Premier calls for more say over police

| 14/03/2018 | 76 Comments
Crime in the Cayman Islands

Premier Alden McLaughlin in the Legislative Assembly, 14 March 2018

(CNS): Premier Alden McLaughlin has again called for more power sharing for the political arm of government when it comes to the policy and strategy of the RCIPS and tackling crime in the Cayman Islands. Speaking publicly for the first time about the recent spike in crime, McLaughlin told his legislative colleagues Wednesday that government was responsible for voting the cash the police needs but the time had come for elected officials to have more involvement on strategy and for the National Security Council to function as intended rather than just a “talking shop”.

In a lengthy statement about the investment in the fight against crime, the development of a border control agency, social programmes to prevent young people going down the wrong path, and improved rehabilitation of offenders, the premier stressed the need for the elected government to be allowed a greater role in national security matters.

“Our role needs to extend beyond merely voting funds for the police,” McLaughlin said. “The elected government needs a significant voice in strategic decision-making relating to national security matters. That was what was contemplated by the constitutional provision that created the National Security Council in the 2009 constitution, but that is not what has occurred in practice.”

He spoke of a shared responsibility between the governor and government and called for the National Security Council to function in the way it was contemplated, “as the National Security Cabinet of the Cayman Islands – and not merely as a talk-shop”.

He said politicians were held accountable by the public for reducing crime but the only control they have is the budget.

“We get to vote money but we do not have real control of national security issues,” McLaughlin said. He called again for the British government to rethink the position of the governor of the Cayman Islands having full responsibility for the RCIPS and to consider a police authority to allow for the sharing of the elected arm in strategic police matters.

Governor Helen Kilpatrick had said in her throne speech that she welcomed conversation on the issue, the premier said, but now Cayman was at a critical juncture, where national security issues are increasingly a concern to the people and visitors. McLaughlin stated that in more recent conversations with the Office of the Governor he had urged that the National Security Council be operated as was envisaged when the Constitution was written.

“That is, as a decision-making body whose decisions or ‘advice’ on ‘non-operational or staffing’ matters regarding the RCIPS the governor would be obligated to take. Where this advice is not followed, then the governor will be obliged to report this back to the NSC at the next meeting,” he said.

He noted that he had asked for more formalised proceedings of the NSC, with regular monthly meetings where papers are submitted by members for consideration, similar to the process followed in Cabinet.

“I would expect that the NSC agenda would be agreed jointly between me as premier and the governor. This should help the NSC become more focused on strategic and policy matters and take meaningful decisions.”

This would provide elected members — the premier, the leader of the opposition and two government ministers — “with some real say into non-operational policing matters”, McLaughlin said. “It is through us, the elected members and the private sector representatives on the NSC, that the security concerns of the everyday man, woman and business owner in this country will be taken to the NSC meeting table for consideration and decision.”

The premier said that with a new governor arriving, this was an opportune time for a reset regarding the NSC and for the UK’s representative and the elected members of the Legislative Assembly to share authority for internal security.

McLaughlin listed a number of things his government was doing to fight crime, noting the $270 million allocated to national security over this current two-year budget cycle. But he said government was willing to try to find more for things such as an increase in police pay to recruit and retain the best crime fighting experts or more CCTVs to deter crime and improve detection. But he said, “We just need a proper plan.”

The premier said that improved policing is about dealing with crime now, but the long-term solution was  “stopping our people turning to crime in the first place”, as he pointed to the early identification of young people at risk of offending behaviour, and implementing programmes to help them.

Following his statement, the premier made it clear that the political arm of government had no business being involved in operational activity or who gets recruited or promoted because not only was it a very dangerous thing, but they were not in a position to direct operations.

He said the political arm of government should be concerned with policy and strategy, which could be developed through a police authority, while the National Security Council would still be above that.

See the premier’s full speech in the CNS Library

Tags: , ,

Category: Crime, Crime Prevention

Comments (76)

Trackback URL | Comments RSS Feed

  1. Shepherd says:

    No. The Government should not be involved, or have any say with the Police. MLAs have broken laws or disregards them. Including numerous family members. No. That is the reason why the Governor has a say. Cannot be above the law.

