Another visitor dies after snorkelling trip

| 22/05/2018 | 27 Comments

(CNS): A 57-year-old man who was visiting the Cayman Islands from the United States has became the seventh tourist to die in local waters so far this year. On Saturday evening, 19 May, emergency personnel were called to East End after the man had encountered difficulties while snorkelling in the area. He was helped to shore by members of the public nearby and then taken to the Cayman Islands Hospital. However, he lost consciousness and was later pronounced dead. 

The as yet unidentified man brings the death toll of visitors to seven and comes less than a week after an 83-year-old man, also from the United States, died during a snorkelling trip at Stingray City.

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Category: Local News

Comments (27)

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  1. Anonymous says:

    Condolences to the family!
    People die everyday. This is not the fault of Cayman waters. Water does tire people out pretty quickly. It is not an uncommon occurrence for people to die doing what they enjoy, in this case snorkeling.

  2. West Bay Premier says:

    What Cayman Islands DOT needs to do is make good/smart regulations and enforce them to the fullest, and that will stop alot of these tragedies .

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    • Anonymous says:

      I’m not sure you can legislate against people having heart attacks.

    • Shhhhhhhhhh. says:

      And West Bay Premier @ 6.11pm please share your wisdom, and tell us what “good/smart regulations” do you believe will prevent visitors who are not in good shape from drowning in a free and democratic country’s coastal waters. I am sure the government would appreciate your specific and appropriate input on this!!!

  3. Anonymous says:

    The sad reality, regardless of the cause, is that a family lost someone they love. Friends have to say goodbye to someone they care about. A vacation that likely was supposed to be an amazing adventure ended up a terrible tragedy . We may never know the circumstances that preceded the event but it is important that people know the risks that are involved and respect the power of the ocean. I pray that his family and friends find peace as they grieve .

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  4. Anonymous says:

    XXXXX

    Bet CNS won’t publish this post!

    CNS: Your comment was absolutely fine and would have been posted without a second thought…. except I never post a comment that ends with “Bet CNS won’t publish this post!” I actually can’t see any reason why you would write that. It wasn’t controversial and not particularly interesting.

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    • Shhhhhhhhhh. says:

      Ha ha Anonymous @ 3.56 you lost your bet! You are a guest on this forum. Do not be rude or challenging to your host. Be Cayman kind.

  5. Anonymous says:

    The trend being they are all over 50. People need to know they aren’t capable of doing what they once did as teens and young adults. Know your limits and be cautious in the sea!

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    • Anonymous says:

      10:29 Amen to that. I was still doing 200′ air dives in my early-50s. In fact I did 220′ on my 54th birthday off the wall in Grand Turk with no problems and the whole of Truk Lagoon two years later. But I stopped scuba diving at 61 after realising that it was about time to slow down a bit. As the famous movie saying goes, ‘A man’s got to know his limitations.’

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    • Anonymous says:

      And your point is?

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      • Shhhhhhhhhh. says:

        To 9.14 am. Duuuh? Obviously Cayman does not have a monopoly on this problem, and it is basically a matter of unhealthy visitors testing their bodies beyond the limit. Therefore not Cayman’s fault or liability. It is an accepted fact that visitors wishing to do a dive lie about their health, or, are not even aware that they are at risk. I hope that was of help to you. Smile!

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        • Anonymous says:

          . . . and Tourists could be drunk, under the influence, hungover, dehydrated.
          . . . vacation-related issues affecting health.

    • West Bay Premier says:

      Why are you concerned with what is happening in Hawaii , but not concerned about what is happening in Cayman Islands and can only reference what is happening in another Country ? I guess that you have heard the expression “mind your own business “.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Really?? Neither of you lot see the significance/similarities of deaths in vacation places?????
        LOL
        Cannot make this up…

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  6. Anonymous says:

    On average, nearly one tourist dies a week in Hawaii, according to a special report by Honolulu Civil Beat, typically while engaged in common vacation activities such as swimming, snorkeling and hiking. Many more suffer serious injuries, including spinal cord damage. https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/hawaii-tourist-deaths_us_572d512fe4b096e9f09197c9

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    • Anonymous says:

      @ 8:18 So????

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      • Anonymous says:

        Calm down and read some of the links that have been posted. Nobody is saying that Hawaii and Cayman are the same…
        Jeez
        It’s like someone peed in your Weetabix and you take to CNS to vent your anger!

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        • Anonymous says:

          You are too funny, “someone peed in weetabix” I have no proof but I believe that some of these deaths could be attributed to ” having one too many” before going into the water. Just saying………

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    • Anonymous says:

      8:18 And conditions in Hawaii are totally different from the Cayman Islands.

      According to friends of mine who went there three years ago they experience very rapid daily weather changes and conditions are unpredictable. In addition many of the sites are completely unsheltered.

      Consider this – The highest point on Maui is just over 10,000′ whereas the highest point on Grand Cayman is 60′ and that has a huge impact on the local weather conditions. You’re simply not comparing like for like.

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      • Shhhhhhhhhh. says:

        Point is 12.10 pm the tourists are pretty much the same bunch of over fifties, who are not in good shape, and who may not even be aware that they have a health issue at all, until they are challenged by fatigue, currents, etc. The critical factor is health, not the coastline, that is why the numbers are similar.

  7. Anonymous says:

    Swim at your own risk posted everywhere. on airport walls, plane magazines and port entries. cant be responsible for out of shape and old people ricking their lives

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    • Anonymous says:

      8:16 Behind the media hype the stats I have from Hawaii don’t actually identify full-face snorkel masks as a significant causal factor in fatalities but there are issues with them. The obvious one is the vast number of cheap plastic knocks offs being sold. Don’t people realise that paying $9.99 for a style of mask that should retail in the $50-$90 range is a bit iffy?

      Aside from that, I’ve worked in full-face diving masks (FFM) and the obvious problem I can see with these snorkel masks is the bale out is anything goes wrong. With a snorkel you just spit it out but an FFM has to be removed completely, quickly and in a controlled manner – can’t see a novice who has just inhaled or swallowed a load of seawater and is choking doing that. I just don’t see this new snorkeling toy as a safe ‘plug in and go’ option and maybe people are now paying the price.

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  8. West Bay Premier says:

    My condolences to his family, and may he rest in peace .
    Are we believing yet that all of these tragic deaths , are going to have an impact on us and our Tourism , where is the government and DOT voice on all these deaths that are happening in the Island haven’t heard a word yet from them . Does anyone care about the safety of the tourist ?
    i am here to help , but I am not going to talk to block wall .

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    • Shhhhhhhhhh. says:

      Mr. West Bay Premier @ 9.10 pm maybe you could be specific and suggest what your govt. should be saying. We all await with bated breath, or with our full face masks on!

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