Manderson backs CoP’s move to recruit residents

| 13/08/2018 | 117 Comments

(CNS): Acting Governor Franz Manderson has backed a move by Police Commissioner Derek Byrne to recruit foreign residents for entry-level positions to the RCIPS after the opposition called on him to prevent the change in policy. Manderson said that locals would still be given priority, even though the criteria have been broadened. CoP Byrne revealed last week that he was extending the recruitment period for two more weeks and opening it to people resident here for four years or more. But Opposition Leader Ezzard Miller said transient groups did not need representation in the RCIPS and the move would make things harder for locals.

“Once again, the government is making it difficult for Caymanians to secure employment in their own country,” Miller said in a statement Friday. “We reject the commissioner’s rationale that transient groups in the community should have representation in the police force, particularly in view of the role of cultural awareness and knowledge in maintaining public safety and effective policing.”

The police have already received 82 applications from Caymanians and permanent residents. However, the potential applicants have not yet been assessed, and rather than risk having a shortfall for the next training course for new recruits, the commissioner lifted some of the restrictions of status with a view to reflect the diversity of the Cayman community.

Standing by that decision, a spokesperson for the commissioner told CNS that the express objective continues to be the recruitment of Caymanians first and foremost.

The acting governor reiterated that position, stating that the commissioner had made it clear that he is following local legislation that requires Caymanians to be given first preference for available jobs.

“The commissioner has a proven track record of making every attempt to increase the number of Caymanians in the RCIPS, including opening the application process for Caymanians to apply to join the RCIPS as an ongoing process throughout the year. I recently attended the RCIPS graduating class of 2018 in which the entire class of nine were Caymanians,” he said. “I believe it is important to point out that the criticisms levelled at the commissioner, do not accurately capture his comments, given the applicants have only just applied and are at stage one of the recruitment process.”

Manderson said that none of the applicants so far have been determined as “suitable candidates” but are people meeting the minimum criteria.

“The recruitment process, which includes comprehensive testing, vetting and an interview process, will determine how many applicants are suitable candidates,” he said. “I join the commissioner in encouraging Caymanians to use the extension of the deadline to apply to join the RCIPS. Having spent the first 28 years of my civil service career in a law enforcement department, I can testify to the great job satisfaction of knowing that you are working to keep the Cayman Islands safe, whether it is removing unscrupulous persons from our islands or arresting persons who seek to interrupt the peace and tranquility that our islands are known for.”

Miller had expressed concerns about the commissioner’s decision to abandon the long-standing policy to limit eligibility to Caymanians and permanent residents, and with 82 applicants Miller said he did not see why the commissioner needed more candidates when the classes are usually made up of around 12 or 15 people. He said it “should not be difficult” to select 15 from a pool of 82 to fill the class, the opposition leader added.

Miller recommended that the commissioner expand the class size to 25 to give more local people a chance to serve their own country.

“If Commissioner Byrne wants to revise his recruitment criteria from the current educational standards and to review screening procedures and protocols, he is free to do so, but the basic nationality and residency requirement should not be tampered with,” Miller stated. “There is a reason that we have long limited recruitment to nationals and permanent residents and there is every reason that we should continue to maintain that basic standard.”

He pointed to the need for “strong relationships of mutual trust between police agencies and the communities they serve” to maintain public safety. Miller said he and the opposition members were concerned as well by the risk of suitable Caymanians being sidelined, and “robbing them of the chance to service their country in the noble field of policing”. He said that bringing “transients into the mix” could undermine the goals of any police service.

Clarification: In response to several comments on the matter, the RCIPS stressed that the figure of 81 people referred to the number of applications they had received at that point from those who were eligible, before any screening had been done to determine if they were suitable. A local media publication mistakenly referred to them as “suitable” applicants, which has caused some confusion. The RCIPS release on the matter can be found here.

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Category: Crime, Jobs, Local News, Police

Comments (117)

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  1. Anonymous says:

    Today one of our local newspapers carries a story that there are dozens of police officers in the Philippines presently under investigation for serious crimes – including rape, kidnapping, extortion and drug dealing. With our strong connection to Filipino employment and considering the current RCIPS recruitment drive to include foreigners, I hope and pray that the powers-that-be will pay attention to that news item and do very serious vetting if there are any Filipino applicants. Vetting should be done through the Philippines National Bureau of Investigation (their version of the FBI) – nothing less!

