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MLAs want law firms prosecuted

| 23/02/2017 | 144 Comments
Cayman News Service

MLA Arden McLean

(CNS): A last-minute private member’s motion filed in the parliament by two opposition members is calling for some of the Cayman Islands’ major law firms to be prosecuted for breaching the existing Legal Practitioners Law. Government is due to present an updated, but still controversial, piece of legislation to regulate the legal profession at this current meeting of the Legislative Assembly, but Arden McLean and Winston Connolly, both critics of the new law, want the authorities to investigate allegations that Cayman-based firms are breaking the existing law because they control offices outside the jurisdiction, where unqualified people are practicing Cayman law.

The endless controversy surrounding the proposed new law continues, with some attorneys still opposed to the introduction of the latest bill, despite the significant and lengthy consultation. While the Cayman Islands Law Society and the Caymanian Bar Association as well as some articled clerks have offered their backing, an online survey by opposition MLAs of what was said to be 110 lawyers found that 70% did not think the new law was an “immense improvement” for Caymanians in the profession.

The private member’s motion alleges that some firms are intentionally ignoring and deliberately circumventing Section 10 of the existing Legal Practitioners Law with the connection to rogue offices overseas. They also allege that the firms are breaching the immigration law with the promotion and re-designation of lawyers in their firms.

The opposition MLAs claim the firms have admitted that this is happening, and not only is it having a negative impact on the jurisdiction, they are also dodging fees.

“It is clear from their overt actions and public communications that a large number of the partners and principals of the relevant firms are acting in unison and speaking with one voice on this matter, and have invested heavily in trying to pass the necessary legislation to license such practices and operations, without any disclosure of the structure and nature of their various overseas practices and operations, and without offering any form of indemnification to the jurisdiction or recompense to the Cayman Islands economy for any liability or damage thereby caused to date by such practices and operations,” the motion states.

“It appears that a prima facie case could be made out for prosecution under Section 322 of the Penal Code of all partners and principals and other participating persons in these law firms who conspired with one another to defeat the execution of the said laws,” the MLAs have stated.

As well as calling for government to ask the attorney general to investigate and prosecute any offenders, the MLAs are also accusing the current financial services minister, Wayne Panton, who will be hoping to steer the new law through the LA ahead of the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) assessment, of being conflicted. The motion states that there is an “alleged glaring conflict of interest” with the minister, who was a former managing partner with one of the major law firms and who they say has produced a flawed bill.

It is not clear when the motion will be debated but CNS understands that it has received approval from the speaker to be included in the business of the final meeting before the parliament is prorogued by the governor ahead of Nomination Day.

CNS has contacted the financial services minister about the motion and we are awaiting a response.

See Private Member’s Motion and full survey results in the CNS Library

Cayman News Service

Tags: , , ,

Category: Laws, Politics

Comments (144)

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  1. EYES WIDE SHUT says:

    Time to remove the politics and emotive rhetoric of politicians, Lawyers, Law Firms & Newspaper editorials.

    A few simple questions:

    Has the existing law been broken by the firms?

    10. (1) Subject to section 4, a person who, not being admitted to practise and enrolled as an attorney-at-law, or otherwise lawfully authorised, shall, either directly or indirectly, for, or in expectation of, any fee, gain or reward, draw or prepare any instrument relating to movable or immovable property or any legal proceeding, or shall receive any fee, gain or reward for drawing or preparing any such instrument or proceeding, commits an offence and is liable on summary conviction to a fine of two hundred dollars.
    (2) Subsection (1) shall not extend to –
    (a) any public officer drawing or preparing instruments in the course of his duty; or
    (b) any person employed merely to engross or copy any instrument or proceeding.
    (3) In this section, “instrument” does not include-
    (a) an agreement under hand only;
    (b) a letter or power of attorney; or
    (c) a transfer of stock containing no trust or limitation thereof.

    To answer this question its a simple matter to look at the online bios of the lawyers in the Cayman firms who offer their services in regards to Cayman Islands Law aboard and then to cross reference them to the roll of Attorneys licensed to practice Cayman Islands Law.

    If they are not on the roll then they may have broken the law, if they have there is a minimal fine.

    If the firms have broken the law then they should be held accountable. The Law needs to enforced consistently and is applicable to all parties. Lets deal with it and move forward. Don’t deny that it may have occurred…It can’t be wrong for MLA’s to ask the DPP and the AG to do their job can it?

