RCIPS seeks Caymanians to boost its ranks

| 14/09/2017 | 40 Comments
Cayman News Service

Cayman police officers in BVI after Hurricane Irma (Photo courtesy BVI News Online)

(CNS): Amid news that police officers from the Cayman Islands are tackling critical and challenging work on hurricane-ravaged islands, the RCIPS launched another recruitment drive, particularly targeting Caymanians between the ages of 18 and 40. The aim is for a class of at least ten recruits to begin the 17 weeks of initial training in early January 2018. “We are asking young Caymanians to answer this call to serve,” said Police Commissioner Derek Bryne.

“Your local knowledge, talents and passion to protect your country are wanted and needed. We are in the process of building the modern, progressive, 21st century police service the islands need and deserve, and you can be a central part of this important and fascinating project. It is an exciting time to become a police officer,” Bryne added.

Candidates for the position of local constable should hold Caymanian citizenship, be between 18 and 40 years old, be physically fit (demonstrated through passing the “5.4 bleep test”) and possess a high school diploma and/or 3 CXCs or equivalent (including Maths and English language). Permanent residents with the right to work without restrictions are also invited to apply.

Candidates also must hold a valid CI driver’s license, be computer literate, and complete all aspects of the application (which you can down here) truthfully.

“Now is a good time for young Caymanians to seriously consider entering the Service,” said Deputy Commissioner of Police Kurt Walton. “There are many more paths that can be taken and expertise that can be developed in a police career now than when I first joined, thanks to technology and increasing collaboration with international law enforcement. From financial investigations to forensics to child protection, a policing career embraces all kinds of talents and develops specialized skill sets. Being a small but important jurisdiction means that young officers have more opportunities to do a wide range of things.”

The recruitment process is lengthy, encompassing written tests, a physical exam, background check, an interview and a medical. Once selected, recruits then must undertake and pass 17 weeks of initial training.

For those who wish to find out more about a policing career and the application process, the RCIPS TDU will be holding two Open Days during which potential applicants can learn more about the different departments and career paths within the Service from officers themselves.

These will take place this Saturday, 16 September between 10:00am and 2:00pm at the offices of the RCIPS Training and Development Unit in Governors Square, as well as on Saturday, 23 September from 10:00am and 2:00pm at the Cayman Brac Police Station Centre on Cayman Brac.

Applications forms and a full description of the minimum qualifications for the position of local police constable can be found here.

The deadline for applications to be considered for this round of recruitment will be Wednesday, 11 October at 12:00pm, and any questions can be addressed to localrecruits@rcips.ky.

Cayman News Service

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Category: Crime, Jobs, Local News, Police

Comments (40)

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  1. Anonymous says:

    I would join if we didn’t have a police state. 400 police and they want more to this little island give me an explanation as to why other than to control us.

  2. Anonymous says:

    The UK police is the caused of low local & regional police in the force before of how they are being treated!! I’m a friend of alot of policemen!!!

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    • Anonymous says:

      Well, when you have to deal with regional police officers that cant spell and write properly and others have to make up for their slack, then want to pretend they are top cops and not follow procedure, they are treated accordingly.

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      • Anonymous says:

        So right ! As an ex I had a few run -ins dont know there ass from their toe. Main ones were the domestics gas attendants low skilled jobs ones!

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  3. Anonymous says:

    IMO the RCIPS should give preference to candidates from countries that are well-removed from the transshipment crime syndicates that operate in the region. Frankly, I’d feel quite a lot better if we brought the Caribbean-originating officer ratio to zero. Recruiting officers from Tivoli Gardens hasn’t worked. There should also be some requirement to know our laws, use the internet, know north from south, arrive to crime scenes prepared to collect evidence, and a time limit/supervision on the progression of case files. Less quantity and more quality would also be helpful in raising on-duty performance standards.

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  4. Anonymous says:

    I wasn’t bullied in school, therefore I need not apply.

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  5. Anonymous says:

    Is this really being circulated again?? Why can’t we have a proper audit of the current officers before we hire more incompetent officers?