    However, knowing the standard of leadership in our country, very few pay attention to what is happening in the outside world!

  2. Anon says:

    The bottom line is this: If Cayman seeks immigration from countries with populations that are high trust, high empathy, high average intelligence, low violence, high rates of law abiding, and have high skills, then Cayman will become more like those countries. On the other hand, if Cayman permits immigration from countries with populations that are low trust, low IQ, easily triggered to violence, have high crime rates, and low skill rates, then Cayman will gradually become a hellhole. A country’s averages in the above characteristics can easily be determined by looking at statistics. Those should determine immigration policy.

  3. MM says:

    Or Government is taking a fast and proactive approach to handling the expected rising crime in Cayman. As things continue to get hard for the poor and middle classes and as our public education system continues to fail the most desperate students we should all be expecting hire robbery, burglary, murder and other desperate crime happenings.

    This Government (and their puppet masters) are all well aware of what is happening in this country and they are preparing for it in advance. They know Caymanians are (finally) getting sick and tired of being sold out and pushed out of their own heritage (by their own people and own leaders) who have been elevated to leadership and privileged positions by tossing around promises and lies.

    It has been almost 4 decades since social decay was first recognized; it has been at least 2 of those decades that our older folk started raising concerns about the unfettered way our Government likes to toss public money and public resources to private investors and private companies who see the CI Gov as a bunch of inexperienced political goons who are easy to push over and fluff with a 100 page template of fancy promises for the people and the country in order to capitalize on millions of dollars of duty waivers and more millions in profits by using the tax-free status of our country which our ancestors risked their lives to provide.

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  4. RICK says:

    Having an expat police force is the better solution for law and order on an island where everyone know everyone and are all interconected.
    A family member charging or arresting his kind?
    The entire police force should all be expats, that way they have no obligation when it comes to law and order.
    We all know that Caymanian cops turn the other way when family members are breaking the laws.

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    • Anonymous says:

      a brother will think a long time before he arrest his brother!

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    • Anonymous says:

      4:10 pm agree 100%

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    • Co Worker says:

      Yes Ricky you mean those same expats who are given authority who with malice take care their very own including arresting locals for DUI and whilst driving their drunken buddies and their countrymen and women home. Where others bury cases and take sides in disputes and carryout arbitrary arrest against those locals who they deem to be wrong but the law says otherwise. Yes and they don’t turn the other way they blatantly and openly commit their corrupt and bias unlawful acts so all can see and understand “We Run Tings” just like they do in their third own world jurisdictions whence they hail from. Caymanians don’t have the monopoly on corruption we learnt it from those just like you who believed your racist feudal system is above the law and should only apply to common people. You still upset Ricky bout your little work place mishap where you never got any rights for not keeping your white privileged hands to yourself aaaah bobo i feel it for you should have been charged not fired!

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      • RICK says:

        Co-worker, ole buddy I am far being white and have never worked under a work permit. I will never subject myself to a Caymanian plantation system and be treated like a second class citizens where I am subjected to the wimms and fancies of Caymanians and their backward thinking CIG.

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  5. Anonymous says:

    What we need are revised DPP case-criteria, evidence standards/security, and more cooperating Caymanian witnesses.

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  6. Cayman Think says:

    But here is the question of questions –

    Why do we need to increase the police force???

    Because of Crime??? Really?! With all the CCTV camaras, special car licensed plates, enough surveillance to spy on the whole population!

    Why not increase Immigration, protect our borders, beef up on education, and focus on stimulating the economy?

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  7. Anonymous says:

    We already have too many “entry-level” RCIPS officers…all the way to the top! Cut back quantity of do-nothings and increase living wages for productive officers. Give them a standard and incentive to strive for please. I don’t care where they come from as long as they can carry out a passing effort!