    Those who work in Gov’t departments outside the Police know the meddling is unbelievable. And wholly unprofessional.

    No.

    1
    1
    • Shhhhhhhhhh. says:

      “Shepherd” – I strongly suggest that you take the time to read and understand what the Premier is proposing re, POLICY etc. He definately does not propose to have any say in police operations, but simply to have an important say not only in the allocation of funding, but in the overiding policies that will determine crime fighting strategies. You attempt to use unfortunate negative anecdotal history to justify your desire to deny your elected leaders a proper say in the critical issue of national security. I will also add, as I have said before, that the days of the annual allocation of budgetary funding to the RCIP, without having any oversight to ensure that the money is spent as Parliament intended must end. Furthermore, Mr. Premier, I honestly think that the “necessary conversation” that you refer to, needs to take place with interested members of parliament in the UK, not with the local Governor, whoever that may be. The FCO will only change when the shove comes from the parliament in the UK. Do not waste time with too much “conversation” with the Governor’s Office because they will only pay you lip service. They do not want change. Chenge will have to be forced upon them. I wish you well in your quest for accountability, but take the short road, as time is not on your side with our crime growth. Think on these things carefully!

  2. Anonymous says:

    Well, the governors haven’t had success running the police, and you’re all fearful of your elected representatives having any say, although independent police forces can be corrupt too, as the UK demonstrates daily. There are lots of places where the chief prosecutor and the head of law enforcement are elected. What do they get elected for? Crime fighting. Elections focus the mind on getting results. So what are you going to do? Appoint a security council! That way everyone can say they tried their best when the results are more miserable failure. On the plus side you have a decent police chief trying to save you from yourselves. Good luck.

    2
    1
  3. Mr. Anti-Ganja Boat says:

    The Premier is reaping the benefit from his supporting the police border protection plan to stop guns reaching our shores. I see another drugs boat with gun seized this week. Thank you sir. And to the ganja supporters who think its a waste of police resources; every gun that come to these shores and kill or maime someone, I wonder how you can have a clear conscience because this is how they are getting here on your ganja boats which you seem to have no problem with.

    2
    2
    • Shhhhhhhhhh. says:

      You will never completely stop the flow of drugs and guns into Cayman. Starving and impoverished Haitians are swopping out their surplus guns for meat. these guns then head our way as part of the drug boat cargo. There have to be a deterrents of (1) Higher detection and apprehension rates, supported by (2) Increased sentencing for hard drugs and illegal guns, with meaningful minimum tarriffs to keep the smugglers out of business for a long time. It is costly to imprison these criminals, but you have no choice if you want to stem the flow that is destroying this island. If necessary, seperate the foreign prison population from the local so as to minimize the networking that is a major ingredient in the drug trade. There is no free lunch. If you want any new border protection policies to work, you must increase the deterrent factor, or else, the fancy Coast Guard plans will not deliver the long term results. Catch em, then put them away for a long time, and do not allow them to make the wrong friends in Northward.

  4. Anonymous says:

    Bad idea. I like Alden. I think he’s smart and honest but giving politicians any power over the police is incredibly naive.

    6
    4
    • Anonymous says:

      You don’t think the FCO is political?

      2
      1
    • Shhhhhhhhhh. says:

      So 8.41 do you propose that Cayman’s security be the responsibility of the Governor’s Office forever? Cayman has to grow up politically sooner or later, and take responsibility for it’s affairs, AND, account to it’s people for getting results. Thats ACCOUNTABILITY. This prevalent attitude in Cayman that we can only trust our colonial managers to run our affairs is backward and a self fulfilling prophesy. When the Gov’s Office and the FCO fail to provide the secure environment that Caymanians deserve to live in, who will you complain to, or vote out of office? Presently they are not doing the job adequately, so wake up and face reality, they are not likely to get any better! How much worse will the crime problem in Cayman have to get for Caymanians to get very fed up and demand change? If the problem continues to escalate at the present rate, our tourism, offshore financial services etc. will drift away because people will not wish to visit, nor actually live and work here anymore. Our Premier proposes change in order to introduce accountability to the Caymanian people for security, so what is so scary about that? If he fails, then you can vote against him, but when the present authority fails, as they are doing, what are you going to do??? Will you start burning tyres outside the Governor’s Office in protest? God forbid. Choose the civil option!!