    Let’s work on recruiting officers already familiar with proper police procedure and not used to a culture of violence.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Lets see how many domestics, gardeners, gas attendants, window cleaners vs professionals like bankers etc

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  6. Jotnar says:

    Looked up the “bleep 5.4 ” test. Dear God, my granny could pass that and shes been dead for 20 years. Appreciate its a threshold test rather than a qualification one, but is the barrier that low for entry?

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  7. Anonymous says:

    Good luck to that!!! If you haven’t found a Caymanian in over 20 years you not gonna find one now…all the good ones are gone. Mcartha bodden, king bush, greg Thompson (rest his sole) to mention a few. The police now are useless

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    • Anonymous says:

      They were useless then too.
      Plenty talk about the “good old days” but in reality, they were as good then as they are now.

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      • Yours truly. says:

        Please, if it weren’t for the actions of the aforementioned, our island would not be the paradise foreigners refer to. Instead of being a useless keyboard warrior, have some respect for the people that contributed to the safety and well being of the place you call home, and try to be a little bit more like them if you possibly can. I know its hard.

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      • Anonymous says:

        The best police officers to ever grace the Force was the 70’s 80′ and 90’s. Such a pity we all have to get old and retire or else these officers could have been still there to teach these unprofessional recent ones good policing! The few still remaining ones of this era are still the best in the Force as they are from the old school. Please when hiring, leave out the nannies, window cleaners, gas attendants gardeners and domestic helpers. Bring back the high morals and professionalism to the RCIPS as in the 70’s 80’s 90’s.

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  8. Anonymous says:

    Wonder why so many Caymanians are leaving the RCIPS? Can we find that out?

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    • Anonymous says:

      One reason is their family members give them hell because they expect them to turn a blind eye.

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    • Anonymous says:

      Because you have to have discipline, show up on time and respect your managers. Caymanians are not good at that. Hopeless in fact.

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      • Anonymous says:

        7:16pm. In order to get respect you have to give it. Please do your racist self a favour next time, when all you do is watch the Caymanaians like a hawk. Take a good look at yourself and your kind and look at the time you sit down on your works hours gossiping, hitting on your boss, and smoking your lungs out! Your the hopeless one, can’t even live a good life in your country but coming in another’s man country to bash them with your racist mouth!

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      • Anonymous says:

        Kind of a gross generalization wouldn’t you say. Coupled with a bad delivery. I give you a 2 out of 10.

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        • Anonymous says:

          9:47. Gross just like your skin and your racist mouth! You’re nothing but a shit bag of delivery from no where!

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    • Anonymous says:

      Them too dyyyyarmmmmm lazy!!!!

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      • Anonymous says:

        “Your local (Caymanian) knowledge, talents and passion to protect your country are wanted and needed. We are in the process of building the modern, progressive, 21st century police service the islands need and deserve, and you can be a central part of this important and fascinating project. It is an exciting time to become a police officer,” Bryne added.

        Not for you (jamaican) gun slingers…

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    • Anonymous says:

      Unprofessionalism and being discouraged by the calibre of officers who they have to answer to. e.g domestics and nannies

  9. Anonymous says:

    What is Permanent Residence with the right to work without restrictions? I do not believe such a thing exists.

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    • Anonymous says:

      and as pointed out in a Compass article today there is n such thing as “Caymanian citizenship”

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      • Anonymous says:

        They could do like others in this position. Get work permit and apply for residency, and so on.

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      • Anonymous says:

        It doesn’t say anything about citizenship, just Caymanian.

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        • Anonymous says:

          No, it expressly says Caymanian citizenship. What is that? And rather than voting this comment down if anyone disagrees, please explain.

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          • Jotnar says:

            The article, written by a reporter not the RCIPS, says Caymanian citizenship. The ad, written by the RCIPS, says Caymanian as defined by the Immigration Law. The first is not a recognised legal definition. The latter of course is. You cant blame the police if the ad is right but the reporting of the ad is not.

            CNS: “Candidates for the position of local constable should hold Caymanian citizenship,” is a direct quote from the RCIPS press release. The article is based on that, not the ad.

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        • Jotnar says:

          True – its there in black and white in the ad – just casual reporting

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      • Anonymous says:

        OK. That too?

        I knew a guy with a work permit in his Cayman passport. I know he was not Caymanian. Would the police treat him as one?

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