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  8. RICK says:

    Don’t see what’s the problem here as Caymanians are now granted the Nice program which is exclusive to them only.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Woah… two weeks of work

      Fellow Caymanians, check your privilege

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    • Anonymous says:

      Rick, I don’t believe that you are saying that.The NiCe programme is a handout. It does not pay the rent either singly or over time. That is the problem.

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    • PLEASE IGNORE RICK. RICK IS A TROLL. says:

      Rick has admitted in previously posted comments that he does not live in Cayman. He is a troll. Please ignore his comments.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Yep and he is known to hit the bottle…Rick, you really need to go back to the meetings..

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      • RICK says:

        Yup I don’t live in Cayman and would never want too. I prefer law and order and where people don’t my bussiness or gossip all day long while looking to stab you in the back.

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        • Anonymously says:

          So you dont live here – out-of-touch with the people, yet you make comments about us? What a moron! Get a life and think about your own community!

      • Anonymous says:

        Orcs complaining about Trolls. Time to take a break from the keyboard and sign up for WORC, Orc.

  9. Enforcement oldtimer says:

    The DG’s actions never ceases to amaze Caymanians, yet he claims he wants to keep Cayman safe from unscrupulous people. Who he has invited here and now want them to administer law and order Wow bro!

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  10. Concerned individual says:

    I am an expat working in a company somewhere in Savannah, we had a break in and experienced policing activity just recently. Sorry to tell but the I saw 2 pictures of policing in Cayman. I commend the local police that did the finger printing work, I think she was very keen and serious on what she was doing, I think she did her job very well, I have asked her how long was she with this work, she said just over a year, hope her boss would know that she was really doing her job.
    On the other hand, there was this obviously was not caymanian police who initially came to see the scene, Never seen him look around for possible entry point in our compound, just jotting all the remarks I gave him and he left. I even told him after hours of the burglary that we saw our fence cut out and probably was the area where they went through, sadly he never came, he just called the young caymanian lady to check on finger print and within a few minutes she was there, search around and again did a work a police should do.
    I even told this story to some of my friends and they said its true, police have been hiring non caymanian for some time now, but what they tend to forget is that caymanian have a passion that some non local dont have.
    This is their country, they wanted it to be free from criminals, and im sure they wanted policing to work well not only for their duty but for their own self and family interest as well.
    Just sharing a thought.
    I am not biased but this is what I experienced just recently.

    I Have a suggestion, if they will hire expats to do police, can they scrutinize the prospective applicant very well? Like oral and written english language proficiency should be very good or higher? Should pass culture and history exam for the cayman islands? Had previous relevant experience in policing in investigation? Pass a stringent policing exam in the cayman islands.

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  11. Cayman Prostitution says:

    How Sad for these little islands that we have absolutely no one other than Mr Miller to stop this onslaught and marginalization of Cayman. The only unscrupulous people i see are those arriving here now and you Mr Manderson and like you they are not leaving but increasing in numbers and are making Cayman less safe less tranquil and less peaceful and are now attacking ,destroying and polluting our precious environment too!

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  12. Outrunner says:

    This endless police game with the highest per capita police apparatus in the world certainly in this region 63,000 person – 400 police Why do we need soooo much police???? Why are we constantly expanding this population on this tiny little island and who for??? Who are allowing crime to escalate and why is crime escalating. Why did they allow certain effective police units and strategies to be totally destroyed and dismantled creating this ineffective inept and incompetent and in some instances corrupt enormous police service,filled with foreign nationals from jurisdictions with even more serious corruption issues than we have? Why do we need to allow a police force to reflect the diversity of the community??? Thus allowing a foreign minority to control and run the entire law enforcement apparatus Judges,prosecutors Prison, police and other key govt posts. Finally Cayman is neither safe nor tranquil or peaceful any more Mr Franz Manderson and those unscrupulous people you are referring to are not leaving or being remove as you claim but infact are become just like you! Cayman support Mr Miller because this not about him its about our children future in Cayman.

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    • Anonymous says:

      People complain about wanting more visible police, more patrols, want the Marine Unit to be 24/7.

      Then turn around say the service doesn’t need so many police.

      All those things require more personnel, not less.