      • Anonymous says:

        You make some very good points which I (8.41) can’t disagree with. Just be careful what you wish for. Not worried about the current lot but a real crook with control of the police can buy all the votes he needs somewhere this small.

    • Shhhhhhhhhh. says:

      And who is in charge of police forces in the UK? You seek to maintain a double standard on this issue. Caymanians, you first must elect more politicians who have integrity, then invest more responsibility and accountability in them. Then you make them answer for results or failure. It is the only way for Cayman to mature politically. Britain does not want you on her frocktail forever so get a dose of reality. This is not ever, ever land. Sooner or later, the UK will shrug Cayman off, so you better be ready and able to trust your own before much longer. The United Nations is highly critical of Britains retention of colonies, so the times, they are a changing. “People get ready, for the trains-a-coming!”

    • Shhhhhhhhhh. says:

      Cayman Is. to be a dependent territory for ever? Not going to happen. The UK wants to divest itself of colonies asap, BUT, if they do not mature and get ready to manage their own affairs, including security, what will eventually happen? Colonies will be pushed overboard eventually, wether they like it or not, so how about getting ready??

  5. Anonymous says:

    CNS: How do you initiate a vote of no-confidence for elected officials?

    CNS: See Ask Auntie question Removing an MLA from office

    2
    1
  6. Anonymous says:

    Bermuda police report to their Minister of National Security who is an elected politician. Has this helped to reduce crime in Bermuda?

    Bermuda’s Minister of National Security is responsible for policy and strategy on crime, so be careful what you ask for Mr. Premier.

    7
    1
  7. Anonymous says:

    Premier want more say over the police the remedy for the premier is to raise the pay fir the police. The marl road talk is recently over a year ago the police were given a raise of pay. The marl road talk is that not all of the police got that raise. The marl road talk is the premier must question if that is true and the premier must make sure all of the police get the raise this time. The marl road talk is that the premier must make sure all of his indigeous caymanian police get the pay raise this time around and do not allow this pay raise to be a buyus one again. The marl road talk is that the premier need to inject some serious cayman dollars in the social issues in cayman starting from the homes, workplaces and the At-Risk-Youths. The marl road talk is that the premier needs to stop being ignorant and biggitive towards the social issues of the cayman islands and take the web from over his eyes and face the real world reality. The marl road talk is that because it did not hit the premier door steps/home as yet no proper, honest and serious attention is given towards the social issues as yet which has caused and continue to be the greatest cause of the crime in cayman and it has caused the high rate of crime in the neighbouring countries. The marl road talk is alot of the crime is imported into cayman from those countries that their social issues were ignored just like what has happened in cayman for years and continue to happen in cayman and the caymanian youths have adapted and continue to adapt to such a life/living.

    7
    2
  8. Somebody says says:

    This little premier is so power hungry it’s embarrassing.

    12
    4
  9. Anonymous says:

    Is there a framework in place where a certain amount of the voting populace can declare no confidence in their leaders?
    If so, this POS will be the first to go. I have no idea why the “official” press protect him so much.
    Did they get over their little spat?

    11
    3
  10. Anonymous says:

    After approving a $250mln budget he suddenly wants access to the funds…it has nothing to do with policing.

    15
    5
  11. Anonymous says:

    This bloke is a Freemason
    I cannot believe a damned word he says.

    17
    5
  12. Anonymous says:

    Diogenes, I agree. So, let’s call a referendum on de-criminalization of cannabis in small amounts and growing of a few plants per person. There will then be no need to import weed, which includes the coke and guns and RCIPS can focus resources accordingly.

    All it takes is a 2/3 majority of the voting public to call a referendum. I’m on board!