    Unless this government are saying that by implication some persons and legal entities are ABOVE THE LAW

    Does that sound like Good Governance, Transparency and ACCOUNTABILITY promised by this elected government?




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  2. Corpus Juris says:

    Forget the Legal Practioners Bill: we need an amendment to the Elections Law to make it illegal for a lawyer to be elected to the LA.




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  3. Anonymous says:

    Winston did not have what it takes to become a partner, that is why he became a politician, it seems he still bares a grudge, LOL




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    • Anonymous says:

      Not everyone wants to remain a slave of the large firms. I have so much respect for Winston- he is doing everything he can to make Cayman a better place.




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  4. Anonymous says:

    The Irony of a Cayman politician complaining about entities structuring businesses abroad to avoid paying government taxes is sadly lost on these two.




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  5. Anonymous says:

    Gotta love the hypocritical stance of the proxy swamp-drainers and Brexiteers in the room.
    You guys are awesome.

    – Who

    Very interesting times we live in. Cayman has constantly been told to “get with the (westernised) program” – however, when we display even a hint of patriotism or protectionism today certain folks get their panties all in a bunch.

    Make your mind up folks. Or is it that certain prerogatives are reserved for certain creeds only in this western world of ours?




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  6. Anonymous says:

    I’ve read this article a few times now…I’m confused, i can’t see how can i put the blame on this legal thing on Dart?




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  7. Anonymous says:

    All corporate lawyers should be prosecuted as criminals. Have you seen the rates they charge? I was told recently of one lawyer charging $10 to hit the send button on an email!




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  8. Anonymous says:

    Why does it take an MLA (or two) to say this? I would have thought that any breaking of any law would mean prosecution. Why does an MLA have to ask the Attorney General to do his job?

    If the actions are against the law, then it has been goin on for years. And if it has been going on for years, then the Attorney General AND the DPP have a lot of explaining to do.




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    • Anonymous says:

      The only offence being committed is against Wayne by these pendejos. They should be ashamed of their pathetic actions!




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      • Anonymous says:

        Holding non qualified persons out as cayman attorneys and contravening the immigration law is not an offense to you?




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        • Anonymous says:

          If it is does at all it is done by non-Cayman entities outside of the Cayman Islands and therefore the Cayman Immimgration law does not apply.




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          • Anonymous says:

            It does because rather than promoting Caymanians or rolling expats over they relocate them to their foreign offices and therefore never have to explain to Cayman Immigration why they are being promoted above a Caymanian.




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    • Anonymous says:

      Oh, they have a lot of explaining to do alright. Their inaction may have killed our economy. I do not blame the politicians. They are just the messengers.




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      • Anonymous says:

        Arden has been seeking to deal with the issue of alleged illegal practise for years during the many formulations of the Legal Practitioners Bill. He has been stalwart in his desire to protect Caymanian attoneys. You go Arden. Wayne Panton is very disingenious.




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  9. Anonymous says:

    No I do not think it is positively impacting Caymanians




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  10. Anonymous says:

    What do these firms think would happen if they held non qualified persons out as U.K. Attorneys or Hong Kong attorneys? They would be prosecuted!!




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  11. Anonymous says:

    It’s sad that it has come to this but when politicians and corporations are so interlinked sometimes there is no choice but to shed radical light on it. Proud of Winston and Arden, I’m sure this isn’t easy for them but they are brace and strong and definitely fighting for their people instead of just special interest groups. Thank you Arden and Winston!




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  12. Smitht says:

    A chip on one’s shoulder must be a terrible burden to have to bear. Pray for their salvation.




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  13. Anonymus says:

    Mr. McLean, you and the other fly by the seat of their pants politicians as well as all Caymanians should be on your knees thanking God that the country has a man of Wayne Panton’s intelligence and integrity to represent us internationally. Imagine the mess in London if the likes of Arden and bumbling Winston were up there with their bull in a china shop approach?? This is the first time Cayman has had proper representation in high profile meetings and the rest of us don’t have to hang our heads in shame by sending backwoods idiotic boy wonders to do a man’s job.




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    • Anonymous says:

      Really? Mr. Panton is looking out for his UK colleagues. Mr. McLean knows what he is talking about. Ask Sammy Jackson, Vaughan Carter, Ian Paget Brown among others. Do not let Wayne Panton fool you.




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    • Anonymous says:

      Worse still the forever hone rabble buffoon..




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  14. Politricks says:

    I wish this turkey would get prosecuted. Charges would be impersonating an MLA and driving asleep at the wheel.