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  13. Cayman Biting Ants says:

    Wow ! Franz, a flock of vultures now descend to finish pick the bones clean eh? after Caymanians have been slain now the burning and looting starts? Yes Folks here’s frannnz your new governor demonstrating yet again exactly how much care for us!

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  14. Anonymous says:

    legalize ganja and band all assholes, Cayman would be a better place without the assholes

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  15. Anonymous says:

    Why do they have to cap the age at 40? There are able bodied Caymanians aged 41, 42, 44, 45 who also meet the criteria. I dont think they should have a cap at 40….everyone shld be considered on their own merits and physical abilities etc.

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  16. Anonymous says:

    “Noble field of policing”. What’s so noble about being a hired thug for this corrupt government?

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  17. Brushed Up says:

    To even suggest this knowing the level of corruption that now exist not to mention clear and obvious bias that currently exist in govt not to mention the RCIPS which is inundated with foreign nationals and foreign criminal influences already is national disgrace,crime is not getting better but worse but by adding totally foreign dynamic to this situation is recipe for disaster. When this situation evolves and we end up in Haitian law enforcement type of scenario i wonder if our savior franz will rescue us from the clutches of organize criminal police state we paid for. Yes keep following these people good ideas and see exactly where you freedoms whined up???

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  18. Anonymous says:

    All the commissioner did not say he had any suitable candidates. He said he had candidates that met the basic criteria.

    Come on get the facts.

    I support our acting Governor. Where were you when he was deporting people from the Islands and making Cayman safe. And if it’s not safe why is it we had 1000 applicants for PR and no one wants ro leave.

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  19. Anonymous says:

    Cayman needs to get serious about crime. Ezzard is not serious about it. The current Chief does appear to be serious and should be supported, rather being criticised from the sidelines by the guy who gets elected with 300 votes.

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  20. Elvis says:

    Caymanian, Jamaicans, English, American, Canadian, can’t we just hire people who fit the criteria regardless

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  21. Anonymous says:

    Lets sum this up and cut through all the political double-speak from Manderson:

    “The civil service, boards and government authorities can do what they want and I will simply smile and nod”

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    • Anonymous says:

      No 4:43 finally we have a Caymanian who is willing to stand up for what is right. A Caymanian who is not afraid to go against the “popular thing” which is obviously the “wrong thing”.

      Thank you acting Governor. You make us proud.

      Remember Miller campaign promise was to shut down work permits until all caymanians were employed. Just imagine what Cayman would be like if he did that.

      That thinking is what ruined Bahamas and made Cayman.

      We need capable policemen! That must be the end game.

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      • Anonymous says:

        you should apply for a job there. oh I forgot your not Bahamian. and I don’t recall see many of the here looking for work. I wonder why?

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      • Anonymous says:

        Double speak yes! Manderson please support the basic Caymanain trying to make a career! You allowed for that in the other uniform depts., why not the police!

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      • Peace says:

        Now you don’t ga much sense.

  22. Shameful says:

    Caymanians: Illiterate, unlearned, no ambition, lazy, thugs, criminals, et cetera …

    So sadly, you hear these labels from top leaders and employers within our own society. The same name brandings they place on other Caribbean nations – to pursue “their” agendas.

    They brand ALL CAYMANIANS like this! And some of our own naive people agree with their rantings.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Anti-caymanians is what they are..

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    • Anonymous says:

      They jump on that band wagon because it’s easier to ride the BS train and still collect your fat check at the end of the month. These tards aren’t interested in change. They’re just pawns who don’t give a damn.

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  23. Anonymous says:

    Lets get a Caymanian Police Commissioner before we get a Caymanian Governor..Franz is a rubber stamp for the UK.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Please be advised that the governor is not a representative of the Cayman people. The governor is appointed to represent the Crown in overseeing the running of this a British territory. That is how it is. That is the job of the Governor or Deputy Governor.

      I am not saying I like it. But facts are facts.

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  24. Anonymous says:

    Foreign persons get free rides over Caymanians. Incredible!  Plus housing, perks, and before you know it, they easily get bank loans and make it well in our country. Then look down on us and say we are a lazy people and all criminals too!

    smh …

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  25. Anonymous says:

    Please hire whichever ones are literate.