    15
    2
    • Diogenes says:

      You’ll be even happier to hear this,
      It actually only requires a petition signed by a quarter of registered voters to initiate an referendum, that is still upwards of 5000, persons but it possible for us in a small jurisdiction like this, most persons on Cayman have a couple hundred people added on their Facebook accounts, if we could get a group of 10-20 persons to circulate the petition to all of their friends or spread the word and have the petition in a public area at a specific time to allow persons to come and sign it, we could have those signatures in a week or two and I could deliver the petition to the Cabinet Secretary personally

      But we would have to ensure each name is on the register of electors and that each person is Caymanian, the Cabinet would likely scrutinize the list for any reason to disqualify persons and nullify the potential for a plebiscite,

      It can be done someone just has to take initiative

      7
      1
    • Anonymous says:

      How is that going to work. The soil here is no good for growing good quality weed and not the space. So unless the government are going to set up a side line importing weed and selling from shops, it will still come on the boats with all the other stuff from Jamaica

      2
      2
    • Anonymous says:

      I really cannot understand why some of you out there think that legalizing marajuana is the answer for everything. Stop trying to clear up a problem by creating another problem.

      8
      2
      • Diogenes says:

        Look at every single canoe they have caught
        and then tell me what each canoe contains

        I will break it down for you since you seem to lack the intelligence to piece it together yourself

        Almost every canoe contains at least two of these things (if not all)
        1 – Illegal substances
        2 – Illegal Firearms and ammunition
        3 – Illegal immigrants

        If we can eliminate the illicit market for the illicit substances it will have the effect of reducing the supply of the canoes overall no one is just bringing canoes full of guns into Cayman, they bring drugs AND guns.
        The drugs are sold for profit and the guns are distributed among criminal groups and gangs on the islands.
        If the drugs were no longer profitable I GUARANTEE the frequency of the Canoes would drop and with that the illegal importation of guns into the Cayman Islands.
        Every single area of the world that has legalized cannabis has shown that people if given the opportunity to buy from a legal and vetted and regulated distributor or an illegal unregulated distributor will tend toward the legal market rather than the illegal one.
        Seeing as there is no way to stop persons from buying the drugs in the first place, we might as well legalize it and tax it so the government can do something productive with the revenue

        If we eliminate the profit motive for these canoes (drug transportation and sales) they will likely stop arriving with guns because they can’t turn a quick profit with guns in our jurisdiction
        Look at the news from Wednesday night:
        https://caymannewsservice.com/2018/03/cops-net-ganja-and-gun-in-jamaican-canoe-bust/

        Lots of cannabis, but note only one gun in the canoe, if we corner the market on Cayman with legal weed, supplemented with an effective coast guard the canoes will stop

        There are only certain groups who are advocating for the continuation of the pointless war on drugs:
        – Religious nuts who want to police the morals of society (as they allow persons binge drink and chain smoke their bodies into hospice care)
        -The pharmaceutical industry and their shills who want to avoid potential hits to their bottom lines as they support the over-prescription of highly addictive opioids
        -Vapid conservatives who want to stick to arbitrary “traditional values and beliefs”
        Which are you?

        What exactly is the problem that legalizing cannabis would cause?

        Please stop being intellectually dishonest, you aren’t fooling anyone
        and you certainly won’t get away with it here

        Diogenes

        4
        4
        • Anonymous says:

          How are you aware that it was only one gun in the canoe. Maybe that one was overlooked (generally dark at night) and the other dozen or so was thrown overboard. The water is only 5000 feet or more over the drop-off.

          • Diogenes says:

            This is what you turn to when your argument and mindset is wrong

            ‘What if'”, “But maybe” “How do you know” Etc etc etc
            High minded rationalizations and Intellectual dishonesty at its finest

            You think these persons threw over all their guns except one?
            Really? Not like almost every canoe caught is a similar story, many dozens of pounds of drugs and 1 or 2 guns and some ammo

            I am using the evidence actually found and documented but you are inventing hypothetical (and thus nonexistent) firearms that were thrown overboard (convenient) to justify your position
            Talk about ass-backwards…
            You really have to do better
            You are working backwards from your conclusion fabricating information , whereas I am using evidence to back my claims
            See how that works, try it sometimes

            Diogenes

            1
            1
        • Anonymous says:

          Not a fan of weed myself but it’s blindingly obvious that prohibition doesn’t work and causes far more harm than good…

          • Diogenes says:

            Totally respectable position to hold, I am not a big fan of cigarettes myself
            But that doesn’t mean I think that if someone else wants to smoke a pack a day they should have to be subject to my beliefs

            The moral policing needs to end in Cayman

            If someone wants to tweak their conciousness in the privacy of their own home using cannabis it is none of my concern and certainly not the concern of the state
            People go out and get drunk and unruly all the time, and it is perfectly legal

            Diogenes

  13. Anonymous says:

    And then the next step is Premier for life?

