Appeal court jails free man in cop assault case

| 18/04/2018 | 132 Comments
Cayman Islands Court of Appeal

Seth Watler

(CNS): Seth O’Neil Watler broke down in court Wednesday and had to be assisted down the stairs to the cells after he was jailed by the Cayman Islands Court of Appeal when the panel overturned a ten-month suspended sentence and replaced it with a year in prison. Watler pleaded guilty last October to assaulting a senior police officer at the scene of a road crash earlier the same month. When he was sentenced in December, based on a range of mitigating factors, the judge suspended the jail term. But the crown appealed, claiming the sentence was unduly lenient.

Watler had admitted swearing at and then punching Superintendent Pete Lansdown, who was knocked out when he fell down and hit his head on the pavement. He sustained a cut to his lip and head and also broke a rib as a result of the assault.

During the appeal hearing Wednesday, the judges agreed with Deputy Director of Public Prosecutions Patrick Moran and said that the sentence was “inadequate” and suspending it was wrong. Although they accepted that the judge in the case had “approached the sentence with care”, she had overlooked the aggravating factor that the victim was a police officer who was carrying out his duties.

The appeal court found that a more appropriate starting point for the sentencing exercise would have been around two years. With the discount for Watler’s early plea, the court said that this would have led to a term of around 15 months. But given the question of double jeopardy and the stress and anxiety caused as Watler has been a free man for some four months, they found that they could reduce that term to twelve months. But the judges ordered that Watler should begin serving the jail time immediately.

It took the appeal court around an hour to deliver the judgment, during which time Watler wept openly in the dock and became increasingly distressed. He broke down as he was taken into custody.

See related story on CNS here.

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Category: Local News

Comments (132)

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  1. Anonymous says:

    This is someone’s son. Could be one of your own one day, let’s not be self-righteous.

    I always said we are all capable, of doing bad, harming others, recklessness, idiocy and on and on. What is important is that we learn from our mistakes.

    This young man now has time to do just that. Learn.

    No-body is perfect, and having tattoos or a mixed pit bull puppy (because that’s not a full breed pit bull in that picture) doesn’t make you a bad person nor does it make you a criminal.

    He made a mistake and he now has to serve a year in prison. Let’s be honest, when he gets out, he won’t have much of a chance at this life again. No-one will hire him, no-one will ever let him live this mistake down.

    The article implies he showed remorse in court and felt guilty for his behaviour. He also realizes that he really doesn’t want to go to jail. But it’s too late, his inability to properly express his emotions have cost him his freedom and now caused him to have a limited future.

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    • Anonymous says:

      The victim is also someone’s son. So what? Enough excuses.

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    • Rick says:

      All true, when you read comments on here a lot of folks came down on him and are quick to judge him. We all make mistakes and learn from it.

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  2. A says:

    Fish Dat !

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  3. Cayman Biting Ants says:

    Really sad day when we have those in society who believe law enforcement is always right and justified in its action or is it our own prejudices and bias we are trying to justify. If that be the case why do we need judges or the courts to mediate or judge such matters.

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    • Anonymous says:

      You can’t blame the sheep for not questioning authority; they are only meant to follow orders and comply.

  4. It is a simple matter
    Respect for the Law
    For example:
    Your father has an argument with his young son over a water bill that was no paid and the service was sudpended(father authority)
    The son did not agreed with the father and punches his father because he felt that the father should paid the bill and no him.
    What would you?
    Would you send your son to his room
    Would you tell your son leave the house and move out immediately
    Would you call the police or
    Would you just do not pay any mind because he is just a young man. Hence his quick temper

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    • Anonymous says:

      I’d punch my son back even harder – discipline and respect are sadly missing in today’s society. Starts at home simple as and that’s a worldwide problem.

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    • Uncivil Servant says:

      This, from one of our finest Deputies, tells you all you need to know.

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  5. Anonymous says:

    I was not there at the incident. But punching anyone, is unwarranted. And a cop even more so. Kinda hard to feel sorry for him. Unless he was defending himself. And i mean, someone was swinging first. You just don’t punch people.

