Ex-traffic police boss admits drunken hit-and-run

| 29/01/2018 | 57 Comments
Cayman News Service

Former RCIPS inspector Adrian Barnett

(CNS): The former head of the RCIPS traffic unit, Adrian Barnett (54), has pleaded guilty to dangerous driving, driving while impaired and leaving the scene of an accident in connection with a smash near the junctions of Linford Pierson Highway, Crewe Road and Shamrock Road last June. A charge of misleading police was dropped when Barnett appeared in Summary Court Monday morning and admitted the traffic charges. He handed over his driver’s licence to the court and was bailed to return Wednesday for sentence.

The former inspector who had led the traffic unit for several years was placed on required leave following the smash but he has since retired from the service. An RCIPS spokesperson confirmed that Barnett retired in December.

The collision happened on 10 June while Barnett was off-duty and driving a white Pontiac SUV when he rear-ended a silver Land Rover before leaving the scene of the crash. No one was hurt and Barnett was tracked down and arrested by his RCIPS colleagues a few days after the incident and was charged in December just before he retired from the police service.

Tags: , , ,

Category: Courts, Crime, Police

Comments (57)

Trackback URL | Comments RSS Feed

  1. Anonymous says:

    cat of nine whip???? jerk💋




    0



    1
    • was justice done says:

      CBS can we have an update on the sentence by the Court today 31.1.18. Was there no conviction recorded for these convictions.




      2



      0
  2. Anonymous says:

    This officer wasn’t a product of the UK police system, trained and experienced by some of the best in the world. No, he was an EMT who applied to the RCIPS and made his way up the ladder without the checks and balances normally expected to attain such senior rank.
    Simply put, he is a Caymanian citizen and a product of all the hang ups that come with the failure to employ and train the right people to become professional law enforcers.
    You dont want to pay for the best there is, you would rather make do with those who come from countries whose chaotic and corrupt societies are reflected in their lack of skill, literacy or empathy for local laws, or recruit those who would never make the grade in a more professional service overseas.
    This particular ‘officer’ is a product of this Islands inability to control its public servants within existing rules, its failure to discipline civil servants of all classes when they clearly break the rules and a total failure to train those who are meant to set the best examples at world accredited facilities and not on the cheap.
    Local recruitment is essential, but that must be followed with the best training and opportunities for experiencing real life away from Cayman. Secondment to the UK for 1year with regular refresher and advancement training should be high on the agenda, as must a review of ALL law enforcement departments and the examination of their members external activities and general discipline.
    Law enforcement should not be looked upon as just another job, it is a vocation and a public service that should come with the highest standards.

    Time for change.




    9



    2
  3. Anonymous says:

    Couldn’t happen to a nicer person. Enjoy your full pension retirement. Should have stuck to driving ambulances, but driving them whilst drunk would have been even less impressive I suppose.




    7



    1
  4. Anonymous says:

    Guessing the job failed him as an alcoholic. Everyone knew but did nothing




    7



    1
  5. Anonymous says:

    Poor behavior from someone who should be upholding the law and encouraging others to do likewise.




    8



    1
  6. Get what you sow says:

    Sorry. But karma is not to be fooled around with. She is mean and will hit you when she is ready.
    He got the same thing handed to him, just like he did to so many others.
    Where are the ones that sent you out to do the work they were too coward to do themselves.
    Thats why he went up the ranks. When he got to close to them they let him fall, and the same way he went after others.
    Police are only human. They too make mistakes, no matter where their from. Its how its dealt with that matters.
    Officers have discreation. He didnt use his so they didnt use their’s on him.
    Life aint so good no more is it.




    8



    1
  7. Anonymous says:

    And of course, there is NO other Caymanian on this island guilty of ANY crime.” He who has not sinned cast the first stone”……..what, no stones??? I guess not you lot of hypocrites!! Read CNS news more carefully on a daily basis and see your homegrown committing horrendous armed robberies, rapes, and murders! The whole island is full of paedophiles getting away with it because they are in high places or from well to do families. Adrian made a silly mistake. We have all been there. He was a good officer that worked his way up from the ranks. There’s hardly one officer that hasn’t been in that situation at one time but been lucky enough not to have been caught. Not that I am condoning such foolishness but you should all look in the mirror!




    22



    29
    • Anonymous says:

      Adrian made a silly mistake??? He is the HEAD OF THE TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT. It is HIS BLOODY JOB, to NOT MAKE THESE TYPES OF “SILLY” MISTAKES.

      HEAD TRAFFIC COP, drinking and driving and fleeing the scene of an accident is a silly mistake? What the hell is wrong with you?




