only be the teachers or the students. No mention of his buddy-leaders who are the real cause of the disorganized and chaotic state of affairs.

        He takes us all for fools while laughing all the way to the bank with the incompetent leadership who are his friends.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Cayman is a country where women don’t rear their own children. Nannies, nurseries, helpers do that because people do not have time. There appears little interest in getting involved in decision making when they are not interested in rearing their own children. I understand the need for two people to work, but you make your choices.

    • Anonymous says:

      The CO for education is Christen Suckoo

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      • Anonymous says:

        And ? The CO implements the policies of the Minister, we don’t elect COs…

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        • Anonymous says:

          The Minister of Education is currently bypassing all the experts and instead likes education to be run by the Education Council who know absolutely nothing.

      • Anonymous says:

        Who is the Minister ?
        Who is the Director of Education Services ?
        Doesn’t Cabinet set the budget ?
        Let’s name and Shame all of them

    • Mike says:

      Agree with 5.48 pm. Bring back the vocational school option that The Community College used to offer years ago until the geniuses turned it into a university. Give Caymanian youngsters the skills training that would enable them to replace many of those work permits, then those students that are not academically inclined, and often demonstrate this with disruptive behaviour, can be channeled into useful careers. It’s a no brainer, and I struggle to understand why this not being done.

      Is it that Govt. really wants the work permit revenue more than helping young Caymanians?

  11. Anonymous says:

    govt tells kids they need study business as well!!!!! when i applied for hovt scholarship that is what they told me….i wanted to study biology…niw i am wonderfully…absolutelt miserable working as a CPA ????????????

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    • Anonymous says:

      The good news kids, is that you can be semi-literate and still be a CPA!

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      • P&L says:

        These could be hastily made typos rather than misspellings but if you are still able to hear the point being made it is a good one.

        For many years students in have been steered toward a limited number of professions… chasing the pot at the end of the rainbow. This is demonstrated by an overemphasis in supporting majors in certain fields while offering very limited options in terms of other academic disciplines or trade and vocational training.

        Now years later our economy has slightly expanded to include a wider range of professional options yet our educational options have not expanded with it.

        And steering people toward money and away from their passions… like biology… is not a good way to build a thriving and engaged workforce at any level. It’s a way to make people miserable on a daily basis. We spend too much time at work to be unhappy and it has shown people are more productive employees when they feel a connection to their work.

        • Anonymous says:

          Excellent comment. @ 1:58 pm

        • Anonymous says:

          Thank you @1:58 PM, everyone looking for typos and missing the point.

          1. Leadership sucks in the government schools.

          2. Parents are kept in the dark.

          3. Teachers are underpaid, unappreciated, overworked, and stressed.

          Politicians can only do so much and no more. Yes, they can give money, but they need to move some of the people.

          • Anonymous says:

            Typos, missing and nonsensical words, poor grammar and childish punctuation but other than that they make a great point.

  12. Anonymous says:

    At the risk of being rediculed I don’t think that 5,000 p.m,is to much for a starting salary whether they have batchelor or master degree. A good experienced teacher should actually be paid more. A good teacher gives the students homework and spends many hours preparing her/himself to teach and impart the subject matter the next day. A good teacher sometimes has to hang around the classroom waiting on tardy parents to come collect their children and does not get paid overtime. A good teacher takes money out of her purse to pay for lunch for her pupils whose parents spent all the family money on finger nails, weaves, shoes, beers etc. a good teacher picks up the phone and try to reach parents who refuse to attend parent teachers meetings and reporting sessions etc. a good teacher is worth her his weight in gold and while we cannot afford to pay that, surely we can afford a starting salary of CI$ 5,000 per month and show a little appreciation along with it.

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    • Anonymous says:

      A good teacher is indeed worth their weight in gold but I’m puzzled why even the bad ones are apparently worth 5k a month?

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      • Anonymous says:

        One would hope that ideally there are no “bad teachers”
        If there are the amount we pay them would be inconsequential, if any teachers are classified as “bad teachers” should they be hired in the first place, or should they keep their jobs?

    • Anonymous says:

      You are describing a good person not a good teacher!

  13. Anonymous says:

    Money solves all problems and keeps idiots in office.