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  6. Anonymous says:

    Pretty sure the appeal judges did not enjoy sending Watler to jail. Pretty sure the Watler family did not enjoy seeing their kid going to jail. Pretty sure the assaulted officer did not enjoy the grievous bodily harm. Pretty sure many commentators below are enjoying this story, and are using it as currency to promote their own fears and bigotries. Such opinions have broken many other Caribbean communities. Rising crime will never break us. But silence in the face of fear and bigotry will break us to pieces, long before our children realise how badly we let them down.

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  7. Anonymous says:

    Why is everyone commenting about him crying? The majority of the ones making comments probably cry if they get a splinter. People cry for different reasons. Whatever he did he did and is now doing his time. Why must people kick a man when he is down? For such a god fearing country they sure have a lot of hypocrites.

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    • Jg says:

      Punching an Officer takes alot of balls, if you dont have a mental disability doesnt matter how drunk you are, you see the uniform and know not to do those things. So crying proves hes not what he portrayed that night. Yes its unfortunate but thats the consequences. Anyone that hits a police officer is an idiot to me, because I know the consequences. Would you touch an electric fence with a clear sign saying you will get shocked?

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    • Naya Boy says:

      They are commenting because it kind of turns them on when they can justify their vicious hatefulness and vilify others until it happens to them or a family member then they have a mental breakdown in disbelief that it could possibly happen to them.

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  8. Anonymous says:

    Da wha u get likkle fop.

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  9. Anonymous says:

    This boy has an attitude problem that needs to be addressed.
    Jail will take care if that.
    And take that pitbull away from him. Like I said, attitude problem.
    Typical caymanian youth.

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    • Anonymous says:

      What does the pit bull have to do with anything? The dog has nothing to do with the matter at hand. A specific breed of a canine doesn’t have anything to do with the person and it doesn’t define who the person is.
      You sound like a typical, ignorant caymanian who always has to put their mouth in something talk nonsense. Pull your head out of your ass cheeks and think before you speak.
      Yeah i’m caymanian too so don’t come back and say anything about me being a foreigner.

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      • Anonymous says:

        What does this have to do with being a foreigner or Caymanian? You say that the breed of canine has nothing to do with the person and doesn’t define the person…Really? You don’t think that Watler is trying to convey a certain image posing with that pit bull and his wanna be gangsta tats? Breed has everything to do with it. He’s trying to play little tough boy, until he got his a$$ jailed and started crying like a two year old…

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      • Anonymous says:

        pit bulls are a symbol used by these idiots to pretend they are kingpins or something. Perhaps the poster meant that the idiot doesn’t take care of the dog, pull your head out for a second

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      • Anonymous says:

        5.51pm—–sorry that’s what you think!!!! That the dog has nothing to do with it… symbolic !!!!! “Bad boy” !!!!

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      • Anonymous says:

        5 51 pm Pit Bulls are against the law to have , so it has something to do with it, he was breaking the law by having that kind of dog, so you should think before you speak, ok.

    • J says:

      Typical racist bigot?

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  10. Anonymous says:

    You really have to be some kind of stupid if you really think physically harming a child is the only way they will learn. How about using your intelligence instead. Where do you think this young man learned that hitting another person was acceptable? Try and education yourself on what using a strap really does to the psyche of a child. I will bet he saw this at home first and now it’s normal behavior

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    • Shhhhhhhhhh. says:

      Is that what he might respect now? Bring back the cat! This kid is a lune.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Now in my mid 40s, got strapped at least twice a week at primary school, yet to assault another adult, let alone a police officer. Take your apologist bullshit elsewhere.

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  11. Anonymous says:

    Yes questioning the judges yet when foreign nationals here rape and defile little children they are given 8 month sentences don’t see any appeals being filed on their behalf Caymanian pay close attention on how justice is being dispensed now in our courts.

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  12. Anonymous says:

    Pretty alarming the comments on here. Is the offender likely due the lawful repercussions recently handed down? – absolutely. What causes concern is that it wasn’t the young mans fault the judge was perhaps leinienent in the initial sentencing. It was the system and the injustices by its operative nature that it will always frame.