    6
    5
  14. Anonymous says:

    No, No and No. The police force has to be independent, and dare I say it, run by a truly independent body, with no interference from politicians. The RCIPs must be held accountable to the public, and the LA must pass laws that make sense in this modern day, so that resources are not wasted on stupid things that matter little. The fact that they want to interfere, I find worrying. Maybe all the comments on here about corruption worrying a few?

    26
    • Shhhhhhhhhh. says:

      Well, if you do not want the representatives elected by the Cayman people to have any say in National Security, what else do you propose? The Governor’s Office which has total control over policy, admin and operations of the RCIP sure as hell are not doing the job. The parliament votes to allocate the funds, and yet has no say in how or even where they are spent. I have seen where funding approved in the RCIP budget for specific purposes, has been manipulated and shifted to other budget areas at the whim and fancy of previous CP’s to suit their particular agendas. Yet, the elected reps have had no say in how this has been done. The accountability for the security of The Cayman Islands is a total fiasco, and as long as it rests with the FCO and Governor’s Office, the Caymanian people will never get the security that they deserve, and by the way, is that a human right?? LOL.

      5
      9
      • Anonymous says:

        That is not the question, the question is what do the MLA’s actually propose to do with this “power” and what safeguards there would be to stop them abusing such power? The answer is none, which is why it cannot happen.

        12
        • Shhhhhhhhhh. says:

          The abuse of power that you refer to is subject to the oversight of the Governor. No law can be enacted without the Governor’s approval. This situation in Cayman where the Governor’s Office and FCO run the security of Cayman into the ground has to change. They do not answer to those affected by the decline in the security environment, and nothing will change until there is ACCOUNTABILITY. It is a fundamental principle of democracy, or is it that Cayman is to continue being under the colonial frocktail forever, and never ever grow up politically? Make up your mind Cayman, what do you want? Do you not want to have control over your own destiny, or continue being an unwanted responsibility of the FCO ad infinitum? You cannot have your cake and eat it. If you are happy with how the FCO and Governor’s Office run the security of Cayman, then shut up and stop complaining about the growth in crime. I am not quite what “Independent body” you propose, but maybe you would care to share a positive idea here.

          3
          3
          • Anonymous says:

            And then the governor interferes and there is a shit storm of Caymanians complaining about that and “how dare the Governor interfere with Caymanian politicians”. How about you take responsibility for your own criminals for a change? That ironically, is the cake and eat it part. You are not prepared to sort it out yourself, you want Mummy to, but only to the degree that you like. That’s not what Mummies do.

            1
            1
        • Anonymous says:

          And looking at track records… SCARY if it did happen.

  15. Anonymous says:

    Stay focused on giving away the country Aldart

    21
    1
  16. Anonymous says:

    I do not believe that Cayman politicians would improve the law enforcement issue in the country. My concern is that they would use law enforcement for political strong arm tactics against opposition opinion.
    Is that an outrageous concern?
    Think about it.

    21
    2
  17. POLITRICKS101 says:

    This is the same speech by the Premier that has been rehashed several times over the years. The words ring hollow and things are getting worse but government are in denial.

    We want real representation for MLA’s to earn their paychecks and work together to help our communities fight the scourge of rising crime particularly violent crime and gun related crimes. Why can’t 19 MLA’s be united working together in holding the relevant stakeholders accountable which is how they best represent constituents?

    Cayman government needs less talk and more positive actions and accountability at several levels including parents, education department, children & family services, probation & rehabilitation services, RCIPS, stronger mandatory sentencing guidelines, a comprehensive crime & safety plan from the relevant authorities and Governors office plus full engagement from all elected MLA’s and Cabinet members must stop passing the parcel to the Governor’s office.

    The Premier and all MLAs must also take the view that they also have some responsibility in running the country the excuses are no longer acceptable.
    The Premier and all MLA’s of our Islands need to publicly ask one question collectively:

    1. What exactly is the Governor’s Office doing strategically about Crime, Security & Safety matters which is the primary function of the Governor Office the UK’s representative in the Cayman Islands?