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  14. cess pita says:

    The $5,000 minimum salary is a good idea, but has to be earned. A lot of teachers currently in the system need to be laid off before implementation.

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    • Anonymous says:

      One of the problems with the education system in Cayman is that Cayman is no longer an attractive destination when it comes to teacher recruitment. It is becoming harder to recruit COMPETENT expatriate teachers and there is no effort to push education in Cayman amongst graduating high school students as a viable career path. One of the mandates of the Cayman Islands Strategic Plan for Education 2012-2017 is “invest in attracting, developing, empowering and RETAINING (emphasis added) highly skilled, passionate and caring educators” among others. My question to the readers of this comment is, “what are we as a society doing to retain good teachers?” Teaching is no longer viewed as a respectable profession in our society where a teacher can hold their heads high and be proud of what they do. Rather teaching is often viewed as a “baby-sitting service” where parents who can’t even stand their own children get some respite for 8 hours a day 5 days a week.

      Teachers, like any other human or sentient creature for that matter respond to incentives. Those incentives can be both tangible (in the form of money) or intangible (in the form of the respect the wider society gives them). These two categories of incentives lead to a sense of self-worth and a feeling that the teacher is making a valuable and valued contribution to society. But examine some of what has happened in Cayman:

      1.) Teacher salaries are low (or at least lower than other more attractive jurisdictions) where the cost of living is high in Cayman;

      2.) Teacher-salary remains stagnant even when teachers go off and get further qualifications in their profession.

      So the external, tangible incentives are not there. But then again, teachers don’t go into the profession to make money. They usually go into it because they want to make that valuable contribution to society and this usually leaves the teacher feeling good about that contribution – the internal, intangible incentive. However, those intangible incentives have been eroding due to:

      3.) the sense of ingratitude and entitlement from BOTH students and their parents;

      4.) the emphasis on students’ rights and children’s rights where teachers feel like they have no rights;

      5.) the general view society has of teachers that they’re incompetent and not valuable to society. in many cases, this attitude is reflected in the media or jokes of which teachers are the target or butt.

      I could go on and on, but the general idea is THERE IS VERY LITTLE INCENTIVE TO TEACH IN CAYMAN. The good teachers that do remain, stay on because they have financial responsibilities to take care of. That, or they’re actively looking for other jobs to leave the classroom – and where they can’t leave for one reason or another, many just simply mentally check-out.

      I remember there being a write up in the papers about three or four years ago of the public education system in Cayman having a turnover rate of 20% for that particular year. In one particular school (which shall remain nameless in this comment), a turnover rate of between 10% to 20% has been the norm for the past 6 years. That’s one fifth of a company’s workforce leaving every year. You would think, those in positions of power would look at that trend and wonder why this has been happening and put things in place to stop and reverse it. And perhaps this is Mr. Miller’s effort, as leader of the opposition, of holding the government to task.

      Increased resources would be a welcome start, but something tells me Mr. Miller and the educators of the Cayman Islands have white-crested waves ahead of them.

      After all, we need to have a world-class airport and world-class cruise docking facility before we can have a world-class education.

      Selah.

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      • Anonymous says:

        1:44 pm, you may have had some good points, but the tone was a turn-off, referring to teachers as providing a “baby-sitting service” for parents who “can’t stand” their children. Inaccurately writing off the population like that is a fallacy that undermined your argument.

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        • Anonymous says:

          I don’t think the author was “writing off the population”. Many people do feel like the schools are a babysitting service even though they may not verbalize it as such.

          I have been a teacher in the public education system for over ten years. I know it is not politically correct to say (or even a pleasant thought), but after interacting with literally thousands of students during my tenure and their parents, I am confident in saying that there are many parents who, even though they love their children, CANNOT STAND THEM. For example, I’ve had parents sit down before me in parents’ evening bemoaning the “long” vacations teachers receive – I will never forget what one parent said to me during one of those evenings: “I don’t know why you all get so much vacation. What do you expect me to do with my son for 2 months during the summer?” Those were the woman’s words verbatim. Some time after that, another parent said to her child, IN MY PRESENCE, that “I’m sick of this f****** s***. Why the school have to keep calling me for your a**? This the reason why your father and me break up. I should have aborted your a** when I had the chance.”