    So let’s take a break haters, let’s not jump on the wagon to tar the young man of escaping due justice the first time around, – instead express outrage or better yet constructive criticism that will prevent such occurrences happing in the future.

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    • Anonymous says:

      I call BS on the hater thing. The thug has gotten what he deserved the first time. Thanks to the prosecutors for not giving up.

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  13. Anonymous says:

    Seth my friend you gotta man up and quit that crying before entering NW doors..keep your head up, serve your time and when you are freed go on with your life. Other people on this island have done much worse yet society wants to act like GOD and say who should die and who should be given this or that.

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  14. Anonymous says:

    Something has definitely gone horribly wrong with our young people and their lack of respect for authority…you hear of it in the schools also. There, however, the parents are often threatening as well so maybe it’s a general problem with today’s society in Cayman.

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    • Concerned says:

      Yes you are correct that our young people show lack of respect for authority & parents. How can we expect anything different when our schools can no longer discipline our children & parents can no longer use the strap as punishment. Children know now that they can call 911 on their parents & all the drama that is involved with that. My parents used the belt on me & I am a better person for it today. We did what we were told to do otherwise we knew what was comming. It caused us to have fear & respect for them and our elders & people like the police. This stupidity about taking away “things” as a form of punishment is not working in our society today. We need to change some of the rules. Spare the rod, spoil the child. Can’t bend a branch once it’s grown.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Never once, no one in my family needed to beat up a child for discipline. You are a nasty person to not be able to find a better way to punish children than beating them. No excuses for child abuse…

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        • Anonymous says:

          to 4:07 chastisement is far different from abuse my dear ,,and I highly recomen the record of the good book .,you outta sit around the schools for a day ,. You will soon know the difference of what home they are coming from .

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        • West Bay Premier says:

          Anonymous 4:07 pm , I take it that you are not over 30 years of age . Then you don’t know much about before Governments started making laws and taking away the belt and strap from Parents and Teachers .
          If you had seen the difference between the kids of yesterday , you will agree that Government interference in the way that kids were disciplined is the problem why kid are the way they are today .

          I will give you a little example of what I am talking about . A few days ago I was in the grocery store , and this Lady spoke very softly three times and asked her boys to bring the cart and they ignored her , and I spoke in a higher tone of voice jokenly and said boys ya hear yo mama talking to ya , then they moved to take her the cart . Do you see that Parents are scared to even raise their voice to their kids because child abuse comes in different forms according to the child abuse laws . if that was in the olden days the kids would have got a hand up the side of their face and learned that when your parent spoke once you did what they said . You don’t see that much today when parents speak once that its obey .

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        • Concerned says:

          Nowhere in my conversation did I mention to beat up a child! There is a difference between straping a child in the hand or on the legs than beating them up. You should NEVER slap a child in the head or face.

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      • Anonymous says:

        So the only way to raise a child and make them a good person is beating them?

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        • West Bay Premier says:

          Anonymous 10:00pm , no when the child don’t want to obey the parent command the first time , then the second time for the belt as a different approach to discipline the child , but you can’t do that today by law is the problem .

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    • Hafoo says:

      Caymankind??

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  15. Kadafe says:

    Very good, although some of the officers do not display the best attitudes some of the time you can simply record their badge number and go make a report to the on duty inspector about it. There is no excuse to strike a officer of the law that is simply doing their duties. Sentence should have been at least two full years for good effect.

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  16. Anonymous says:

    Typical thug reaction, cry like a wimp when upcommings come their way.

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  17. Hope Someone Feeds The Dog says:

    Hahahahahahaha. Hahahaha. Hahahahahahaha.

    Oh, call me a doctor, my sides are splitting.

    What an utterly cowardly arsewipe of a human being.

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  18. Anonymous says:

    Finally some justice. Now, look through other cases and I’m sure you’ll find many others that are the same. Way to lenient. Quit letting these thugs out on leniency or technicality.