    The time has come for our elected MLA’s to hold the Governor’s office & RCIPS Commissioner accountable at every opportunity because we are sliding into dangerous territory and our leaders appear indifferent to the increasing levels of crime in our communities.

    26
    1
  18. Anonymous says:

    that what mashed up other caribbean islands…by allowing politicians to control police!!!??? at least with british oversight…less corruption! and yes i am a native caymanian!??

    48
    1
  19. Anonymous says:

    This is so intriguing to me. Why would the Premier wait to complain about such a serious issue afflicting our islands, until the Governor he described as being one of our best Governors, left! If he’s suggesting that this spike in crime or our inability to tackle it effectively somehow has something to do with the UK, then he shouldn’t have waited until a governor he held in high regard, left before he complained about her lack of cooperation or whatever he thinks she should have done. Things that make you go, hmmmm.

    36
    1
  20. Anonymous says:

    ppm…masters of doing nothing.

    17
    1
  21. Anonymous says:

    Shut the hell up Alden!

    21
    2
  22. Anonymous says:

    Action should have been taken a long time ago!! RCIP ha gotten a pay raise and now more police officers and the crime has increased! someone has to answer & actions is needed before tesr islands end up like Milwaukee=people sleeping with guns under their beds etc!! Bracka

    19
    3
  23. Anonymous says:

    And remember what happened when the previous administration he was part of started interfering with RCIPS? The loss of one of the finest officers we’ve ever had on these islands and the destruction of a DTF that was definitely going round taking care of business. I wonder who’s pulling the strings this time?

    24
    5
  24. Anonymous says:

    Security is a national matter and not one suited to local, territorial level of governance.

    20
    1
  25. West bay Premier says:

    It has taken the Premier this long to say something about the crime
    issue that has the Island about destroyed /ruined . And Mr Premier if the Politicians get leverage over the RCIPS then they are going to be worse off and less effective.

    I know if you do some communications and talking to all responsible parties and discuss the crime issues and come up with a solution to problems, would be allot better than getting Politicians involved in the Police works . They should stay out . But you Mr Premier are the Leader of the Islands, so show your Leadership and take care of the crime problems before it’s too late.

    19
    1
  26. Diogenes says:

    Legalizing and regulating cannabis would be a good place to start in regard to a lot of what is considered “crime” in these islands.
    If we can crush the demand for illegal imported drugs, it will lower the supply of illegal imported drugs a basic economic principle and seeing as the war on drugs is a FAILURE in all regards, it is time that we look toward another solution.
    A lot of the conversations held publicly on these issues are dominated by the views of the elderly on these islands, the people at home all day with nothing better to do than sit and call into each and every radio show to voice their concerns and to wield their political power. We have failed politicians and former political hopefuls on the radio throwing fuel on the flames and stoking the resentment of these groups (some justifiably and others not so much) We know the largest voting groups on these islands are the 50-60 group and the 40-50 group and much like we see with many issues around the world nowadays there is a generational divide with the older folks and the youth mixed with an abysmal youth voting rate. When are we going to say as a people respectfully to those older persons “You have had your time at the wheel and your strategies didn’t work then and won’t work now so we will be moving on to something new? When will we take an honest look in the mirror and look at the damage we have and are causing to our society all in the name of “tradition”. We live in this society which glorifies our elders to the point where any criticism of them garners public disdain, even when they are wrong. Are we meant to remain silent on these issues of today to sooth the fears of a shrinking group in our society. What are we meant to do wait until they are all 6 feet under to solve a problem with a clear solution? These older persons have the same right to an opinion and a say as anyone else, but they have to acknowledge their methods are ineffective today, the past is gone, we need new solutions to new problems. They should have an equal say in the conversation, where today they are given the overwhelming voice in the conversation. Caymanian persons between the ages of 20-40 make up somewhere around 20% of our population according to the 2016 compendium of statistics (though they vote in far fewer percentages) when will we start acknowledging their new ideas?

    We can look at any of the areas that have done wide-reaching legalization programs on prohibited or illicit substances and see the difference it makes, Portugal for instance legalized everything from cannabis to heroin more than 15 years ago, and they have the progress to show for it, lower overdoses and lower drug related crimes overall. Persons are not treated as criminals for their addictions they are provided treatments and safe places for them to address their issues.