    Just a bag of wind from a bygone era this guy.. spouts rhetoric, has contributed nothing in recent memory, collects a fat paycheck, happy days.




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    • Anonymous says:

      He’s just trying to save what’s left of cayman but you couldn’t understand that or maybe you do but you have other motives




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      • Anonymous says:

        He’s just trying to RUIN what’s left of cayman but you couldn’t understand that or maybe you do but you have other motives

        Let me just switch out a word here. You do know what would happen if a lawyer was arrested/prosecuted for this right? BOOOM Bye Bye Cayman




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        • Anonymous says:

          Let me remind you of something- caymans tax free status made these firms not the other way around! If they leave other firms will fill their shoes and they will know better than to pull the wool over our eyes




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          • Fred the Piemaker says:

            No , the creation of laws favourable to offshore business made these firms, and the ability to service that market more efficiently than all the other tax free jurisdictions.

            So no, if you penalise a law firm for offering advice onshore, even when the Cayman law – contrary to Mr Ardens rhetoric, doesnt prohibit it (heres a tip – try reading the law rather than listening to Arden) you send two messages.

            1. We dont care if you as a client want advice in your own time zone and face to face. You the customer need us more than we need you.

            2. If you were going to incorporate in Cayman because we have a strong and reliable legal system, be aware that we prosecute people even when they haven’t broken the law because its politically expedient or we don’t really understand the law.

            At that point you dont need to worry about a law firm leaving. You have to worry about all the customers going to a more sane jurisdiction – also tax free – at which point there won’t be any business to justify the law firms being here. The law firms will be fine – they will just transfer their people to their operations in the other jurisdiction, but Cayman will lose over 50% of its GDP.

            You can ditch your girlfriend if your neighbour tells you – without a shred of proof – that she is cheating, but you are going to end up with no girlfriend and the knowledge that after that treatment she almost certainly will be shacked up with someone else.




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        • Anonymous says:

          So you are saying we should tolerate expats who break our laws?




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          • Anonymous says:

            Why not, you tolerate ignorance by your fellow Caymanians…who also break the law. They seem to get a way with murder (literally).




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  15. Anonymous says:

    These idiots do know that the foreign offices are different legal entities from the Cayman entities don’t they?




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  16. Anonymous says:

    Yawn. Is it an election year?




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  17. Anonymous says:

    What annoys me about this type of grandstanding is that it is directly contrary to the interests of the voters, but the MLAs know it’s too complex an issue for the average voter to understand. The voters read about greedy expats taking jobs from Caymanian lawyers and vote for these clowns, but the reality is that the Cayman economy depends on exactly the sort of activity they want to prosecute. When it comes to law and finance Cayman is just another offshore jurisdiction and has to compete. Having experienced legal practitioners offering Cayman advice in the major financial centers is a big part of what makes it attractive.




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    • Anonymous says:

      Really? I thought unfettered illegality would be contrary to the interests of voters. My bad.




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    • Anonymous says:

      The cayman economy has suffered dearly due to this behavior. Don’t spread such nonsense when you obviously don’t have the first clue about any of it




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      • Anonymous says:

        I am sure the reasoned, well thought out (and accurate) initial post is the one speaking sense here, not the person talking about “dire consequences” to the Cayman economy.

        As a caymanian attorney, I would love to know what these “dire consequences” have been?




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        • Anonymous says:

          Loss of millions of dollars to our economy (80m or more) in lost fees

          Oursourcing of hundred of jobs to cheap jurisdictions

          Subjecting our reputation to serious harm by holding non qualified lawyers out as cayman attorneys- I bet their clients would have loved to know that before sending them their private information which may now not be subject to any legal privilege

          Let’s start there and not even mention the extreme bus against caymanians at these firms




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          • Anonymous says:

            Your privilege point is, of course, nonsense from the school of made up law. Privilege attaches to communications with foreign qualified lawyers advising on Cayman law. Read IBM Corp v Phoenix International (Computers) Ltd if you don’t believe me. Maybe you should study the law a bit more when you are riding the “extreme bus” instead of swapping self-pitying hard luck stories.




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            • Anonymous says:

              Privilege only applies to communications between AN ATTORNEY and a client. If these people did not hold any practicing certificate (in any jurisdiction) there is no privilege. Read the case yourself one more time and come back then please.




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      • Jotnar says:

        Try taking your own advice




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  18. Anonymous says:

    “Oh! What a tangled web we weave, when first we practice to deceive.”