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  19. West Bay Premier says:

    Good example by the Judges , no wonder they can burn up Police cars and punch and knock out Police . The place is gone to the dogs and criminals .

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  20. annoyed with ci gov says:

    WHAT A MESS!!! the prison is over crowded as it is even the new prison boss said so himself a few weeks back. This man gets 1 year for a drunken mistaken punching someone yet there are people waling around stabbing and cutting and assaulting people all the time and get off with probation. Cayman ISlands Courts are so full of bs along with out worthless RCIPS.

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    • pooh_cay@yahoo.com says:

      Ah he didn’t just punch someone! He punched a police officer and caused bodily harm and we know he did this because he plead guilty. Children are taught that every action has a reaction are you trying to say this adult missed that lesson in class. He was lucky with the first judge but there is a thing called Karma and it came back for him. Hopefully he learns a lesson and stop acting dumb and blaming it on booze. If you cant hold you liquor don’t consume it

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    • Anonymous says:

      legalize ganja and you will see alot of room in the prison. Save millions in tax revenue.

      Everyone always says god this god that. Who grew marijuana/ganja. God did. So, are we saying god did something wrong?

      You abuse anything it’s bad for you. Salt, sugar, you can even die from drinking too much water. Same goes with ganja. Proven medical applications. But we are so paranoid as a culture of drugs. That we ban something that has a near zero death rate. Yet alcohol claims hundreds of thousands of lives a year.

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  21. Anonymous says:

    I can’t say he handled the situation properly, but take a look at how many Police officers have also been charged with assault on the citizens they have sworn to protect and serve. This is a problem for both sides.

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  22. Anonymous says:

    small victory for justice in the cayman islands…

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    • Anonymous says:

      They need to try to get it right the first time. He was wrong and deserved a stiffer sentence from the very start. To now turn around and throw him in jail should be a violation of his human rights. Until these things start to affect people closer to us we can’t fathom these things. Imagine he pleaded guilty from the jump.

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  23. Wooster the Rooster says:

    Who judges the judges?. In this case there was a glaring error. Time we had a system for reviewing the performance of those sitting in judgement.

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    • Anonymous says:

      In this case, the Appeals court Judged the Judge

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      • Wooster the Rooster says:

        !.52pm yes as you say, the Appeals Court in this case. But what about sentences that are not appealed and judges that consistently err in their judgement. Who judges their performance?.

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    • Anonymous says:

      i don’t know who judges the judges…..all i think the coast guard police’s the police

  24. anonymous says:

    Let this be a message to all those who have no respect for police officers doing their duty, as I have recently observed myself. Truth be told, some of these punks are from countries where their actions would have resulted in deadly force but they come here and act as if they are above the law, which’s not to absolve our local grown thugs from blame either and in this case this was one of us – parenteral upbringing?. The unfortunate thing, as can be seen from the division in votes is that this is a growing and present threat to the Cayman Islands as a place where the rule of law is respected and citizens are generally good, decent and caring to one and another. The road rage is another subject!

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  25. Anon says:

    So disgusted to see the quality if comments here… from people who were not at the scene, and only going off what the media is allowed to provide to the general public.

    There is so much truth that continues to be withheld from the Cayman public, especially with the respect to the unprecedented level of corruption that takes place within the RCIPS; and lets not talk about the outside influences which lead to their corrupt behavior, that is the real reason why many Caymanians choose not to entwine themselves within the RCIPS!!!!! CORRUPTION!!!!!

    VERY FEW young Caymanians stay with the RCIPS, because they find out all too soon that the truth is, you either become apart of the mess or leave… no cleaning it up buddy!!

    Looking past all else, the real issue here is the “system”. I am not condoning what happened to the officer, but under this and let it sink in; young Caymanian men have targets on their back. ANYTHING that can ne done to destroy Caymanian families and bring shame to their names, it is being done. All it takes is ONE mistake, ONE wrong decision ONE damn spliff… all it takes is an officer provoking you and BOOM!!! Jail time. But then again, if you aren’t a of the comfortable earth Caymanian, you would not understand this.