      44



      2
    • Anonymous says:

      *looks in the mirror*

      Clean criminal record
      Not so much as a parking ticket
      Caymanians commit crime just like any other demographic on earth

      Perhaps you ought to look up the definition of hypocrite

      This man was such an upstanding officer that instead of staying at the scene and facing the consequences with integrity he fled because he know the consequences of his actions

      The man should have known more than most the consequences of his actions
      The Magistrate should make an example of him




      33



      1
      • Anonymous says:

        He did not flee the scene of the accident! He exchanged details with the other driver and if no injuries were caused you can leave without Police in attendance as long as each party agrees who is at fault and does not refuse to exchange details




        1



        1
        • Anonymous says:

          Half correct. No smart person admits fault or denies it , especially when that decision may be erroneous. Insurance companies can decide who is responsible for the damages, also the police can attend without injuries. Police can choose to attend due to a variety of factors. The absence of injury not necessarily a factor that would dictate they not attend the scene of an accident or collision




          1



          0
    • Anonymous says:

      ‘Adrian made a silly mistake’ my ass, Adrian is a well known drunk around certain bars and has been for years. His penchant for drink driving wasn’t a mistake it is a habit that has finally caught up with him.
      He may well have been a fine police officer, but fine officers with his former responsibilities shouldn’t make sillly mistakes whilst dictating the rules to the rest of us.
      I do agree however that his sin is no more or no less serious than the hundreds of Caymanian criminals that make life so difficult for both their own people and the wider community.




      18



      2
    • imported says:

      imported Caymanian. I hope the Court sends him to AS he really needs it.




      0



      0
  8. Anonymous says:

    Can you imagine, HEAD OF TRAFFIC! He should bury his head in the sand like an ostrich! Someone said “respect for owning up’, he had no choice, the cameras was there to prove his lies. Hope the judge gives him what he deserves.




    27



    11
  9. Anonymous says:

    He should have hired Gary Wong. He could have got him at least 4 years on full pay.




    29



    3
    • Anonymous says:

      Not even the last day of January & top comment of 2018 , rest of the year going to be tuff gong…




      1



      0
  10. West bay Premier says:

    Unaah leave him alone he just really had a bad day and had to get drunk , see he plead guilty. That make him a responsible Police Officer don’t see that too often .




    17



    13
  11. Tur Alors! says:

    I think this poor man has been treated very badly as he only got to sit at home (or take another job) for 6 months whilst on full pay. The rule of thumb in the Civll Service is generally 2 to 3 years before the case comes up.




    30



    9
  12. Anonymous says:

    at least he is not trying weasel his way out of it …like so many other civil servants who were in the same position…




    29



    7
    • Anonymous says:

      Whatever you say….still doesn’t change the simple facts:

      Former Head of RCIPS traffic unit pleads guilty to dangerous driving, driving while impaired and leaving the scene of an accident in connection with a smash near the junctions of Linford Pierson Highway, Crewe Road and Shamrock Road last June.

      Imagine being in such a position of responsibility and power in society, where you are responsible for ticketing and charging persons who do just the same.

      Hypocrisy much???




      20



      5
    • Ron the Observer says:

      Correction: He did try to weasel his way out of it, which is why they originally wanted to charge him with misleading police. Check the facts reported so far about this case: the dude ran into another car, fled the scene (believe that’s textbook hit-and-run), lied to police about what happened, then due probably to witnesses and other solid evidence, he had to come clean. By comparison I’m sure he did better than other civil servants in similar positions who would’ve lied to the ends of the earth…but that is not a compliment for him.




      26



      2
      • SSM345 says:

        True story; a number of his charges were dropped yesterday and he only pled guilty to 3 out the original 5 or 6.




        9



        1
      • Anonymous says:

        you are correct…a little bit of weaseling is to be expected…but at least he has stopped weaseling now….




        2



        2
  13. Anonymous says:

    If you’re wondering what the significance of the dropped charge is and you aren’t a legally inclined, it will essentially mean that this is a traffic offence rather than a both
    Which I am sure as a former traffic cop he is well aware of, he’s going to get a slap on the wrist, maybe a fine or something because of the optics of him being a police officer
    If I was that judge he would be in jail, send the message the police are to obey the laws to a higher standard than normal citizens
    It wouldn’t make the judge any friends in the RCIPS but friendship be damned
    Whats next will the financial crimes head be arrested for money laundering?
    Will the homicide head be arrested for attempted murder
    The RCIPS really does pick them well




    9



    3
    • Anonymous says:

      *Addendum* I meant rather than both a criminal and traffic offence




      3



      1
    • Anonymous says:

      Financial Industry anti-money laundering & compliance head ‘IS’ in Northward for money laundering & theft , no less . Or have we already forgotten about our BMW driving British Brederen from Patricks Island ?




      0



      0
  14. Anonymous says:

    Well, at least he’s not “a man from Bodden Town” which all the other criminals seem to be these days.




    20



    6
  15. Diogenes says:

    Slap on the wrist incoming




    19



    3
  16. Anonymous says:

    RCIPS Motto – DO as we SAY, not as we do! Disgusting!