    The laws of this world have been manipulated over time to benefit the rich and powerful.
    Keep your laws and your silly legal games, I would rather be under the law of God. At least I am loved. Time will soon be over for us all. Let’s get ready. It is time for us all to be saved by Jesus. Hell is real.




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  19. Ppm koolaid says:

    Boy the PPM bloggers are out in force




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  20. Anonymous says:

    Clean up EE Arden..




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  21. Anonymous says:

    Arden you are being used. I seriously doubt you understand much of this issue but are putting yourself on a limb for other interests. Minister Panton does understand and is trying to make changes to improve the situation. I do not believe for 1 second that he is bringing this law for any other reason.
    Why not support the proposed bill? It is much better than what we have now. Then, if the desired changes do not materialize, those involved will push to implement further changes in a few years.
    Note – I am not a lawyer so I do not profess to understand all of the fine details either. But I do know that nothing is written in stone, So amendments can, and will, be made in the future to ALL laws.

    Change is constant. That is why you currently have a job – to make and change laws as the country/world/situations evolve. Otherwise why would we need MLA’s?




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    • Anonymous says:

      Harden being used? You don’t know the man. Now, it’s more believable to say Minister Panton is delivering for his boys finally, but don’t worry, you can have him after the next election just to yourself.




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      • Anonymous says:

        Minister Panton is RETIRED. He has no boys to deliver for. Maybe that is why you fret. Maybe YOU want him to deliver for YOU but instead he is looking to move our country forward.




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  22. Anonymous says:

    If Cayman wants to go back to being a totally local market (conveyancing, wills and executries, divorces etc.) then it is going about things completely the right way. However that type of business would keep around half a dozen lawyers busy at most.

    Is it any wonder that Cayman is on the way down? If something is not done about things – and soon – then there won’t be much of an industry left in Cayman to argue about. Meanwhile most of the other offshore jurisdictions seem to be striding way ahead (and may soon be out of sight).

    Very worrying times for Cayman.




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    • Anonymous says:

      Yes lets get back to that, see where you guys go next. Try Jamaica or America




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    • Anonymous says:

      Right, because investors aren’t going to ask any questions if they stop seeing “A Cayman Islands Exempted Company” on the front page of every offer document…




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    • Anonymous says:

      Well said 12:55 but people like Arden and Ezzard (plus that lazy boy Winston who had it made in a big law firm if he would have done his work) are only interested in tearing down anything with furriners running it. Just out of jealousy and spite and little village ignorance.




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      • Anonymous says:

        I thought he was told he could never succeed because he was Caymanian. Lazy is not a description I would ascribe. Nor is, “boy”, which seems to have rolled off your keyboard with uncanny ease. See the problem?




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      • Anonymous says:

        This attempt at badmouthing Caymanians is a common theme amongst your kind,and so according to you, anyone except you expats are lazy here. But the realities are different for us, we are after all in our home country and have families and relatives to attend to, houses and property to maintain, and we come from a community that requires involvement. Whereas you expats come here and live in Apartments and come from a culture that puts their old people in homes for the elderly, forget them and see them once a year if they are lucky. We want a more balanced life plain and simple, and we care for our relatives. Money is not everything to us so we come from two completely different perspectives. Let us remind you however, that it is us that built this country plain and simple – and you have the good fortune to come and enjoy this paradise, where we made it so good that no one who comes here wants to ever leave.

        Its time to make the Work Permits 5 years and no more.




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        • Jotnar says:

          Yes, all those Caymanian lawyers and fund managers that built the financial services industry that pays for 2/3rds of the economy. And the overseas clients in that industry who completely understand if you want to have a balanced lifestyle rather than service their requests irrespective of time difference or deadlines. Yep, no problem with that business model or losing those workaholic expats that make it work.




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        • Anonymous says:

          “We care for our relatives”. Really? Have you been to the Pines recently and have you asked the people in government responsible for social services about the hundreds of native Caymanians who have grabbed their elderly relatives’ land and houses and expect government to look after them for free while they the young ones spend out the money? Give us a break!