    I leave with this, all the cocaine sniffing expats who run their disgusting sex rings, who have “legitimate businesses” here, go target them RCIPS, that is where the real crime is… money laundering, amongst other things.

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    • Anonymous says:

      He hit a cop. Enough said.

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    • Anonymous says:

      If that happened in the US, he would have fallen down the stairs a few times. He is lucky he was arrested here.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Thank you for sharing this. Even though people do not want to hear it, this is the truth.

      We have a huge problem with Cocaine in this Country. But because the people who buy and use this drug are usually wealthy and hold esteemed positions of employment in the Country, the powers that be turn a blind eye. Whereas the “crack-heads” who are almost always poor people, are targeted.

      So we see an effort to lock away a crack-head, but none to lock away a “coke-head”.

      Double standards all day, Cayman style.

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    • Anon2 says:

      Anon

      I’m a born and raised Caymanian.

      Do you really believe punching a Superintendent of Police, knocking him to the ground causing him to go unconscious, breaking his rib as a result of the assault … is a mistake?!

      In your words you stated, “All it takes is ONE mistake, ONE wrong decision.” I understand wrong decision, but how can you say this was a mistake???

      You are 100% responsible for your actions.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Lol. Sex rings? What have you heard? If you have info then maybe pass it on to the police instead of insinuating crimes based on some conspiracy heard at the domino table.

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    • Born expatriate says:

      7.29am You surely are a born Caymanian with your racist xenophobia.Why do Caymanians flock to the fire service and not the police, simply because they prefer to sit in front of the TV most of the day and do not have to study law and chase Caymanian drug addicts.How many police have been convicted of corruption, we see it in the Immigration and Customs departments which are 100% Caymanian, so what do you think will happen if somehow Caymanians are able to supply all our police officers.
      As for sex rings, what is more disgusting than all these Caymanian paedophiles who prey on their own family members and get away with it to preserve family reputations.
      This was not a case of “one damn spliff”, but a case of disgustiing violence against a police officer doing his duty, who suffered serious injuries as a result.
      There have been a number of attacks on the police and their property and this must end, and jail sentences such as this will send out a strong message to Mr Watler and others of the same ilk.

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      • Anonymous says:

        @ Born expatriate: you should ask why the fire service hires Caymanians on a whim but not the RCIPS.

        You ask the questions so you can get your own xenophobic response.

        Whilst I DO NOT agree with damaging anyone’s property or harming anyone, your broad generalizations of BORN Caymanians are not warranted and indeed racist.

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        • Wooster the Rooster says:

          11.57am Not racist and not broad generalisations, but facts which born Caymanians do not like being faced with. Where are the facts in 7.29am’s comments, let him/her subtantiate the claims of the “unprecedented rate of corruption within the RCIPS” and the “cocaine sniffing expats running their disgusting sex rings”. Where are the prosecutions for these claimed offenders?, they certainly exist in the Immigration and Customs departments.
          As for the Fire Service ask why the imported Chief has been unable to train a successor despite his training background.

    • Anonymous says:

      Sorry this isn’t about expats. Stop finding excuses for bad behavior. This kid did something really stupid and violent and now he must accept responsibility. Period.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Should be charged for the illegal dog too. Lock his punk ass up yes!

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      • Anonymous says:

        I wonder how man expats would be locked up also for owning an “illegal” breed that they probably adopted. Just saying, the dog has nothing to do with this guy punching a police officer, the dog did not make him do it. He got what he deserved not leave the poor dog alone! Sounds like you would be happier to see all pit bull mixed dogs euthanized.

    • Anonymous says:

      If you have any real knowledge of corruption within the RCIP then go to Deputy Governor Franz Manderson and tell what you know. If not then YOU are part of the problem.

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    • Anonymous says:

      I completely fail to see what your comments have to do with this case, stop muddying the waters. He deserves all he gets and should think himself lucky it wasn’t longer.

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    • Anonymous says:

      You must be one of the parents of some relative of this disrespectful boy who attacked the police officer! There is absolutely nothing you can say to justify what this disgrace of a human being has done. YOU and him and all alike are what’s wrong with the society. Grow the hell up!