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  26. Cym country says:

    May as well I become a criminal!  You have folk that just came here the other day, and they can enjoy executing powers of police over our population, and be eligible for benefits that average Caymanians don’t have.

    Surely, Manderson and the COP must know over 80 applicants applied … please don’t tell me they are not trainable and can become good officers?!

    We need to stop this negativity against our own people!

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    • Anonymous says:

      Cym county …you are missing the point. The last recruit class got us 9 Caymanians. Clearly we need to broaden the field to get us a larger class.

      Both the Commssioner and Manderson has made it clear that caymanians will be given first preference. So what’s the problem?

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      • Anonymous says:

        7:29 pm: the problem is that they have not even assessed the 82, according to this article, yet they are already planning to replace some of the 82 by broadening the criteria. That is what would have to happen, unless their normal class size is being expanded exponentially.

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      • lovemyplace says:

        Am very sorry to say they’re Caymanian’s even if you get papers your not a Caymanian and will never be! your are from where ever your from to be a Caymanian you must be at least 4 generations in my option from one side or another.

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        • Anonymous says:

          It’s the same here. I am a born caymanian and so is my parents but I am not considered a caymanian unless I show my mother’s birth certificate only then I am recognise as a caymanian because I was born in 1978. So basicly what they are telling me is I am a paper caymanian. The government is trying hard to divide the caymanian people.

  27. Anonymous says:

    Thank you acting Governor. Miller and his opposition want caymanians to be given jobs regardless of the whether they can perform the duties. This is exactly what we need to stop doing.

    This is worst than putting inside turf outside.

    The last recruit class gave us a grand total of 9 Caymanians. Clearly we can’t have another class that size.

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  28. Anonymous says:

    ‘The Police have already received 82 applications from Caymanians and Permanent Residents….they have not been assessed’
    . . . and
    ‘Manderson said none of the applicants so far have been determined as “suitable candidates” ‘
    Therein lies the situation . . .
    Contradictory

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  29. Anonymous says:

    Franz for Governor…NOT!!!!

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    • Anonymous says:

      Quite the opposite. It is the ability to make tough, unpopular decisions in the interest of good governance despite political backlash that is a hallmark of a leader.

      Well done, Actg. Governor Manderson.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Franz makes decisions based on what his boss, The FCO tells him to do…He has to do as they say..He is not indebted to us Caymanians in any way..When will you people understand that even if he thinks something is wrong he cannot express his own opinion..It has to be the decision of the FCO and he must follow it…

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  30. Anonymous says:

    Cayman government is making it difficult for Caymanians to secure employment in their own country,”

    That’s right Mr. Miller stand up for our country. What we need is a Caymanian Police Commissioner to start with before even thinking about a Caymanian Governor.
    Mr. Manderson you have been doing a great job so far. Please for the sake of my children future don’t sell out to these bastards.

    CAYMANIAN GOVERMENT FOR CAYMANIAN PEOPLE

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    • Anonymous says:

      @12:59 “Please for the sake of my children future don’t sell out to these bastards.

      CAYMANIAN GOVERMENT FOR CAYMANIAN PEOPLE”

      Ummm where the hell have you been the last oh.. 10 – 15 years and do they have good wifi signal?

      Cayman Government on the whole has sold out to these bastards.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Right here my friend. I know that the goverment has sold out long time now. But I also know that there is a few dedicated hard working caymanians in the government trying to make it better for the caymanian people. We the caymanian people needs to stand up and fight for our island and our culture. They can’t do it alone.

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      • Anonymous says:

        3:05 I have been in Cayman for 50 years and I have no idea what you are talking about.

        No one has sold out Caymanains. Caymanians put in the effort and they get the jobs they deserve. Caymanians don’t want Miller or anyone dumbing down jobs so we can get them. We want to work and earn our jobs.

        CIG just gave two of my family an internship for the summer and ever day the children come home excited about what they have learned.

        Sounds like a good job to me. Thank you acting Governor.