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        • Anonymous says:

          9:45 Your comments are true and simply direct. I admit, I’m embarrassed and often offended when I see arrogance or ignorance portrayed by my fellow American visitors on your Island. I don’t work there, I just like to visit often, but I’m wise enough to know there’s traits embedded in certain tourists and expat workers that are quite “annoying” to local expectations. I too wish they’d stay home since it’s bad enough traveling with them! I do apologize for them though and truly respect your patience.
          Please know- There are those of us who come in peace and bring happiness to share in your islands beauty…without burden. You’ll know us, we’re the ones not demanding in a restaurants, we say thank you to anyone helping us from arrival to departure, and we’re definitely the ones with enough integrity to discipline our children during misbehavior. We know enough about your island history and the community bonds that were true for elder Caymanians, and it’s with immense appreciation to know of friends and families there who stay rich in those practices.
          With that being said, I would like to ensure you and your true Caymanian kind that there’s always going to be bad apples amongst the bunch, but please don’t let that leave a distaste for the rest. We’re not all the same.
          With love from the cold North,
          (see you soon)




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      • Anonymous says:

        That’s idiotic. Don’t bash those men actually trying to improve this country




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    • Anonymous says:

      Do you ever consider the fact that there may have been a conscious effort to keep Caymanians out of fair participation has caused some to reach the conclusion that they do not give a damn?




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    • Anonymous says:

      There is another avenue the high street firms can excel at when everything else is driven to jurisdictions outside Cayman ; Criminal defence is a burgeoning area here. The big South Church St and Elgin Ave outfits amongst others can send all the top brass O.S. and demote a skeleton crew for local work. The Porsche 911’s and Range Rovers can all get flogged on local classified ad’s and the staff left can go get a Toyota Tercel in place of , to get about in. That will go over great . If CIG works hard enough at it , the legal industry can go back to what it was in the 60’s & 70’s except no offshore finance work . To make everyone feel at home , a company can import some Mini Mokes from Africa , lawyers used to love driving those here. Get some pink and candy apple ones for the yummy mummies . 2016 Range Rover for sale , owner left island / Forced sale CI 3,000.00 obo.




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    • Anonymous says:

      Striding ahead with laws that actually benefit their jurisdiction- Thad the opposite of the what this bill proposes to do




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  23. Anonymous says:

    This is so very unfortunate! These guys have found themselves irrelevant and are acting like sore losers. Mr. Panton has been open and transparent in this process and to attack the mans character at this point is not politics but down right nasty!




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  24. Anonymous says:

    I strongly believe that this law needs to be reviewed properly before it is passed. Get our brightest, conflict-free people together and rip this bill apart. I was told that the people who drafted this law did it in such a way that it is full of loop holes. Come on. An Analyst can easily pick this apart. Get it done Cayman before we are left licking our bruises.




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    • Anonymous says:

      Why would you lick your bruises?




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    • Jotnar says:

      Have you actually read the bill?




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      • Anonymous says:

        I think that writer has made it quite clear that they haven’t read the Bill. I bet 95% of those commenting against it haven’t read it either! The just have a level of prejudice which allows them to rely on what one or two people say to justify their unsound positions.




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  25. Anonymous says:

    This is absolutely ridiculous and, amongst other things represents a complete misunderstanding of how this industry works. At some point I hope somebody points out to the LA that excessive government interference in private businesses has predictable results, and financial services is a highly mobile industry. The industry is under significant threat from external forces – regulators, Governments, media – and instead of trying to work cooperatively to ensure its future health when it is needed more than ever, local politicians choose now to try to throw their weight around and create animosity, largely over conjecture and speculation about how much money there is to be made and the fact that Caymanian lawyers might not be getting rich enough. And now we also want to punish the firms for working outside of Cayman to get the business in (despite what politicians seem to think, the work does not originate on island) – this is what creates the local jobs. Brilliant, carry on.

    PS – “Immense improvement”? Seriously? Laws attempting to regulate private business rarely bring “immense improvement” to anything except CIG coffers.




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  26. Anonymous says:

    This from the man who, when a Minister in 2007, declared that diesel was the only viable way of generating electricity? Old saying – You can’t fix stupid!




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  27. Sharkey says:

    Mr McLean , the Attorneys are not to be blamed , it’s yours and everyone in the LA incompetence to be blamed and should be sued.




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  28. Anonymous says:

    We are all so lucky to have Arden as an MLA. Other countries must envy us. If he were not so ethical and public-spirited I am sure he would be a partner in a major, international law firm.




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  29. Don't bite the hand that feeds you says:

    Careful Arden.




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    • Diogenes says:

      Unfortunately Arden thinks it is the voting public that feeds him, rather than the people who actually pay for 2 thirds of the economy.




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  30. Anonymous says:

    While I understand their viewpoint, can they affirm the validity of the survey respondents? These findings are great and all, but it seeming lacks substance and legitimacy.