          Now admittedly, this latter example was a bit extreme (and that parent was reported to the relevant authorities) but this is the reality for many of our young people. They are resented by their parents, face a lot of verbal and physical abuse, and the parents are relieved to be away from their children during the day. However, if the teachers even say anything disagreeable to the child, many of these same parents are quick to rush the school, cuss the teachers out, threaten violence against staff, write the ministry, etc.

          The situation is becoming untenable in Cayman and the author was only pointing out reasons why teachers are leaving the public system in Cayman in droves.

          You may be one of many parents who enjoy their children, however, I would urge you not to ignore the fact that there are many parents within our beloved islands who don’t feel the same.

  15. Anonymous says:

    Well I don’t think just giving teachers a raise is the answer. I think it is a start. Now you can’t just give the raise to any teacher, and you do have to look at the root of the problem which is the parents at home don’t care about the children enough to help them with school work. Does that mean you also throw some money at after school programs and summer programs? Mentors who get paid may be something to look at?

    I don’t know I’m just trying to figure out how to show these kids someone does care about them because love is lost in their own home, how heartbreaking is that?! My own children never go a day with hugs and kisses and smiles and comfort! That’s free and its proven to work!

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    • Anonymous says:

      Sorry without*

    • Anonymous says:

      The staggering ignorance of poor leadership and how it is the lynchpin of most problems is how leaders can continue to provide solutions with no results. Leaders are not addressing your concerns.

    • Anonymous says:

      I think the problems are also that children are expected to learn and be disciplined at school, but then they go home to a non-disciplined home life, which is far more appealing, naturally. This Dartland has majorly contributed to drug/alcohol use and crime. So many Caymanians lost their Employment, which spiraled down in many cases of being passed over for gainful or any employment due to the favorism of Work Permit holders. Businesses are blooming, some only have foreign workers because no one checks nor cares if Caymanians are employed there. Many have resorted to inbibing in drugs and alcohol. And became addicted. Crime has increased in seriousness of, too. SCARY. Welcome to the Cayman Islands?

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    • Anonymous says:

      Teachers need to be srutinized before any pay raise, especially for expats…and drug tested. Drug testing should be mandatory before a Work Permit is issued and conducted randomly throughout the year. Lots of sniffling White Collar workers out there…

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      • Anonymous says:

        Why 5.53 pm would you say “especially the expats”? Please explain why you seek to discriminate between expats and Caymanians in this matter? They all teach the same kids regardless of their ethnicity.

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  16. Anonymous says:

    I thought government already spent more per pupils than the private schools! Clearly money isn’t the problem.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Poor leadership is the problem, and they need to keep their jobs regardless of solving any problems.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Like in any organization that has a high turnover-rate, the problem is management: from middle managers (i.e. the leaders of the schools) right up to the top at the ministry.

    • Anonymous says:

      Perhaps those who disagree can explain how the private schools can provide a world class education for less money per pupil than CIG then. If it’s not money then, how will throwing more at the problem help?

      • Anonymous says:

        Private schools have a greater degree of autonomy and must compete with other private schools for the tuition they receive from students. This alone, provides an incentive for private schools to perform well to attract more money via students. The end result being these schools are providing value for money.

        Also, because the schools are private, they have the power to expel students who are either not performing to the set standard, or more importantly, expel students who are belligerent and disruptive to the learning process. Public schools don’t have that autonomy.

      • Anonymous says:

        We do not have evidence that the private schools are providing a world class education. What we do know is that 35% of our brightest children are creamed off from the public sector and go to private schools. We also know that a disproportionate number of children who attend private schools also receive private tuition outside of schools hours which could suggest the teaching going on in them is not up to standard.

  17. Anonymous says:

    they get degree’s and cant find job when come back? and they are compelled to study what the sponsors want them to do….mostly business…..and…..spend rest of life unhappy?

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  18. Anonymous says:

    I would be in agreement to increase teachers salaries to a $5,000 minimum, but they need to have masters degrees in Education and meet targets for student achievement in their class. But I am afraid Mr. Miller is just out to get votes and build up is political value with his no real strategy salary increase and education spend campaign.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Unless you forget. It was the current minister that proposed it. He is supporting what she proposed.