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        • Anonymous says:

          7:34 pm: “dumbing down” jobs? Eh? What are you talking about. Find another battle to fight

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        • Anonymous says:

          Where in my press statement did I ask the COP to lower standards but how do you or anyone else know there are not 15 Caymanians among the 82 applicants that meet the standard. My press release was in response to the article in Friday”s Compass that said the COP had 82 suitable candidates. Why expand the nationality criteria before he has determined that there are not 15 qualified Caymanian applicants.
          I would like to see the basic criteria raised and we recruit better qualified Caymanians from the graduating class at the two high schools and offer them proper training overseas for at least two years in recognized police academes not three months at Governors square.
          Those who excel should be offered the specialist training at either FBI or Scotland yard.
          We also need to reward Caymanian police with better pay and benefits
          Nobody in politics has fought harder for the police than me.
          Ezzard

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    • Anonymous says:

      Not a country.

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  31. Get Real says:

    “Once again, the government is making it difficult for Caymanians to secure employment in their own country,”
    “with 82 applicants Miller said he did not see why the commissioner needed more candidates when the classes are usually made up of around 12 or 15 people.”
    Bullshit. We Caymanians have first priority when it comes to these jobs, but not enough quality candidates are applying. That’s why it has to be opened up to other residents.
    Just because 82 people applied, it doesn’t mean that there are enough who are suitable candidates. I can apply for any job I like but that doesn’t mean I should get it just because I was born here. I hear they need brain surgeons – oh I can give that a try. I’m Caymanian so I should get that job rather than employ any more foreigners.
    If you want a quality police force, and need enough police officers who can tackle the growing crime here then we need the best people for the job and when we can’t get those people from our own, we need to get them from other nationalities.
    We need to realise that most of our unemployed people don’t have jobs for a valid reason, not because they are being discriminated against. Our politicians calling for this sort of nonsense only leads to greater divisions in our country, and people being employed from our population in jobs they aren’t qualified for – which leads in turn to poor public services, poor performance in the police force and ever increasing crime.

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    • Anonymous says:

      12:17 You hit the nail on the head. Unfortunately there isn’t a test to see if you are qualified to vote!

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    • Anonymous says:

      Brilliant comment and all that needs to be said about yet another numbskull xenophobic declaration from members of the Opposition that conveniently avoids basic facts about what the islands need (competent police!).

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    • Anonymous says:

      Get real…first sensible post I have read in a while.

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    • Camana says:

      Are you saying Caymanians have no quality? They can’t perform? They can’t be trained??? You are a dummy!

      Thank you for putting down our people.

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    • Anonymous says:

      12:27 pm: you are assuming that the 82 are not suitable, even if they have met the criteria, the minimum albeit — and remember they have not even yet been assessed.

      If they feel it is necessary to expand the pool from which to choose at this stage,
      This is a reflection of some sort of discrimination at work.

      And that means that some of the 82 will get the shaft.

      As a Caymanian highly qualified in my field, who works hard and produces high quality work, whenever I move for the first time into a heavily expatriate work environment, I still meet the scrutiny of lesser people and still have to prove myself.

      My competence is not automatically assumed as it is for my expatriate counterparts.

      Those are facts, my friend.

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  32. Anonymous says:

    I very rarely agree with Ezzard because sometimes I think he just likes to hear himself talk. This time though, he is right on point. The Irish love to hire their own, it will only be matter of time you will see a whole set of Irish Police officers. The Police force does not need to be anything other than Caymanians. This is just another ploy to bring in their friends to continue the raid on anywhere that has some money or a decent standard living. Right now the level of work place bullying from the Irish, Canadian, English and others is structured beyond belief. Stop giving away the rights of the locals! They do not like us, they are using Cayman.
    Don’t get me wrong, there are some really honest hardworking decent people from these countries. Policing, like taking care of anything, you must have some invested interest in that “thing” you are trying to protect and serve. What makes you think that these people will care about Cayman people? What has history taught us about when people come to the Caribbean or Africa or anywhere else?. Think carefully before you give away the security and protection of the majority citizens of Cayman.

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    • Anonymous says:

      “This is just another ploy to bring in their friends…”, with the full support of your Caymanian deputy governor.

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    • Anonymous says:

      And I as a generational Caymanian would rather have to deal with Irish cops, if not our own, rather than a illiterate, corrupt cop from a third world country!!