    Conducting an online survey means practically any individual could’ve participated, lawyer or not. Or am I wrong?




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  31. Anonymous says:

    Nobody should be above the law! If it is t I forced against these firms this is just one bug corrupt banana republic!




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  32. Anonymous says:

    Too funny, would love to see the DPP go up against the big firms.




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  33. Anonymous says:

    Assuming unqualified people are practicing Cayman law in other countries (is there any actual evidence of this) it is hard to see what Cayman can do about it. Can it really be shown that the local firms “control” the foreign offices?




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    • Anonymous says:

      they publically admit it. Such arrogance




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      • Anonymous says:

        So you’re taking Arden’s claims as gospel without any investigation of your own. Interesting.




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        • Anonymous says:

          Type in “Cayman Law” on the websites of law firms with familiar names in Hong Kong. Look at the names of the lawyers doing that work. Then look at the names on the court roll in Cayman confirming who is authorized to practice Cayman Law. Arden is right. There is a problem.




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    • JTB says:

      For ‘unqualified’ read ‘highly qualified but not paying an extortionate work permit or practising certificate fee to CIG’




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      • Anonymous says:

        Exactly.




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      • Anonymous says:

        Yes, and they do not pay practicing certificate fees either. See the problem?




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      • Anonymous says:

        Every country in the world requires their lawyers to be qualified. If you move to the U.S. To practice you must be qualified there. Now move across the border and yet again you have to qualify again.

        Once you qualify as an attorney in one jurisdiction and wish to move to another, you have to abide by the laws of that new jurisdiction to practice. Cayman is the only place in the world that has these relaxed unenforceable laws that are so wishy washy with so many loopholes that you do not seem to have to qualify.




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      • Anonymous says:

        “Extortionate?” Now that’s rich.

        Compare the tax free income you make, the tax free bonuses, the virtually golden gateway to partnership and PR/ citizenship to the measly work permit fee for a financial services legal practitioner.

        You are more entitled than an unemplohyed crack head lined up at the NAU.

        The nerve playing the victim card. If you weren’t so godless you would be on your knees thanking God everyday for the opportunity to be here.




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    • Caymanian says:

      Actually I think that was already proven. If I recall this is what spawned the whole topic the first go around.




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  34. Jotnar says:

    Oh dear. It would be helpful if the opposition MLAs confined themselves to issues they actually understood. Section 10 only deals with the preparation of instruments – not the provision of advice, which is the bigger issue. You can bet your boots that the drafting of instruments work is done locally and within section 10 since its minimal in relation to the costs of the advice that preceded it, and is probably largely done by clerks. In any event, the fine for breach is a measly $200 per instance, not even per hour – the average law firm on this island is going to charge way more than that even just for the drafting process.

    On the other hand, the current law restricts the provision of advice “in the Islands” – but is entirely silent on the provision of advice outside of the Islands. So what are we going to prosecute the law firms for – for breaching a provision of the law that doesn’t actually exist but which the MLAs wish did! As opposed to supporting or asking for changes to the draft law which will regulate the provision of overseas advice. Of course, actually doing something constructive is not as attention grabbing as saying law firms should be prosecuted, not matter how baseless such a claim is.

    I think MLAs who spend 90% of their time grandstanding on public radio and the media, or dealing with their private business, rather than in the LA representing their constituents and, passing laws to assist the local economy and ensuring those laws are actually enforced should be prosecuted for wasting the massive salaries they are provided with at the publics expense, but unfortunately that’s not in the law either.




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    • Anonymous says:

      You couldn’t be more incorrect




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    • Anonymous says:

      Now that you have established the conduct the MLA’s are complaining of is only “a little illegal” can you now please describe whether such conduct is acceptable for officers of the court and where exactly you draw the line?




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      • Diogenes says:

        I think what he actually said was that they were not breaking the law at all, but even if they were, the penalty under the existing law is so paltry as to make a prosecution completely pointless.




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        • Anonymous says:

          So, if they are breaking the law, it would be acceptable because prosecution would be pointless?




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    • Anonymous says:

      …”issues they actually understood”…….Such as what, Jotnar? I’m having trouble thinking of any.




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    • Anonymous says:

      Well said!!!




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  35. Anonymous says:

    What part of “Not everyone in Cayman is bound by Cayman Islands Laws” do these guys not understand?




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  36. Anonymous says:

    So the MLA’s did nothing for how many years? And now they wish to prosecute on the basis that they failed to rectify anything. Only in Cayman.




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