Hit and run driver bailed despite previous charges

| 11/05/2015 | 1 Comment

(CNS): Simon Courtney, a Cayman-based lawyer who is accused of mowing down two tourists in a hit and run on West Bay Road earlier this year was on bail at the time in connection with existing charges relating to other serious traffic offences, according to the police, but he has not been remanded in custody.

Cayman News Service

Ford Shelby involved in the crash that injured two tourists, shown here in local car show

Courtney (49), an offshore attorney listed as working as an associate at Forbes Hare on the firm’s website, was charged with dangerous driving, leaving the scene of an accident and inflicting grievous bodily harm after his award-winning red Shelby Mustang mounted the pavement in front of Villas of the Galleon.

The car hit the two visitors, who were walking in the area, before it crashed into a wall on the evening of Sunday 25 January. The couple were both injured and the man was airlifted to the United States, where he underwent facial reconstruction surgery while his wife was treated at the George Town hospital and has since recovered.

After the crash and an alleged brief exchange at the scene, Courtney left but was arrested shortly afterwards. However, charges were not filed until last week, more than three months after the smash. When Courtney appeared in court, he was bailed to reappear on 25 May, despite having existing and as yet unresolved charges, including driving under the influence of alcohol, which date back to 2011.

Police confirmed the policy regarding bail, which is generally not given to an accused person who who fails to surrender to custody, interferes with witnesses or commits an offence while on bail. In such cases, according to the RCIPS, an application would generally be made to the court to remand the accused in custody.

Tags:

Category: Courts, Crime

Comments (1)

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  1. Anonymous says:

    So how was he allowed bail then?

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