    When will Cayman let the past be the past and enter into the future?

    20
    7
  27. Anonymous says:

    More CCTV Cameras, because they work so well now, all the crimes we solve using them, where would we be without them

    18
  28. Anonymous says:

    The Premier seems to have forgotten that his government has control of the legislation that the police enforce. He also seems to be completely unaware that many of the most violent crimes now happening are being committed by people let loose on our streets after serving only a fraction of their sentences.

    If he was serious about reducing crime and particularly the violent crime we are now experiencing he would immediately amend the Penal Code and the Conditional Release Law so that violent criminals are no longer put back on the street after serving only a fraction of their sentences.

    And no I definitely do not want him determining police procedures about which he knows nothing. Leave that job to the professionals and do your own damn job.

    33
    1
    • Anonymous says:

      For example, Traffic Code defines “offenses” where there is no case law or defined regulations. Certainly no pattern of citation!

    • e says:

      Don’t worry! Our Fearless Leader said he was going to stop 60% of the illegal guns from coming in. Soon there will NO illegal guns! In a few more years all will be peaceful and everyone will be safe here in Cayman. Don’t worry. Our Fearless leaders will take care of us………… but AFTER taking care of themselves.

  29. Anonymous says:

    More alcoholic drinks in the bar rooms and beautiful surroundings with senoritas just fine for the premier no need for the premier to worry about the crime and social issues in the cayman islands once it’s not hitting the premier door step. The premier will do to the security matters like what were done with the garbage Not-A-Ting but more mess. The more power given to our caymanian people that is in higher positions they just ride their own people too pieces and make a fool of themselves and they do not want anyone to tell them what to do even when they know that they are wrong they will still continue too ride the horse to pieces even when they get throwed off of the horse they still will not believe it really happened sometimes cuffs and cells is the only solution.

    17
    1
    • Anonymous says:

      You make some excellent points. This is probably the most accurate posting on this thread. Well done.

  30. Anonymous says:

    …because taking over control of immigration from the British has worked so well?

    22
  31. Anonymous says:

    We are tired of the bollocks and excuses!

    25
    3
  32. Anonymous says:

    He speaks!….well its about time he said something given his complete silence on the topic. However, like with many speeches the Premier can talk but this country in now in a place where we need action… and NOW! Crime, social issues and the lack of early intervention has always been issues in Cayman, its just that those in political positions never considered it of national importance but now it has become the focal point both locally and internationally. So ‘Government of Unity’— that’s see what you do with this one! #dosomething #solutionsneeded #dealwiththerealproblems #weneedrealleaders

    23
    2
  33. Anonymous says:

    Alden you aren’t up to the task of leadership please resign now and call early elections

    34
    7
  34. Anonymous says:

    The Premier was noticeably asleep on the crime wave engulfing the islands lately but the mere mention of the Opposition’s bringing of a motion for a committee of the entire house to come up with suggestions to bring crime under control woke him up today. Keep the pressure on Opposition, he would have a conniption fit before he would try to work together for the betterment of the Cayman Islands. As Michelle Obama would say, whey he goes low you guys go high.

    25
    6
    • Anonymous says:

      Michelle, sorry to mess up your quote with a typo. Should be ” when he goes low, you guys go high”

      8
      3
  35. Anonymous says:

    People call for more say over politicians!

    32
    2
  36. The Lone Gunman says:

    More of the usual chatter from Premier McLaughlin nothing is his responsibility so his hands are tied. The only thing missing from his speech is the campaign promise to reduce gun crime by 60%. The Premier is losing credibility by the day and sounds like a snake oil salesman detached from reality of the people instead of the politically elected leader of the Cayman Islands.

    30
    5

Please include your email address in the form below if you are using your real name. You can use a pseudonym, with or without leaving an email address, or just leave the form blank to be "Anonymous". All comments will be moderated before they are published. Please read the CNS Comment Policy at the top of this page.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

SIGN UP FOR THE CNS NEWS LETTER, SENT EVERY WEEKDAY STRAIGHT TO  YOUR INBOX