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    • Anonymous says:

      If you don’t pay proper salaries, you will never attract good teachers. Invest in the future Cayman, invest in teaching how to work and what is expected, invest in vocational education…a generation is being lost and unless it changes future generations will be lost too.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Many do have Masters but the trend is from bogus online “universities”; ie: Walden, Etc.

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      • Anonymous says:

        …and…many have graduate degrees and/or 10-20+ years of experience, but are consistently passed over for the more junior teachers who end up getting promotions with the raised salaries – this usually happens due to typical nepotism that is rampant in Cayman (i.e. who knows who, who goes to the same churches or social circles, who is sleeping with whom, etc.) I don’t know of any organization where such a modus operandi would inspire existing workers to perform their best, much less attracting and retaining talent.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Isn’t the new senior civil servant a Walden grad?!

  19. Anonymous says:

    Typical politician response. Got a problem, don’t really get to the core of the problem, Just throw more tax payer money for an easy win.

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    • Anonymous says:

      5:10 you are correct; the standard Cayman solution is to throw money and play the perception game the same is done with crime without success. Also do not ruffle the voters feathers but suggesting they have a role in the problem and solution.

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  20. Anonymous says:

    spending is not the solution. think harder cayman.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Usually I would agree with you here but this is one case where education needs some serious resources thrown at it. Ask any teacher in public education.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Shocker! Teachers think they should be paid more. Not entirely sure how paying all teachers, regardless of skill, effort or results is supposed to improve the standard of teaching though.

  21. Ron Ebanks says:

    I think Mr. Miller needs to ask himself some questions before he starts throwing money at something that he really is not sure what the problem is .He said that the last inspection of the School system painted a poor results. So who and what has caused this bad results or deteriorating condition in the Schools ? Throwing money into something that wouldn’t fix the problem , is wasted money . Why are the kids doing so poorly in the public Schools ? Who are to be blamed for that ? Who are overseeing the quality of Teacher ?

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    • Anonymous says:

      The whole long and short of it is, the trend among most parents in Cayman is that they don’t want to take any responsibility for their own children. They hand over their children to the schools to raise them. But should the schools do something that they disagree with, they’re quick to pick up arms and blame the schools.

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  22. Anonymous says:

    More spending with the same leadership. Sounds like a pay-off, not an investment.

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  23. Anonymous says:

    Governments want people to stay uneducated.
    Just imagine what would happen if people knew what the real world looks like.

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  24. Anonymous says:

    I really didn’t like Ezzard before but he is beginning to grow on me. It is time for us to put up or shut up when it comes to education. Forget about the port. Invest in our children. They are the best investment for a better future.

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    • Anonymous says:

      An investment so he stays in power, not for changing the leadership.

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      • Anonymous says:

        You do know that Ezzard is in the Opposition right? How is he “in power” again? And if he gets “in power” because of this, will it really matter as long as education improves in Cayman?

        • Anonymous says:

          Nobody believes the fake party system. At the end of the day they all take home a large check and pat each other on the back. He is in a position of influence regardless how many times they shuffle the chairs on the titanic.

          But the real point is education wont improve if he is or isn’t in power which is why we need better leaders who actually will lead, not just warm a seat and “make it rain” every now and then.

  25. Anonymous says:

    As driftwood it’s hard for me to say but this guy seems to be one of the few politicians that cares about Caymanians.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Keep researching. It’s more that he is a great friend to the press. He gives great quotes!

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    • Ron Ebanks says:

      You must be a good piece of mahogany driftwood to be thinking like that . I agree with you 100% .

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    • Anonymous says:

      7:47, I agree with you. Unfortunately, the majority of the voting public lack the knowledge to k ow a good thing when they see it. Too east are the voting block distracted with beef, turtle, a load of marl etc.

      Mr. Miller, who sometimes take unpopular stance on certain matters, seem to be one of the few that has a grasp on reality; as far as politicians go.

      It is mind blowing to hear the same people moan and complain about how they are suffering, but yet they continually elect the same people who inflict the suffering on them.

      15
      2
    • Anonymous says:

      He’s always cared.

      9
      3

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