    22



    3
    • Anonymous says:

      6:48 And this isn’t the first time that we’ve had a head of the traffic unit who lectured us about drink driving then went out and ignored his own preaching? I remember seeing one of Barnett’s predecessors driving home after getting totally ratted on several occasions. He was also quietly retired some years ago.




      10



      2
  17. Anonymous says:

    Fixing your cap-badge while under the influence…




    10



    1
    • Anonymous says:

      4:50 PM
      I laughed my ass off when I noticed the cockeyed position of the hat badge. And your coment was right on target laughed laughed my ass off again so obvious. Chill out laugh a little.




      4



      3
  18. Anonymous says:

    You’ve answered your own question. He made an ill judged decision because he was impaired, oh and the fact the bar he had just left was likely to be called to give evidence at any trial.
    It’s clear a deal has been done, full retirement if an admission of guilt is forthcoming.




    39



    1
    • Anonymous says:

      Ding, ding, ding, ding, ding! The only person (besides me) to comment on this article and see it for what it actually is….a nice, rosy plea deal with all its perks.




      40



      3
    • Anonymous says:

      No deal was needed dodo, it has to do with Public Service Pension Law & Regs. If, and he is, over 55 he is eligible for full retirement. Further under Police Law regardless of age once a junior officer i.e below rank of Chief Inpector, has served at least 21 yrs, he or she can retire w/o any penalty and this fellow served for over 23 yrs. He did his time and is entitled to move on with his life. Yes he made a serious mistake but he did the right thing by pleading guilty and is deserving of the same dignity anyone else in a similar situation would receive.




      31



      10
  19. Anonymous says:

    At least he pleaded guilty…saves a lot of time and public money.




    62



    4
  20. Anonymous says:

    Respect for owning up.




    64



    9
  21. Anonymous says:

    If this is the example we have to follow is it any wonder our roads are such a mess?




    37



    6
    • Anonymous says:

      I think this incident more shows how important being able to drive is in Cayman, that people you would think would have every reason never to risk their licence still do risk it and some will do desperate things to try to keep it as well. It points to the underlying issue of our alcohol and driving culture being a more powerful driver of behaviour than our laws and the likelihood of their enforcement. The truth is the people who think it’s never worth the risk are very much a minority; those who think they can get away with it most of the time with their fingers crossed are the majority and that means they can be found all throughout society.




      28



      1
  22. The Constitutional Critic says:

    Is anyone really surprised the RCIPS have always been a shining example,
    The Queen’s Finest




    26



    9
  23. Anonymous says:

    The mind boggles. You’re the former top traffic cop, you’re off duty, you rear-end a vehicle with no one injured – why leave, why not just exchange details? He didn’t have to say who he was. Why has he pled guilty to driving while impaired when he was not found for days – what evidence of impairment is there? Got some questions here, looking forward to the sentencing.




    58



    6
    • Anonymous says:

      He’s an idiot really. It was minor and could have been sorted out without the police even having to show up. I don’t get it either, this man just hung himself for no reason.




      47



      0
      • Spicr says:

        Yeap he is an idiot and disgrace to the RCIP. He will have no conviction record. Wait and see. He was always drunk at work like many others who are still there.




        21



        7
    • Anonymous says:

      Precisely , many will agree there. A minor traffic incident by todays standards . Why would someone of this stature in the force jeopardize their position & future retirement , when off duty? Why throw yourself under your own front wheels? Puzzling




      28



      1
      • Anonymous says:

        It’s not puzzling. he messed up. but now he has admitted that he did wrong. That is not the easiest way out for him, but he has done the right thing in the end.




        21



        5
      • Anonymous says:

        1.25pm. Puzzling….. it called alcoholism …. always DRUNK. And…. just imagine “we need more police”. I don’t think so.




        21



        5
    • Anonymous says:

      When judgement and rational thought are impaired, simple errors can beget more consequential mistakes. That’s the lesson. Being sneaky and dishonest in hindsight does not serve the public. Glad he manned-up and did the right thing. It was really the only thing he could do.




      35



      1
    • Anonymous says:

      Well, running from the cops is pretty much a national pastime here.




      15



      1
    • Anonymous says:

      Some call it honesty




      6



      4
      • Dunz says:

        Honesty would have been to wait, or once he got home he contacted the police. He did none of that, he had to be searched for ( wasting police time ) be arrested taken to court and then fess up. He had no way out and took the easy option!




        9



        1
      • Dunz says:

        Where is the honesty, he drove off from the scene of the crime had several days to make it right and only told the truth as he was caught bang to rights. If this comes up twice sorry.




        11



        0

Please include your email address in the form below if you are using your real name. You can use a pseudonym, with or without leaving an email address, or just leave the form blank to be "Anonymous". All comments will be moderated before they are published. Please read the CNS Comment Policy at the top of this page.

See today’s question on
CNS Local Life