Swiss grant request for Takkas’ extradition

| 09/10/2015 | 12 Comments
Cayman News Service

Cayman Islands Football Association HQ, Grand Cayman

(CNS): Swiss authorities have approved the US extradition request for Costas Takkas, who was Jeffrey Webb’s assistant when he was CONCACAF president. Takkas, who was once a resident of the Cayman Islands and a general secretary with the Cayman Islands Football Association, was working for Webb as an attache in Miami after the local football boss became the regional president. They were both in Zürich in May when they were caught up in the dawn raid that lifted the lid on the massive corruption investigation being carried out by the US law enforcement authorities into FIFA.

Cayman News Service

Costas Takkas

Takkas, a British national, has been on remand in Switzerland since his arrest as part of the probe two days before the FIFA presidential election. He is accused of accepting millions of dollars of bribes in exchange for awarding marketing contracts, which the Swiss justice office said “massively influenced the competitive situation and distorted the market for media rights in connection with the World Cup qualifying matches”, as they confirmed his extradition.

“Other sports marketing companies were placed at a disadvantage, and the affected football federations were prevented from negotiating more favourable marketing agreements. In Switzerland, such conduct would be deemed unfair practices under the Federal Act on Unfair Competition,” the authorities said, as they justified allowing the request by the US authorities for Takkas.

According to a release from the federal office, Takkas can appeal the extradition order within the next 30 days but in its ruling the FOJ concluded that all of the conditions for extradition were fulfilled.

So far Webb is the only one of the seven football officials arrested in Zürich over four months ago who has already gone to the United States. While extradition has been approved for two others, they are all contesting the orders and remain in Switzerland.

Webb is due to appear in court in New York later this month for another appearance but he has already pleaded not guilty to the charges laid against him in the massive $150 million FIFA racketeering investigation. Webb is on bail after he was able to raise a $10 million bond by handing over a collection of luxury goods and properties, including a Ferrari, a Rolex and other designer watches, as well his wife’s diamonds.

Since the FIFA scandal rocked the football world in May, the administrative players have continued to make headlines at home and abroad. Sepp Blatter has now been suspended for 90 days by the association’s ethics committee and he is currently part of an investigation launched by the Swiss attorney general’s office into corruption surrounding the last two World Cup awards. The Swiss investigation is running parallel to the US investigation, which spans more than twenty years.

Meanwhile, here in Cayman, CIFA has begun a recruitment drive for a new general secretary after Paul Macey resign in the wake of the CIFA annual elections and the local controversies surrounding that and the prohibition on other nominations for the executive positions in CIFA

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Category: Crime, Europe, USA, World News

Comments (12)

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  1. Stove Pipe says:

    By Product mi @$$ simply put Mr Webb didn’t have the brains to put this together! The issue is not one of condoning this type of despicable corruption the issue on this island we have yet to see certain nationalities get arrested for the numerous international financial scandals that have plagued and damaged this little island reputation. Who are the real money launders in Cayman???




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    • Anonymous says:

      Oh you mean like AIG, Fannie and Freddie, Parmalat, Madof? WE don’t have major scandals here, we have moderate scandals here. Webb is the biggest one. Maybe a few more to fall from high positions if Mr. Johnson is correct. Frankly, it needs a good clean out currently, especially CIMA.




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    • Anonymous says:

      I would wait and see before running my mouth. Canover still to come. Webb still treading water and lots more in roads are being built that lead to Cayman. That may surprise you who is into money laundering, who is under international regulation and who thinks that the law does not apply to them. Sadly, the phrase “I am Caymanian” didn’t seem to have much effect on either the Swiss police or the FBI!




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  2. Anonymous says:

    I think you will find it is Greece. Regardless of where the offenders come from, it seems that many roads all lead back to Cayman.
    Within months, I think you will see a lot more too with genuine links to Caymanians being the key. I would save any attempt at deflection then, you will need it more!




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    • Chris Johnson says:

      I think you are quite correct. As long as Cayman is seen to be taking the correct action it not reflect to badly on the country. The problems lies with the football teams themselves who still condone the actions of Webb, Watson and Blake. Until the presidents of Cayman Football clubs change, nothing can take place at the CIMA level where very clearly there has been huge corruption.
      Please read my article on viewpoint which illustrates the fraud that has taken place at the new field of broken dreams. Hopefully the anti corruption investigation will result in some form of prosecution.
      Unfortunately I think there is a much bigger picture involving Warner , Webb and other prominent citizens. Takas is just a by product in the overall fraud.




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      • Anonymous says:

        “Hopefully the anti corruption investigation will result in some form of prosecution.” Chris, you should do stand up with material like that. If only that would happen. Still, I reckon CIFA voted for Blatter and XXXXX to set up a defence of insanity in case things ever got sticky for them.




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        • Chris Johnson says:

          Rest assured that I have met my obligations as a chartered accountant but remember much of the documentation I have is a matter of public record. You could have done much of the investigation work yourself.




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      • Anonymous says:

        Chris, why is it that the clubs/teams can not see the bigger picture and have the courage to change this crop of allegedly corrupted officials? Are the clubs corrupted themselves and if so, how? All it would take is a few free tickets to watch Brazil in Miami or a coupe of expensive meals?




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        • Chris Johnson says:

          I believe that the task is too great for most clubs to contemplate. It takes individuals with strength to challenge the status quo and most people do not have the time or inclination to stand. When footballers like Renard come along they are rejected. Why I ask? CIFA needs some serious new blood to turn it around.




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          • Anonymous says:

            Well them, why if they do not have the inclination and time to make a challenge themselves they do not support those are willing to do so? Petty jealousy? Renard is willing and I am sure he will be able to assemble a team of people to turn things around. Over the last year Cayman have been very active in the international scene under Renard’s office. The U20 competed in Curacao, the U17 in Jamaica, the U23 in Haiti and the Senior Team competed in Belize, Jamaica, Dominican Republic, CIFA has employed very capable coaching staff, so we know that Renard understand that in order to improve we have to compete at every level and on a regular basis. Not every four years as it is the case know. Come on clubs have some courage and take responsibility. It is your duty.




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            • Chris Johnson says:

              May I suggest a meeting of the teams without intervention from Blake etc. A leader will surely emerge. Just a thought.




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  3. Anonymous says:

    I thought Takos came from Mexico?




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