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    • Anon. says:

      I agree that most commenters, if not all, were not at the scene but let us agree on the following facts:
      1. A police officer in uniform while conducting his duties was assaulted by this man.
      2. Even if you have proof of corruption within the RCIPS, was this particular officer part of that corruption? Even if he was, again, irrelevant with him being assaulted at the scene of an accident. You DO NOT assault police officers.
      3. You made reference to “outside influences which lead to corrupt behavior”, what does that have to do with this particular incident involving this particular police officer being assaulted while carrying out his duties?
      4. Whether there was some history between this person and the officer in question at the time of the assault is irrelevant, you DO NOT assault a police officer.

      So despite your rant about corruption, outside influences, in this case, the initial trial judge sent the wrong message, that you can assault a police officer and get a suspended sentence

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      • Anonymous says:

        He was not in uniform

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        • Anon. says:

          Show me where it says that.
          This article says “she had overlooked the aggravating factor that the victim was a police officer who was carrying out his duties” and all the other articles previously said he was carrying out his duties so which traffic police have you seen that attends a scene to carry out his duties and are not in uniform?

        • Anon. says:

          Now you are just making up lies.
          He knew full well he was a police officer.
          Stop trying to justify this little fop actions.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Theres a lot that goes on within the RCIPS. do you blame them with all the hazzle they got to deal with on the streets comment below. just keeps going around around. never ending circle of hatred and us against them. just take a look at the RCIPS replacing all the intoxylizer machines on the hush hush…they are been replaced because the machines they were using were old very old, never maintained to the manufacturers specs for reliable tests to be done ever, they never functioned correctly and the machines were never operated correctly manufacturers specs for reliable tests. a big mess that is been cleaned up on hush hush…this all has to stop

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    • Anonymous says:

      7:29 so the police, lawyers for the crown, judge and jury are all wrong you say and the thug is not?

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    • Anonymous says:

      Geez – You’re crazy!!

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    • linda reise says:

      Wow – you really have lost the plot!
      He knocked out a policeman, of course he should go to jail

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    • Anonymous says:

      What a load of ‘poor me’ dung

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    • Anonymous says:

      (poster likely member of thuggish shit familes)

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    • Anonymous says:

      Is there corruption in the RCIPs, yes I believe there is, just too many things they let slide, including the lock up fiasco and one or two others..and Governor, that is your remit to resolve, along with the ACC. Your rant, on the other hand smacks of desperation. I work with some great Caymanians and they never seem to face these issues. I assume because they don’t get involved with the people who are more prone to criminal activity.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Ok, thanks Louis Farrakhan.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Unfortunately a lot of people don’t realize that a simple punch like this could knock someone out, lead them to falling and hitting their head and then dying. It would then be a murder charge so people need to see this as a serious offence, not just a punch. And at the end of the day it was an on duty police officer, no matter what the police did, you should know not to react this way, deal with it in the courts. This is how people get shot.

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    • Black power BLM says:

      Tax evaders give the island more of a bad name than the criminals because everytime you hear some one on tv talk about the cayman islands its always about rich american tax evaders and corporations who hide their wealth and laundering money on the island making people around call it a “tax haven” so whos the real criminal?

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    • Kace Inplace says:

      Uhm. I thought you were going to lay down the truth about the situation. Look like u be powdering ur nose ya self

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    • Right ya so says:

      So say something. Report them.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Is there anything, any single thing that isn’t ‘the expats’ fault on this island?

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    • Anonymous says:

      racist much?

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  26. Anonymous says:

    ‘Watler wept openly in the dock and became increasingly distressed.’ LOL, not so tough now are we? As the saying goes, ‘If you can’t do the time don’t do the crime.’

    He’s just lucky RCIPS play by the rules because there are more a few places not too far from here where the cops will respond to an assault like this with, at the least, a damn good kicking.

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  27. Anonymous says:

    Bad boy now or cry baby?

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  28. Anonymous says:

    Not enough.