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    • Anonymous says:

      “The Police force does not need to be anything other than Caymanians.”

      And if there were enough INTERESTED and QUALIFIED Caymanians applying then this would be possible.

      I still prefer offering these jobs to people who have actually lived here for an extended period and presumably have some ties to the community, than just importing people who have never been here before.

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      • Gt says:

        Yea but … been here for only 4 years ????

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      • Anonymous says:

        1:37pm, their are too many of those “Caymanians”, working as police officers, who have the second job as truck drivers and taxi drivers. Are they indigenous Caymanians ?
        Are they who we need to conveniently make up number?

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  33. Anon says:

    Good move.

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  34. Anonymous says:

    To all those Caymanians that want Franz as governor, be careful what you wish for, you just might get it.

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    • alaw says:

      only the unlearned don’t know that any governor in these Caymans has to answer to
      the queen even if you are Caymanian.

  35. Anonymous says:

    Anyone can see through this. Wait and see, all successful applicants will be those from the second recruitment drive. The first 82 won’t be considered.

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  36. West Bay Premier says:

    As much as I would like to see any Caymanian or expat who have lived on the Island for over 4 years get these Police jobs . The risk factors is far too big to be effective and money well spent I think . They should recruit people who are well trained in Police work with experience and don’t know anyone on the Islands. The Police Force shouldn’t be an employment agency, It should be a Law Enforcement agencies .

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  37. Anonymous says:

    We had excellent Caymanian police officers in the past. What happened to them? Our police force is now being run by officers from 3rd countries who accept the type of criminal activity that is now prevalent in our islands. Clean house!!!

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  38. Anonymous says:

    So, Miller is OK with the police dropping the educational standards further, eh? Based on my experience, they should be raised!!

    It is really important that this place has enough police, and good police. This is basic to any society, and THAT is something that should not be tampered with. The educational criteria as its stands is not too high. Next Ezzard will be saying that the background checks should be less strict, and that Caymanians with criminal records should be allowed in! Watch!

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    • Anonymous says:

      Yup

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    • Anonymous says:

      11:11am, it seems you have a memory lapse. Wasn’t criminals from other countries employed in the RCIPS? Figure that out for yourself. They all come with clean records and vetted, only to find out later on their records are not so clean after all.

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    • Anonymous says:

      I have not asked the COP to drop any standards. He said in Friday’s Compass he had 82 suitable candidates. If the Compass is wrong, correct them not me.
      Ezzard

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      • Anonymous says:

        He did not say that they were suitable candidates. He said they have met the minimum criteria for eligibility. This is what Franz clarified further. They still have to go through all the vetting. According to the Compass you have hundreds of applications in the past that get whittled down to single digits after vetting. In your statement you said that educational criteria should be changed before nationality criteria. Clearly you are telling him to loosen the educational standards so more can pass the vetting. This is a bad idea. The islands want more from the police, not less, and dropping educational standards will NOT get us there.

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      • Anonymous says:

        “If Commissioner Byrne wants to revise his recruitment criteria from the current educational
        standards and to review screening procedures and protocols, he is free to do so, but the basic nationality and residency requirement should not be tampered with,” Miller stated

        –hmmm, “revise” the current educational standards… aren’t you implying for him to drop the standards???

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      • Anonymous says:

        If that is you Ezzard, why don’t you concentrate on ridding NS of the drunks, drug addicts and general idiots that are so prolific in this area. Why don’t you get our roads repaired, (Water Cay) protect locals and tourists alike from burglars and stop the mayhem caused by drunk revellers leaving Rum Point on a Sunday evening?
        Instead of rabble rousing the intellectually deficient who can’t tell the difference between a grandstanding oaf and an honest advocate when they see one, get on with sorting out your failed constituency instead of dictating to those who hold real careers with real responsibility. Oh yea, and have real qualifications, the skills and experience to know who is the best candidate for the job based upon their suitability to fulfill the role and not simply nationality.

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        • Anonymous says:

          Blame Mackeva,Alden and the rest of the bad mind politicians that dont want to see the eastern districts improve. Their only concern is DART wallet.

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