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  29. Anonymous says:

    Love the picture tough guy. Shades, tattoo, mean dog….and then you weep like a baby in court. Do they have pacifiers in NW?

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  30. Anonymous says:

    Yes you punk. Cry baby. Not bad man now

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    • Anonymous says:

      You sound real tough over the internet, you wouldn’t say that to his face though. keep quiet.

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      • Anonymous says:

        What he did was wrong. I do not think his emotions necessarily had to be broadcasted in the media. I also believe that a lot of “ bad men” and women for that matter, shed tears when they realize they are going to be locked up and their freedom and future is disappearing before their eyes. Not justifying what he did, as I said, it was wrong, but it is a travesty when one’s life goes in the direction of prison instead of what it could/ should have been.

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      • Keyboard Warrior4life says:

        Says “anonymous”. Big lolz

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    • Anonymous says:

      I hope people see how a picture paints a thousand words.

      He’s Caucasian, with tattoos, some cheap shades and a mixed-breed pit bull puppy (A.K.A. a mutt). So naturally, we all say, ye take that punk, you wanna be a gangster! Blah blah…..tell me when does a boy become a man? At what age has he learnt it all?

      Just hope he survives the year in HMP and learns how to avoid trouble in the future.

  31. Anonymous says:

    Good enough for him!! He deserved a longer sentence. Who do these scumbags think they are. The law must be upheld or this island will go down the pan. It’s fastly approaching there now.
    As an ex Police Officer of RCIPS the public don’t know the half of what officers have to put up with. The assaults, spitting in your face, foul language, kicking and verbal abuse. The list is endless. It’s not an easy job as one might think. That’s why not many Caymanians apply to join only criticise the Force. Take a step back public, with all those unlicensed firearms in daily use out there spare a thought for our officers risking their lives for you all.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Liar and troll this situation got out control because the UK let get out control it was in their interest to do so.

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      • Anonymous says:

        Conspiracy theory much?
        Todays default human reaction is “must blame someone else for everything wrong in my life”.
        Sad.

  32. Anonymous says:

    Tres amusant.

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  33. Anonymous says:

    He will be out in 3-4 months

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  34. StopTheCrime says:

    How could the original judge be so blind to let this animal out into the public in the first place? Assaulting a police officer? Once again, lenient sentences are part of the reason why crime has spiked on this beautiful island.

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    • Billions says:

      This was an attack on the community and authority. Weeping shows how pathetic this snowflake generation is….. reactionary and childish!

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  35. Anonymous says:

    Not such a bad man now, huh? Serve your damn time.

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  36. Anonymous says:

    Many tears could have been avoided had the young man been courteous and respectful. Lock him up.

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  37. Anonymous says:

    The trial judge was obviously too lenient. This is more like it, just barely. Interesting that CNS minimized the injuries in the article.

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    • Anonymous says:

      This is the third or forth article on this issue, if you would like to read about the injuries in detail go to the preceding articles , or does CNS have to give you the entire history of the island for you to be happy with their work?

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      • Anonymous says:

        Well, fortunately I was able to read about the very serious injuries in the Compass article. Those injuries are what this is all about aren’t they?

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  38. Anonymous says:

    “the victim was a police officer who was carrying out his duties.”

    It shouldn’t matter WHO the victim was! Assault is assault! Jail should have been given the first time…

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    • Anonymous says:

      Yes but when you assault the people who are meant to enforce law you have an even worse problem on your hands. Complete disregard for the law.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Fantastic to see the amount of thumbs down in a commentary where obviously law abiding and respectful citizens condone adequate punishment for violence towards one of our police officers , its about a 60/40 split. Shows you the attitude out there to expect and illustrates the general problem Cayman faces.

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      • Lockdown in Chino says:

        Yes said the trolls who create Cambridge Analytica but making law abiding citizens into criminals because of injustice doesn’t bode well for cayman now does it

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      • Narcisso Clarke says:

        The mere fact you are carrying out an analysis of such data indicates the sinister nature of your post and the artificial amount of false positive responses but their no amount thumbs up that can justified the real truth out here on these streets.

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